Meghan Markle and Prince Harry visit Cape Town's poignant District 6 Museum

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Harry and Meghan have arrived at the District 6 museum in Cape Town - which honours thousands of families forcibly removed from the area during the apartheid.  

The families were removed after the area, adjacent to the Cape Town business district, was declared whites-only and bulldozers moved in to demolish homes.

It comes after The Duchess of Sussex earlier told teenage girls in a township known as 'South Africa's murder capital' that she is visiting them as a 'woman of colour and their sister' in a rousing speech on the first day of her and her husband's latest royal tour.

Meghan and Harry are visiting Nyanga, where one in 206 people are killed each year, just outside of Cape Town, today after touching down at the airport this morning. 

The couple's visit to the troubled township has been arranged amid a major security presence, with details kept secret until the last minute to prevent any unrest and four-month-old Archie left behind at their residence with his nanny. 

Meghan, 38, stood on a tree stump to address crowds of local women and girls supported by community charity Justice Desk. 

She said: 'May I just say that while I am here with my husband as a member of The Royal Family, I want you to know that for me I am here with you as a mother, as a wife, as a woman, as a woman of colour and as your sister.'  

Meghan and her husband, 35, were seen dancing and laughing with locals on the first stop of their 10-day tour of Africa.  

She has written about her racial heritage before, but this is thought to be the first time she has spoken about it publicly since becoming a royal. 

The Duke and Duchess of Sussex, Prince Harry and his wife Meghan, arrive at the District Six, on the first day of their African tour in Cape Town

The Duke and Duchess of Sussex, Prince Harry and his wife Meghan, arrive at the District Six, on the first day of their African tour in Cape Town

Harry and Meghan are visiting the District 6 museum that honours thousands of families forcibly removed during the apartheid era after the area, adjacent to the Cape Town business district, was declared whites-only and bulldozers moved in to demolish homes

Harry and Meghan are visiting the District 6 museum that honours thousands of families forcibly removed during the apartheid era after the area, adjacent to the Cape Town business district, was declared whites-only and bulldozers moved in to demolish homes

Duke of Sussex and wife Meghan Markle, Duchess of Sussex pictured Visiting the District Six Museum. The District Six Museum is located in the inner-city residential area in Cape Town which was subject to the forced relocation of 60,000 inhabitants of various races during Apartheid in the 1970s

Duke of Sussex and wife Meghan Markle, Duchess of Sussex pictured Visiting the District Six Museum. The District Six Museum is located in the inner-city residential area in Cape Town which was subject to the forced relocation of 60,000 inhabitants of various races during Apartheid in the 1970s

Harry and Meghan have arrived at the District 6 museum in Cape Town - which honours thousands of families forcibly removed from the area during the apartheid

Prince Harry and Meghan arrive at the District 6 museum in Cape Town

Harry and Meghan (left and right) have arrived at the District 6 museum in Cape Town - which honours thousands of families forcibly removed from the area during the apartheid

Their Royal Highnesses (pictured arriving at District Six Museum) will tour the District Six Museum to learn about their work to reunite members of the community forcibly relocated during the apartheid era

Their Royal Highnesses (pictured arriving at District Six Museum) will tour the District Six Museum to learn about their work to reunite members of the community forcibly relocated during the apartheid era

Meghan is pictured giving a speech to crowds in Nyanga, often described as South Africa's 'murder capital' this afternoon

Meghan is pictured giving a speech to crowds in Nyanga, often described as South Africa's 'murder capital' this afternoon

Meghan and her husband, 35, were seen dancing and laughing with locals on the first stop of their 10-day tour of Africa

Meghan and her husband, 35, were seen dancing and laughing with locals on the first stop of their 10-day tour of Africa

Harry and Meghan are visiting Nyanga in the Cape Flats just outside of Cape Town today on the first stop of their 10-day tour of Africa, where one in 206 people are killed each year, according to recent statistics

Meghan spoke to children at at the Nyanga Township in Cape Town today (left and right, speaking)

Harry and Meghan are visiting Nyanga in the Cape Flats just outside of Cape Town today on the first stop of their 10-day tour of Africa, where one in 206 people are killed each year, according to recent statistics. Meghan spoke to children at at the Nyanga Township in Cape Town today (left and right, speaking) 

The Duchess addressed crowds of women and girls stood on a tree stump as she wore a Justice Desk charity bracelet

The Duchess addressed crowds of women and girls stood on a tree stump as she wore a Justice Desk charity bracelet 

