William and Kate visit north Pakistan Hindu Kush mountains where Diana went in ...

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The Duchess of Cambridge was the image of Princess Diana today when she and Prince William arrived in northern Pakistan to visit the Himalayan foothills on the second day of their tour.

William and Kate donned traditional Pakistani outfits as they stepped out among the Hindu Kush mountains in the Chitral district of Khyber Pakhtunkkhwa province. 

The couple are following in Diana's footsteps by visiting the same region she did on her 1991 trip. They were presented with a book commemorating her time in the region.  

The Cambridges hope to highlight the effects of climate change by witnessing one of the glaciers melting for themselves.   

Princess Diana is pictured visiting the Chitral Scouts in the Hindu Kush mountains, Pakistan in 1991

The Duchess of Cambridge was the image of Princess Diana today when she and Prince William arrived in northern Pakistan to visit the Himalayan foothills on the second day of their tour

The Duchess of Cambridge (far right) was the image of Princess Diana today (pictured in 1991 left) when she and Prince William arrived in northern Pakistan to visit the Himalayan foothills on the second day of their tour

The Duke used a speech at the historic Pakistan Monument on the second day of their five-day visit to draw attention to 'spectacular' glaciers melting in the area.

'Tomorrow we will be seeing some of these impacts first hand and meeting some of the communities adjusting to the new realities and new challenges that climate change has brought to their towns and villages,' William told a reception on Tuesday evening.

Princess Diana is pictured on a visit to the Chitral Scouts in Pakistan in 1991

Princess Diana is pictured on a visit to the Chitral Scouts in Pakistan in 1991 

'I hope to learn what more we all can do to help prevent and mitigate this impending global catastrophe.'

Anticipated to walk around the glacier's northern tip, the excursion will be the first time the royal couple have seen a melting glacier in person.

The couple hope to highlight the effect of global warming during the visit, which will also see them travel to a village in a valley of Chitral.

Isolated communities in the area have suffered from flash flooding in recent years as a result of the glaciers melting.

While in the Chitral valley, the couple are also due to explore a site damaged in severe floods in 2015, to meet the local community and hear how they are adapting their way of life in response to climate events.

William and Kate are expected to witness a drill conducted by volunteers from the local emergency response team - who are supported by UK aid - which was instrumental in preventing loss of life in 2015.

Before they depart the district, they will visit a settlement of the Kalash people to learn about their community, heritage and traditions.

The royal couple had a busy first day of engagements on Tuesday, which included visiting a government-run school in the capital Islamabad and meeting Prime Minister Imran Khan.

They ended the day at the reception, hosted by the British High Commissioner for Pakistan Thomas Drews, after arriving in an auto rickshaw.

Kate chuckles as she is greeted by officials in the Pakistani Himalayan foothills

The couple are following in Diana's footsteps by visiting the same region she did on her 1991 trip. They were presented with a book commemorating her time in the region

The couple are following in Diana's footsteps by visiting the same region she did on her 1991 trip. They were presented with a book commemorating her time in the region

The Duke and Duchess of Cambridge step out of a rickshaw in Islamabad, Pakistan, as they attend an evening reception yesterday

The Duke and Duchess of Cambridge step out of a rickshaw in Islamabad, Pakistan, as they attend an evening reception yesterday

William wore a sherwani by Karachi-based designer Naushemian

Kate is in a glittering emerald dress by Jenny Packham

William wore a sherwani by Karachi-based designer Naushemian, while Kate is in a glittering emerald dress by Jenny Packham

The reception in Islamabad last night is set to highlight the relationship between the UK and the Commonwealth country

The reception in Islamabad last night is set to highlight the relationship between the UK and the Commonwealth country

William speaks at the event - which showcased Pakistani music and culture. The couple met individuals from business, the creative arts, music and the film industry and members of government

William speaks at the event - which showcased Pakistani music and culture. The couple met individuals from business, the creative arts, music and the film industry and members of government

Kate watches on as William speaks to the gathered crowd at the Pakistan National Monument, during day two of their royal tour of the country

Kate watches on as William speaks to the gathered crowd at the Pakistan National Monument, during day two of their royal tour of the country

'We share unique bonds and so it will always be in our best interests for Pakistan to succeed,' the duke (pictured, with Kate in the background) said to the crowd. 'You can always rely on the UK to keep playing an important role as a key partner and friend'

