Rising suicide rates among veterinarians

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() Veterinarians are more than TWICE as likely to die by suicide as job leaves them in emotional turmoil, support group warns Soaring suicide rates among veterinarians has prompted the formation of an online mental health group called Not One More Vet to tackle the growing crisis Male vets are 2.1 times as likely and female vets 3.5 times as likely to die by suicide compared with the general population - a damning report found Dr. Carrie Jurney who is on the board of Not One More Vet said the stats were especially alarming because 60 percent of vets are women The access to lethal medicines is also an issue for those under intense pressure 

By Dailymail.com Reporter

Published: 21:42 BST, 7 September 2019 | Updated: 21:48 BST, 7 September 2019

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Overworked veterinarians are more than twice as likely to die by suicide because of their isolated working conditions and the emotional turmoil of trying to save people's beloved pets, a support group has warned. 

The soaring suicide rates has even prompted the formation of an online mental health group called Not One More Vet.

Veterinarians are killing themselves in such alarming numbers that the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention found male vets are 2.1 times as likely and female vets 3.5 times as likely to die by suicide compared with the general population. 

Veterinarians are killing themselves in such alarming numbers that the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention found male vets are 2.1 times as likely and female vets 3.5 times as likely to die by suicide compared with the general population

Veterinarians are killing themselves in such alarming numbers that the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention found male vets are 2.1 times as likely and female vets 3.5 times as likely to die by suicide compared with the general population

Dr. Carrie Jurney who is on the board of Not One More Vet said the stats were especially alarming because 60 percent of vets are women

Dr. Carrie Jurney who is on the board of Not One More Vet said the stats were especially alarming because 60 percent of vets are women

'I had 86 people in my vet school class,' Jurney says. 'Graduating class of 2005. Three of them are gone. Died by their own hand.' Dr Jurney cites a number of reasons that to contribute to the high stress work life including large student debts, emotional strain and long hours

Dr. Carrie Jurney who is on the board of Not One More Vet said the stats were especially

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