Meghan said to the crowd in Cape Town: 'And just on one personal note may I just say that while I'm here with my husband as a member of the royal family, I want you to know from me I am here with you as a mother, as a wife, as a woman, as a woman of colour and as your sister'

Meghan said to the crowd in Cape Town: 'And just on one personal note may I just say that while I'm here with my husband as a member of the royal family, I want you to know from me I am here with you as a mother, as a wife, as a woman, as a woman of colour and as your sister'

Meghan was wearing a dress by the label Mayamiko, an ethical and sustainable womenswear and lifestyle brand, producing clothes made in Malawi. She spoke to children at Nyanga Township in Cape Town, South Africa

Meghan was wearing a dress by the label Mayamiko, an ethical and sustainable womenswear and lifestyle brand, producing clothes made in Malawi. She spoke to children at Nyanga Township in Cape Town, South Africa 

The Duchess, 38, stood on a tree stump as she made a speech surrounded by Justice Desk female boxers

Pictured: Meghan makes a speech to crowds in Nyanga

The Duchess, 38, stood on a tree stump as she made a speech surrounded by Justice Desk female boxers, which saw her refer to her own racial heritage for the first time as a British royal 

Meghan made the point of telling the young women and others from the community it was her 'first time' in South Africa adding 'you're incredible and so powerful, because you're all powerful'

Meghan made the point of telling the young women and others from the community it was her 'first time' in South Africa adding 'you're incredible and so powerful, because you're all powerful' 

Britain's royal couple Prince Harry and Meghan Duchess of Sussex, greet youths on a visit to the Nyanga Methodist Church in Cape Town, South Africa

Britain's royal couple Prince Harry and Meghan Duchess of Sussex, greet youths on a visit to the Nyanga Methodist Church in Cape Town, South Africa

Harry and Meghan appeared close as they visited a Justice Desk initiative in Nyanga township. While there Meghan spoke publicly about her position in the world as a 'woman of colour' for the first time, as she gave a rousing speech to township teenage girls

Harry and Meghan appeared close as they visited a Justice Desk initiative in Nyanga township. While there Meghan spoke publicly about her position in the world as a 'woman of colour' for the first time, as she gave a rousing speech to township teenage girls

Meghan wore her hair up in a sleek ponytail as she and Harry arrived at the Nyanga Township in Cape Town. Mayamiko produces clothes made in Malawi and inspired by African artisan traditions and prints

Meghan wore her hair up in a sleek ponytail as she and Harry arrived at the Nyanga Township in Cape Town. Mayamiko produces clothes made in Malawi and inspired by African artisan traditions and prints

Meghan has publicly spoken about her position in the world as a 'woman of colour' for the first time, as she gave a rousing speech to township teenage girls (pictured alongside Prince Harry)

Meghan has publicly spoken about her position in the world as a 'woman of colour' for the first time, as she gave a rousing speech to township teenage girls (pictured alongside Prince Harry)

The Duke and Duchess of Sussex are pictured beaming as they are surrounded by dancing girls from the Nyanga township near Cape Town this afternoon

The Duke and Duchess of Sussex are pictured beaming as they are surrounded by dancing girls from the Nyanga township near Cape Town this afternoon 

Having a whale of a time! Meghan beamed as she danced with local girls in Nyanga this afternoon

Meghan chuckles as she is made to dance with local entertainers

Having a whale of a time! Meghan beamed as she danced with local girls in Nyanga this afternoon

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The first day of their 10-day, multi-country tour started in Cape Town with visits to girls' empowerment projects that teach rights and self-defense. Harry and Meghan danced a bit as a musical welcome greeted them in the township of Nyanga

The first day of their 10-day, multi-country tour started in Cape Town with visits to girls' empowerment projects that teach rights and self-defense. Harry and Meghan danced a bit as a musical welcome greeted them in the township of Nyanga

The Duke and Duchess of Sussex are visiting Nyanga township, one of Cape Town's largest black settlements, to learn about life for thousands of South Africans (left and right together)

The Duke and Duchess of Sussex are visiting Nyanga township, one of Cape Town's largest black settlements, to learn about life for thousands of South Africans (left and right together)

The couple (pictured together) had travelled to the area, a few miles out of the city centre, to see first-hand the work of the Justice Desk, a human rights organisation, which is supporting the development of the settlement's children

The couple (pictured together) had travelled to the area, a few miles out of the city centre, to see first-hand the work of the Justice Desk, a human rights organisation, which is supporting the development of the settlement's children

There was a carnival atmosphere inside the compound when the Duke and Duchess of Sussex arrived with female dances in traditional costume, musicians playing and the ecstatic youngsters waving their national flag