'We share unique bonds and so it will always be in our best interests for Pakistan to succeed,' the duke (pictured, with Kate in the background) said to the crowd. 'You can always rely on the UK to keep playing an important role as a key partner and friend'

The Duke of Cambridge said to the crowd gathered at the Pakistan National Monument: 'The view from this hill would have been quite different when my grandmother, The Queen, first visited over half a century ago. Looking out, one would have seen the beginnings of a city under construction, yet to become the great capital that it is today'

The Duke of Cambridge said to the crowd gathered at the Pakistan National Monument: 'The view from this hill would have been quite different when my grandmother, The Queen, first visited over half a century ago. Looking out, one would have seen the beginnings of a city under construction, yet to become the great capital that it is today'

The Duke and Duchess of Cambridge smile for the camera as they attend a special reception hosted by the British High Commissioner Thomas Drew, at the Pakistan National Monument in Islamabad, Pakistan yesterday

The Duke and Duchess of Cambridge smile for the camera as they attend a special reception hosted by the British High Commissioner Thomas Drew, at the Pakistan National Monument in Islamabad, Pakistan yesterday

The Duchess of Cambridge speaks to a guest as she attends a special reception with Prince William in Pakistan yesterday. They opted for an auto rickshaw as they wrapped up their second day of the royal tour.

The Duchess of Cambridge speaks to a guest as she attends a special reception with Prince William in Pakistan yesterday. They opted for an auto rickshaw as they wrapped up their second day of the royal tour.

Kate (left speaking to a guest at the Pakistan National Monument) wore a glittering emerald dress by Jenny Packham, while William wore a similar-coloured traditional sherwani buttoned coat by Karachi-based designer Naushemian

The event is due to showcase Pakistani music and culture, and the couple (pictured together) will have the opportunity to meet individuals from business, the creative arts, music and the film industry and members of government

Kate (left speaking to a guest at the Pakistan National Monument) wore a glittering emerald dress by Jenny Packham, while William (right with Kate posing as they attend a special reception hosted by the British High Commissioner Thomas Drew) wore a similar-coloured traditional sherwani buttoned coat by Karachi-based designer Naushemian

The Duchess of Cambridge and Prince William, Duke of Cambridge, attend a special reception hosted by the British High Commissioner Thomas Drew (right) and his wife Joanna Drew, at the Pakistan National Monument during day two of their royal tour of Pakistan

The Duchess of Cambridge and Prince William, Duke of Cambridge, attend a special reception hosted by the British High Commissioner Thomas Drew (right) and his wife Joanna Drew, at the Pakistan National Monument during day two of their royal tour of Pakistan

The British High Commissioner Thomas Drew speaks to the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge on the second day of their royal tour of Pakistan. He hosted the couple alongside his wife Joanna Drew (left)

The British High Commissioner Thomas Drew speaks to the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge on the second day of their royal tour of Pakistan. He hosted the couple alongside his wife Joanna Drew (left)

The Duke and Duchess of Cambridge speak with guests as they attend a reception in Islamabad, Pakistan last night

The Duke and Duchess of Cambridge speak with guests as they attend a reception in Islamabad, Pakistan last night 

The Duke and Duchess beam as they arrive at the reception hosted by the British High Commissioner to Pakistan last night

The Duke and Duchess beam as they arrive at the reception hosted by the British High Commissioner to Pakistan last night

Kate arrives in a glittery dress

Kate and William met figures from business, the creative arts, music and film industry, and members of Government

Kate and William met figures from business, the creative arts, music and film industry, and members of Government

The Duchess smiles as she arrives with Prince William for the event hosted by the British High Commissioner last night

The Duchess smiles as she arrives with Prince William for the event hosted by the British High Commissioner last night

Kate steps out of a rickshaw in Islamabad last night

The Duchess arrives by Tuk Tuk as she attends a reception hosted by the British High Commissioner Thomas Drew

The Duchess arrives by Tuk Tuk as she attends a reception hosted by the British High Commissioner Thomas Drew

Tuk Tuks: Three-wheeled taxis seen in Africa and Asia... and also Bond 

While tuk tuks are most commonly seen in crowded cities of Asia and Africa, they originate in their current form from shortly after the Second World War.

The vehicles were designed by the same engineer behind the Vespa motor scooter, and soon became popular on cramped roads thanks to their compact size.

