SIX named storms including two hurricanes are swirling around the US waiting to ...

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Six named storms including hurricanes Lorena and Jerry are swirling around the US after two were left dead and 1,700 more people needed to be rescued in the wake of Imelda.

The combined activity of Humberto, Jerry, Kiko, Loreno and Mario in both the Atlantic and Eastern Pacific basins are believed to tie the modern day record for storms that was set in 1992, according to the National Hurricane Center (NHC). 

'Anyone want a tropical storm? They are forming like roaches out there,' tweeted Eric Blake, one of the NHC forecasters. 'It's not something that you see all the time, but not unheard of, either,' added Weather Channel meteorologist Danielle Banks.

They follow slow-churning storm Imelda that has dumped more than 40 inches of rain in some parts of Texas since Monday and the downpour may continue through Friday in parts of eastern Texas and western Louisiana.

The six storms due to descend on the US, including hurricanes Jerry and Lorena. They are waiting to strike after Imelda devastated Houston and other areas

The six storms due to descend on the US, including hurricanes Jerry and Lorena. They are waiting to strike after Imelda devastated Houston and other areas 

Dwain Kaufman (right) waits for his wife as she is helped into the back of a family member's truck by Beaumont firefighters and members of the Texas National Guard on Thursday. The remnants of Tropical Storm Imelda unleashed torrential rains in parts of Texas, prompting hundreds of water rescues, a hospital evacuation and road closures as the powerful storm system quickly drew comparisons to 2017's Hurricane Harvey

Dwain Kaufman (right) waits for his wife as she is helped into the back of a family member's truck by Beaumont firefighters and members of the Texas National Guard on Thursday. The remnants of Tropical Storm Imelda unleashed torrential rains in parts of Texas, prompting hundreds of water rescues, a hospital evacuation and road closures as the powerful storm system quickly drew comparisons to 2017's Hurricane Harvey

A driver takes a cellphone photo of a flooded car on the Interstate 10 feeder road in Beaumonth, Southeast Texas, in Southeast Texas. The National Weather Service says most of Southeast Texas was under a flash flood watch through Friday morning. (Guiseppe Barranco/The Beaumont Enterprise via AP)

A driver takes a cellphone photo of a flooded car on the Interstate 10 feeder road in in Southeast Texas. The National Weather Service says most of Southeast Texas was under a flash flood watch through Friday morning

Jerran Pearson (left) and Ryan Bettencourt and his dog, Chief, are rescued by boat from their neighborhood flooded due to heavy rain spawned by Tropical Depression Imelda on Thursday, in Patton Village, Texas

Jerran Pearson (left) and Ryan Bettencourt and his dog, Chief, are rescued by boat from their neighborhood flooded due to heavy rain spawned by Tropical Depression Imelda on Thursday, in Patton Village, Texas

In the aftermath rescue crews with boats were scrambling to reach stranded drivers and families trapped in their homes as the deluge inundates the state.

Imelda's path of destruction led to the deaths of two men on Thursday.

Nineteen-year-old Hunter Morrison was electrocuted and drowned while trying to move his horse to safety during a lightning storm, according to a message from his family shared by the Jefferson County Sheriff's Office.

A man in his 40s or 50s, who is yet to be named, drowned when he tried to drive a van through eight-foot-deep floodwaters near Bush Intercontinental Airport in Houston during the Thursday afternoon rush hour, Harris County Sheriff Ed Gonzalez said.

Police were working well into the night to clear roads of vehicles stalled and abandoned because of flooding, Houston Police Chief Art Acevedo said. 

Officials in Harris County, which includes Houston, said there had been a combination of around 2,000 high-water rescues and evacuations to get people to shelter as the longevity and intensity of the rain surprised even those who had been bracing for floods. The storm also flooded parts of south-western Louisiana.