Meghan danced along to the music as she visited the Nyanga Township during a royal tour of South Africa

There was a carnival atmosphere inside the compound when the Duke and Duchess of Sussex arrived with female dances in traditional costume, musicians playing and the ecstatic youngsters waving their national flag

Meghan wore her hair up in a sleek ponytail as she and Harry arrived at the Nyanga Township in Cape Town. She danced with children at the Justice Desk initiative during the afternoon

Meghan wore her hair up in a sleek ponytail as she and Harry arrived at the Nyanga Township in Cape Town. She danced with children at the Justice Desk initiative during the afternoon

The duchess's shoes were Castaner's Carina black wedge espadrilles, which tie at the ankle, which she also wore on her tour to Australia last year. The Duke of Sussex look relaxed in a light open-necked shirt, dark trousers and beige trainers (pictured, both dancing with children at the Nyanga Township in Cape Town)

The duchess's shoes were Castaner's Carina black wedge espadrilles, which tie at the ankle, which she also wore on her tour to Australia last year. The Duke of Sussex look relaxed in a light open-necked shirt, dark trousers and beige trainers (pictured, both dancing with children at the Nyanga Township in Cape Town)

Harry got into the swing of things, dancing away with members of the Justice Desk, a human rights organisation, which is supporting the development of the settlement's children

The Duchess of Sussex dances as she begins her visit to South Africa, with her husband the Duke of Sussex, in the Nyanga Township, Cape Town, visiting a workshop that teaches children about their rights, self-awareness and safety and which provides self-defence classes and female empowerment training to young girls in the community

Harry and Meghan (left and right) both go into the swing of things, dancing away with members of the Justice Desk, a human rights organisation, which is supporting the development of the settlement's children

The Duchess of Sussex kicked off her royal tour to South Africa with the Duke of Sussex in a patterned black and white wrap dress by ethical womenswear brand Mayamiko (Harry and Meghan are pictured together)

The Duchess of Sussex kicked off her royal tour to South Africa with the Duke of Sussex in a patterned black and white wrap dress by ethical womenswear brand Mayamiko (Harry and Meghan are pictured together) 

Prince Harry, the Duke of Sussex, also made a speech to children at a Justice Desk initiative in Nyanga township. He said: 'I wanted to ensure that our first visit [to Cape Town] as a family - with my wife by my side - focused on the significant challenges facing millions of South Africans, while acknowledging the hope that we feel so strongly here'

Prince Harry, the Duke of Sussex, also made a speech to children at a Justice Desk initiative in Nyanga township. He said: 'I wanted to ensure that our first visit [to Cape Town] as a family - with my wife by my side - focused on the significant challenges facing millions of South Africans, while acknowledging the hope that we feel so strongly here'

Barely a couple of hours after landing in Cape Town, the royal couple visited the Arts Centre in Nyanga - dubbed the “murder capital” of South Africa

Barely a couple of hours after landing in Cape Town, the royal couple visited the Arts Centre in Nyanga - dubbed the 'murder capital' of South Africa (Meghan dances with children at the Arts Centre)

On leaving the Nyanga arts centre, traditional African dancers lined the exit and entertained locals and their special guests

On leaving the Nyanga arts centre, traditional African dancers lined the exit and entertained locals and their special guests

Britain's Prince Harry and his wife Meghan Duchess of Sussex, pose for a photo with youths at the Nyanga Methodist Church in Cape Town, South Africa

Britain's Prince Harry and his wife Meghan Duchess of Sussex, pose for a photo with youths at the Nyanga Methodist Church in Cape Town, South Africa

Prince Harry (pictured with Meghan and members of the Mbokodo Club) also spoke to the male coaches at the Mbokodo Club - which translates to 'The Rock Club'. The mantra of the group is set upon making girls and young women strong so they stand up to gender violence to give them strength, their motto being 'If you strike a woman, you strike a rock'

Prince Harry (pictured with Meghan and members of the Mbokodo Club) also spoke to the male coaches at the Mbokodo Club - which translates to 'The Rock Club'. The mantra of the group is set upon making girls and young women strong so they stand up to gender violence to give them strength, their motto being 'If you strike a woman, you strike a rock'

Harry (left) and Megan (centre) are pictured arriving in Cape Town this morning with baby their son Archie

Harry (left) and Megan (centre) are pictured arriving in Cape Town this morning with baby their son Archie 

The Duke of Sussex is pictured beaming as a smiling Meghan follows behind with four-month-old Archie in her arms as they get off their British Airways flight in Cape Town this morning

Pictured today: Harry and Meghan get off the plane in Cape Town, South Africa

The Duke of Sussex is pictured beaming as a smiling Meghan follows behind with four-month-old Archie in her arms as they get off their British Airways flight in Cape Town this morning

The Duchess wore a dress designed by the sustainable Malawi-based brand Mayamiko and the couple sported matching 'Justice Desk' beaded bracelets as they shook hands with beaming locals.