The vehicle famously featured in 1983 film Octopussy, which saw it involved in a classic James Bond chase scene through the streets of Udaipur in India.

The tuk tuk chase scene in the 1983 Bond film Octopussy

The tuk tuk chase scene in the 1983 Bond film Octopussy

The vehicle was built upon the frame of a 1982 Honda 250R ATC three-wheeler, and featured in the film when 007, played by Roger Moore, had just beaten the exiled Afghan prince in a game of backgammon.

In May this year, a freight firm boss from Essex set a new tuk tuk land speed record, having purchased the three-wheeled vehicle during a 'boozy night on eBay'.

Matt Everard, 46, of Billericay, set a speed of 74.306mph in the 1971 Bangkok taxi in North Yorkshire, having been set a target of 68.35mph by Guinness World Records.

The Duke also raised the issue of climate change in his speech, saying that the country's glaciers were under threat and as a result its water supply. 

'For a country so young, Pakistan has endured many hardships, with countless lives lost to terror and hatred. Tonight I want to pay tribute to all those who have endured such sacrifice and helped to build the country that we see today,' he said.

'Whether in Pakistan or the UK or elsewhere on our planet – we face shared global challenges. The effects of climate change threaten the present and the future – and therefore demand a concerted effort by everyone.

'In Pakistan, your spectacular glaciers – and those of the wider Hindu Kush-Himalaya region – serve as a critical water store for a quarter of a billion people; and over 1.6 billion people rely on the great rivers that flow from the mountains in this part of the world.

'Yet, because the effects of global warming at altitude, a one and a half degree Celsius temperature increase overall could mean warming of over two degrees Celsius for northern Pakistan's highest mountains.

'This could lead to a loss of over a third of these vital glaciers in less than a century, with enormous impacts not only on the availability of water, but on agriculture and hydropower generation.'

The second in line to the throne's sherwani buttoned coat was by Karachi-based designer Naushemian, while Kate wowed in a Jenny Packham dress in the national colours of dark green and Onitaa earrings, sourced from Pakistan. William also sported a pair of cashmere slippers made by Arthur Sleep at its factory in London.

Kate's £290 earrings were gold plated with uncut crystal stones and were made especially for the duchess. 

Their tuk tuk arrival did cause some issues however, with drivers in Islamabad taking to Twitter to report a blockage of key roads tonight to allow the royals free passage across the city, with videos showing huge jams that left families stuck in their cars during rush hour.  

The couple met with well-known individuals from business, the creative arts, music and film industry, and members of Government at the monument on the western Shakarparian Hills.

The event showcased Pakistani music and culture, and a speech by the Duke showed the UK's support for the Commonwealth country, which he called a 'key partner and friend'.  

The Duchess of Cambridge speaks to guests as she attends the special reception at the Pakistan National Monument yesterday

The Duchess of Cambridge speaks to guests as she attends the special reception at the Pakistan National Monument yesterday

The Duke and Duchess of Cambridge arrived at a reception at Pakistan's historic national monument last night

The Duke and Duchess of Cambridge arrived at a reception at Pakistan's historic national monument last night

The reception in Islamabad last night highlighted the relationship between the UK and the Commonwealth country

Kate arrives in a glittering dress for the reception last night

The reception in Islamabad last night highlighted the relationship between the UK and the Commonwealth country 

The Duchess of Cambridge looks back at the driver after arriving by rickshaw with her husband Prince William tonight

The Duchess of Cambridge looks back at the driver after arriving by rickshaw with her husband Prince William tonight

Kate and Prince William arrive by motorised rickshaw as they attend the special reception in Islamabad today

Kate and Prince William arrive by motorised rickshaw as they attend the special reception in Islamabad today

The couple will have the opportunity to meet with well-known individuals from business and the creative arts tonight

Kate and William walk together at the event tonight

The couple will have the opportunity to meet with well-known individuals from business and the creative arts tonight

The Duke is due to speak at the event, where the couple will have the opportunity to meet with well-known individuals

The Duke is due to speak at the event, where the couple will have the opportunity to meet with well-known individuals

The couple drove up to the reception tonight in a motorised rickshaw which had been decorated to mark the royal visit

The couple drove up to the reception tonight in a motorised rickshaw which had been decorated to mark the royal visit

The Duchess of Cambridge dazzles in a bottle green evening gown as she and Prince William arrive in Islamabad tonight

The Duchess of Cambridge dazzles in a bottle green evening gown as she and Prince William arrive in Islamabad tonight