A man wades through the floodwaters in Texas, where more than four inches has been dumped on the region

A man wades through the floodwaters in Texas, where more than four inches has been dumped on the region

Hunter Morrison was killed earlier on Thursday after being electrocuted while trying to rescue his horse from the rising floodwaters in Texas, where a state of disaster has been declared

Hunter Morrison was killed earlier on Thursday after being electrocuted while trying to rescue his horse from the rising floodwaters in Texas, where a state of disaster has been declared

A pair of men get into a boat to float in while they try to rescue a family trapped by floodwaters. At least 1000 people have been rescued, and some are climbing to the roof of their homes to escape the flooding

A pair of men get into a boat to float in while they try to rescue a family trapped by floodwaters. At least 1000 people have been rescued, and some are climbing to the roof of their homes to escape the flooding

Homes and buildings were flooded by the horrific rainfall. These included Durham Elementary School in Houston, where teachers were forced to make a bridge out of benches to safety escort young students o the cafeteria for lunch. 

The footage was taken by a teacher who wished to remain anonymous and could be heard saying, 'Who's gonna believe me? Nobody's gonna believe this. We are flooding!'

She explained that the rain started pouring down at around 11am local time and soon after walkways were flooded with several inches of water. The teachers, who feared children getting cold and wet clothes especially while entering air conditioned buildings, constructed a walkway. 

'He started grabbing the benches and he made a long bridge for the kids,' she said. 

One of many acts of heroism in the state, as neighbors, strangers and emergency services battled to rescue their fellow Texans, was the story of one high school football player who saved a woman and her toddler after she drove her SUV into a ditch filled with around 15 foot of water.

Jayden Payne jumped into the car to help save the woman and her child in Aldine, north of Houston. 'I put her on the side of the grass and she put her baby on the grass,' Payne told CBS News. 'She just told me, she was like, 'You're my guardian angel.''

Another emerged of a tractor trailer driver being saved by onlookers when he drove into a flooded street. Water had flooded up to the windshield of his vehicle, when passersby on a bridge jumped onto the vehicle and used a rope and hammer to save the man's life. The unnamed man could be seen being pulled to safety by at least two or three other men.

'I think it was a lot worse than kinda the general public had anticipated,' one Houston Fire Department volunteer said.

Fred Stewart, left, is helped to high ground by Splendora Police officer Mike Jones after he was rescued from his flooded neighborhood as rains from Imelda inundated the area

Fred Stewart, left, is helped to high ground by Splendora Police officer Mike Jones after he was rescued from his flooded neighborhood as rains from Imelda inundated the area

A man sits on top of a truck on a flooded road on Thursday in Houston. Members of the Houston Fire Dept. brought him a life jacket and walked him to dry land

A man sits on top of a truck on a flooded road on Thursday in Houston. Members of the Houston Fire Dept. brought him a life jacket and walked him to dry land

Jade McLain (left) carries Thor out of a boat as she and Fred Stewart were rescued from their flooded neighborhood inundated by rains on Thursday

Jade McLain (left) carries Thor out of a boat as she and Fred Stewart were rescued from their flooded neighborhood inundated by rains on Thursday

Terry Spencer (above) carries his daughter, Trinity, through high water on 59th Street near Stewart Road in Galveston, Texas, on Wednesday

Terry Spencer (above) carries his daughter, Trinity, through high water on 59th Street near Stewart Road in Galveston, Texas, on Wednesday 

In Houston stranded drivers could be seen holding their children above the waters and putting life jackets on them before they were taken to higher ground. In nearby Beaumont, helicopters operated by the Coast Guard carried patients out one by one to safety from the rising floodwaters.

One resident said: 'The fact that there are cars stranded and people are getting high-water rescued, that's never happened in our time we've lived here... Even after Harvey.'

It's estimated that around 37,000 people have lost power so far.  

Another clip showed a man who was forced to abandon his car after floodwaters accompanying the storm flooded above the bonnet of his vehicle. The man could be seen climbing out a window with his lights on and the car pointing downwards as if the vehicle had just became stuck in an underwater ditch.

The National Weather Service said preliminary estimates suggested Jefferson County was deluged with more than 43.15 inches of rain in 72 hours, which would make it the seventh wettest tropical cyclone in US history and the fourth wettest tropical cyclone ever to impact the state of Texas, according to National Weather Service Houston.

Even when Houston was finally rid of the worst, central roads remained littered with abandoned cars submerged in water.

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