Quoting poet and civil rights activist Maya Angelou, Meghan said in her speech: 'Each time a woman stands up for herself, without knowing it, possibly without claiming it, she stands up for all women.'

'Now I know it's not easy and I know it must feel insurmountable at times, but your commitment to what is right gives all of us hope, especially your brothers and sisters here in your community who need you to continue to shine your light brightly. 

'Your commitment is inspiring, it is energising and it is extraordinary. You must keep going, you must know that what you're doing not only matters, it is vital because YOU are vital.' 

She said she felt 'humbled' to be in the Nyanga community's presence, as they stood firm in their 'values of respect, dignity and equality'. 

The Duchess continued: 'The work that's being done here is to keep women and children safer, which is needed now more than ever. 

Meghan's speech in full 

Hello! It is such privilege to meet all of you today and to start our visit, my first time in South Africa, here in Nyanga.

We have just spent some time seeing all the incredible work that the Justice Desk does and of course all of you amazing women and the men who are here helping you, Mbokodo, you are incredible and what you're doing is so powerful, because you're all powerful.

The work that's being done here is to keep women and children safer, which is needed now more than ever. This is an issue that's been at the forefront of people's minds here in South Africa, and of course across the globe, particularly over this past month.

Please know that my husband and I have been closely following what you've been experiencing here – as best we can from afar. But now that we are with you, we are eager to learn and see first-hand the work that you're doing, the vital work that you're doing, and that everything that is being done on the ground is making the great change that you not only need but that you deserve.

You have welcomed us into this community, have been open and honest with us, both about the dangers women and children face, and about how you are addressing them. The rights of women and girls is something that is very close to my heart, and the cause I have spent the majority of my life advocating for because I know that when women are empowered, the entire community flourishes.

So to be able to meet all of you today who are standing up for what's right in the face of adversity, I applaud you. We are encouraged to hear your President take the next steps to work towards preventing gender-based violence through education and necessary changes to reinforce the values of modern South Africa.

I do have to say I feel incredibly humbled to be in the presence of all of you as you stand firm in your core values of respect, dignity and equality.

I read a quote a few weeks ago and it resonated with me as I've been watching what's been happening here and your active efforts. Maya Angelou, the legendary poet and civil rights activist, once said: 'Each time a woman stands up for herself, without knowing it, possibly without claiming it, she stands up for all women.'

Now I know it's not easy and I know it must feel insurmountable at times, but your commitment to what is right gives all of us hope, especially your brothers and sisters here in your community who need you to continue to shine your light brightly. Your commitment is inspiring, it is energising and it is extraordinary. You must keep going, you must know that what you're doing not only matters, it is vital because YOU are vital.

And just on one personal note, may I just say that while I am here with my husband as a member of The Royal Family, I want you to know that for me I am here with you as a mother, as a wife, as a woman, as a woman of colour and as your sister. I am here with you and I am here FOR you and I thank you so much for showing my husband and I the spirit of Ubuntu and I look forward to our time over the next few days together. Thank you so much for having us.' 

'This is an issue that's been at the forefront of people's minds here in South Africa, and of course across the globe, particularly over this past month.

'Please know that my husband and I have been closely following what you've been experiencing here – as best we can from afar. 

'But now that we are with you, we are eager to learn and see first-hand the work that you're doing, the vital work that you're doing, and that everything that is being done on the ground is making the great change that you not only need but that you deserve.

'You have welcomed us into this community, have been open and honest with us, both about the dangers women and children face, and about how you are addressing them. 

'The rights of women and girls is something that is very close to my heart, and the cause I have spent the majority of my life advocating for because I know that when women are empowered, the entire community flourishes.

'So to be able to meet all of you today who are standing up for what's right in the face of adversity, I applaud you. We are encouraged to hear your President take the next steps to work towards preventing gender-based violence through education and necessary changes to reinforce the values of modern South Africa.'

Jessica Dewhurst, who founded the Justice Desk, an award winning human rights organisation which is working in the district, said: ' We feed people but we never ask why they are hungry in the first place. We are trying to fix the problem, not just put a plaster on it. I think that really resonated with Prince Harry.