The couple arrive in the rickshaw before William makes a keynote speech at the event in Islamabad tonight

The couple arrive in the rickshaw before William makes a keynote speech at the event in Islamabad tonight

Kate wears a dress in the national colours of dark green by Jenny Packham

William sports a sherwani buttoned coat

Kate wears a dress in the national colours of dark green by Jenny Packham, while William sports a sherwani buttoned coat 

William is due at the event to describe Britain's support for Pakistan's frontline role in the fight against terrorism

William is due at the event to describe Britain's support for Pakistan's frontline role in the fight against terrorism

Kate and William arrive for the reception hosted by the British High Commissioner Thomas Drew in Islamabad today

Kate and William arrive for the reception hosted by the British High Commissioner Thomas Drew in Islamabad today

The reception in Islamabad tonight comes on the second day of the royal tour carried out by the Cambridges to Pakistan

 The reception in Islamabad tonight comes on the second day of the royal tour carried out by the Cambridges to Pakistan

The Duke of Cambridge steps out of the rickshaw as he and his wife Kate attend a reception in Islamabad tonight

The Duke of Cambridge steps out of the rickshaw as he and his wife Kate attend a reception in Islamabad tonight

The royal couple are on an official five-day visit to Pakistan, which is the first royal visit to the country in 13 years

The royal couple are on an official five-day visit to Pakistan, which is the first royal visit to the country in 13 years

The Duke and Duchess of Cambridge arrive for the reception hosted by the British High Commissioner Thomas Drew tonight

The Duke and Duchess of Cambridge arrive for the reception hosted by the British High Commissioner Thomas Drew tonight

The Duke and Duchess at the reception hosted by the British High Commissioner to Pakistan Thomas Drew tonight

The Duke and Duchess at the reception hosted by the British High Commissioner to Pakistan Thomas Drew tonight

Drivers in Islamabad took to Twitter to report a blockage of key roads tonight to allow the royals free passage across the city, with videos showing huge jams that left families stuck in their cars during rush hour

Prince William's keynote speech in full: Duke of Cambridge tells reception that Pakistan can rely on Britain as 'a key partner and your friend'

Assalam O Alaikum. Thank you Tom for that kind introduction.

Ladies and gentlemen, it is our great pleasure to join you here this evening on our first official visit to Pakistan.

Already, Catherine and I have been honoured by the hospitality you have shown us, and we have certainly managed to make our way through a record breaking amount of food so generously offered by our hosts.

I would like to begin by saying bahut shukriya to you all for making us so welcome in your country.

Stood here with this magnificent monument behind me, I am struck by the great strides Pakistan has made since its birth seventy-two years ago.

The view from this hill would have been quite different when my grandmother, The Queen, first visited over half a century ago.

Looking out, one would have seen the beginnings of a city under construction, yet to become the great capital that it is today.

In his address to the reception, arranged to showcase the best of Pakistani culture, the duke recognised the troubled past of Pakistan. 

In his address to the reception, arranged to showcase the best of Pakistani culture, the duke recognised the troubled past of Pakistan. 'Delivering a future where Pakistan's great potential can be realised will not be easy or without sacrifice,' he said.

And with successive visits by my mother and my father, this view has continued to change, with the city constantly growing and with it my family's affection for Pakistan.

This is the world's sixth largest country by population. It has an unbelievably diverse geography that spans deserts to glaciers and everything in between. It is the birth place of the youngest ever Nobel peace prize winner. And I am told that it hosts not just the second highest mountain in the world, but also its highest cash machine!

It is also home to one of the youngest populations in the world, with an average age of just 24 – almost half that of the UK.

In a public school not far from where we gather this evening, Catherine and I saw young children learning and playing, aided by an inspiring teacher, trained through the Teach for Pakistan programme.

We spoke with ambitious young women finishing their schooling and planning for university and work. As Muhammed Ali Jinnah said, 'No struggle can ever succeed without women participating side by side with men'.

It was good to hear from President Alvi and Prime Minster Khan, earlier today that education will continue to be an important priority for Pakistan.

We also saw the brilliant work taking place in the Margalla Hills, where young children were being taught the importance of protecting and caring for the world around them.

The education of Pakistan's next generation will be the key that turns the country's growing population into an engine of growth and helps unlock this country's enormous potential. A rapidly growing population presents you with an enormous opportunity, but also significant challenge.