'Meghan is so nice. In the room she and Harry met a lot of victims of gender-based violence and they shared their stories with them. It was really wonderful to have that openness and that honesty. 

'I think she was really impressed with the spirit of the girls, the girls supporting other girls. She was encouraging them to mentor other girls in the community.

'To hear her say she was standing her as a woman of colour sent shivers down my spine. 

'To be totally honest with you, when I heard that they wanted to say something I just thought it would be a 'thank you for having us, goodbye'. 

'But they tackled some real issues there. They spoke about gender based violence and the issues our community is facing.

'What's also really exciting is that they are watching what is happening in our country and listening to what our president is saying. They are really encouraging us as South Africans to be accountable and to facilitate change.

'I think it's so fantastic. A lot of people think the Commonwealth is just the Commonwealth , but we have received real support from them for a number of years. This is the cherry on the cake.

'They are such a lovely couple. He was constantly making sure she was ok. When she was carrying something he offered to carry it for her, which I thought was so sweet, but she was just like 'no, I can carry it. It's fine! ' They were just bouncing off each other. 

'They are a really good unit, they believe in the same things and that's really powerful. I think They give each other energy to do what they do. They were supporting each other when they are hearing some harrowing stories. '

Speaking after Meghan's speech, Ms Dewhurst said: 'The Duchess said how proud she was of the girls and how amazing she though they all were. She held everyone's attention in that moment, the girls were just transfixed.

'After watching the boxing class which we hold as a means of teaching self defence and self worth to the young girls, we all sat in a circle and everyone can choose to share their stories, whatever is on their mind.

'Some of them spoke about how they used to fear growing up in Nyanga but now they have an outlet for their fears.

'We teach them to be strong and support each other, that they can educate themselves about their worth and in turn educate the men around them to be better individuals.

'When it came to her turn, the Duchess seemed very moved by what she has heard.

'She said 'I admire you all and your strength. If you stay strong and stay true to supporting each other as sisters, you can go and change the world'.

'It was incredible. The girls were inspired. She knew the important of being a mentor to the younger generation and was so in tune with what we are doing here.' 

Prince Harry also spoke to the male coaches at the Mbokodo Club - which translates to 'The Rock Club'. 

Joining in the fun! Harry also got a dance with a local woman as the couple made quite the impression on the Nyanga community

Joining in the fun! Harry also got a dance with a local woman as the couple made quite the impression on the Nyanga community

Meghan was taken by the hands by a local dancer who beamed as she boogied with the Duchess as husband Harry looked on

Meghan was taken by the hands by a local dancer who beamed as she boogied with the Duchess as husband Harry looked on 

Smiles all round: Meghan laughs and smiles as she dances hand-in-hand with a young woman from Nyanga

Smiles all round: Meghan laughs and smiles as she dances hand-in-hand with a young woman from Nyanga 

The Duchess of Sussex stoops down to hug a Nyanga schoolboy as the couple arrive in the troubled township for today's visit

Adorable moment Meghan hugs the shy young schoolboy

The Duchess of Sussex stoops down to hug a Nyanga schoolboy as the couple arrive in the troubled township for today's visit

Harry and Meghan (pictured greeting school children) are visiting Nyanga in the Cape Flats just outside of Cape Town today where one in 206 people are killed each year, as the first stop on their 10-day tour of Africa

Harry and Meghan (pictured greeting school children) are visiting Nyanga in the Cape Flats just outside of Cape Town today where one in 206 people are killed each year, as the first stop on their 10-day tour of Africa 

Harry beams as he kneels down to say hello to a schoolboy waiting to greet him in Nyanga, near Cape Town, South Africa

Harry beams as he kneels down to say hello to a schoolboy waiting to greet him in Nyanga, near Cape Town, South Africa

Prince Harry and his wife, Meghan, the Duchess of Sussex, began their first official tour as a family Monday with their infant son, Archie, in South Africa, with Meghan declaring to cheers that 'I am here with you as a mother, as a wife, as a woman, as a woman of color and as your sister'

The Duke and Duchess of Sussex visit the Nyanga Township during their royal tour of South Africa

Prince Harry and his wife, Meghan, the Duchess of Sussex, began their first official tour as a family Monday with their infant son, Archie, in South Africa, with Meghan declaring to cheers that I am here with you as a mother, as a wife, as a woman, as a woman of color and as your sister'

The mantra of the group is set upon making girls and young women strong so they stand up to gender violence to give

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