During his keynote speech, Prince William highlighted the relationship between the UK and Pakistan - and also referred to when his grandmother the Queen (picture during a visit to Karachi in 1961) visited more than fifty years ago

During his keynote speech, Prince William highlighted the relationship between the UK and Pakistan - and also referred to when his grandmother the Queen (picture during a visit to Karachi in 1961) visited more than fifty years ago

The UK and Pakistan share unique bonds and so it will always be in our best interests for you to succeed. Not least because of the 1.5 million people living in the UK with Pakistani origin and the fact that the UK is one of the biggest investors in your economy.

You can rely on us to keep playing an important role as a key partner and your friend.

Delivering a future where Pakistan's great potential can be realised will not be easy or without sacrifice.

For a country so young, Pakistan has endured many hardships, with countless lives lost to terror and hatred. Tonight I want to pay tribute to all those who have endured such sacrifice and helped to build the country that we see today.

Whether in Pakistan or the UK or elsewhere on our planet – we face shared global challenges. The effects of climate change threaten the present and the future – and therefore demand a concerted effort by everyone.

In Pakistan, your spectacular glaciers – and those of the wider Hindu Kush-Himalaya region – serve as a critical water store for a quarter of a billion people; and over 1.6 billion people rely on the great rivers that flow from the mountains in this part of the world.

Yet, because the effects of global warming at altitude, a one and a half degree Celsius temperature increase overall could mean warming of over two degrees Celsius for northern Pakistan's highest mountains.

This could lead to a loss of over a third of these vital glaciers in less than a century, with enormous impacts not only on the availability of water, but on agriculture and hydropower generation.

Tomorrow we will be seeing some of these impacts first hand and meeting some of the communities adjusting to the new realities and new challenges that climate change has brought to their towns and villages. I hope to learn what more we all can do to help prevent and mitigate this impending global catastrophe.

Ladies and gentlemen, given the scale and complexities of the challenges that future generations will face, it is clear that we all need to work together. And whether it's this generation or the next, I know that the UK and Pakistan will continue to exemplify the very best in international cooperation.

Yes, the challenges ahead are great. But we cannot be daunted, nor distracted. Instead we should draw strength from our shared bonds and heed the words of Muhammed Ali Jinnah as we do so, 'My message to you all' he said 'is of hope, courage, and confidence'. 

Earlier, the Duke shared a touching exchange with schoolgirls in Pakistan about their love for his late mother Princess Diana today as he also met the country's Prime Minister on a royal tour with wife Kate. 

The couple visited the Islamabad Model College for Girls in the capital, touring classrooms and posing for a group picture with some of the young students, ranging from kindergarten age students to sixth formers.

William was told the girls were 'big fans of your mother'. He gave a broad smile and said: 'You were, really? Oh that's very sweet of you. I was a big fan of my mother too. She came here three times. I was very small.'

The couple later had lunch with Prime Minister Imran Khan, with William changing into a smart suit, and Kate wearing trousers by Maheen Khan, a tunic by Catherine Walker, a scarf by Satrangi and earrings by Zeen.   

The five-day visit to Pakistan, following in Diana's footsteps in 1997, is designed to champion the importance of quality education, and highlight how girls benefit from pursuing higher education and professional careers. 

The visit is the first time a Royal Family member has set foot in Pakistan for 13 years due to violence and terrorism that has blighted the country, including the assassination of former prime minister Benazir Bhutto in 2007.

Former international cricketer Mr Khan was a friend of Diana, Princess of Wales - who visited a cancer hospital in Lahore as a guest of him and his then wife, Jemima Goldsmith, in May 1997, just three months before her death.

The Duke and Duchess of Cambridge visit the Prime Minister of Pakistan, Imran Khan, in central Islamabad today

The Duke and Duchess of Cambridge visit the Prime Minister of Pakistan, Imran Khan, in central Islamabad today

The Duchess of Cambridge laughs while playing a game with pupils at the Islamabad Model College for Girls today

The Duchess of Cambridge laughs while playing a game with pupils at the Islamabad Model College for Girls today

William and Kate meet the President of Pakistan Arif Alvi and his wife Samina at the Presidential Palace in Islamabad today

William and Kate meet the President of Pakistan Arif Alvi and his wife Samina at the Presidential Palace in Islamabad today

The couple are visiting the Islamabad Model College for Girls in the capital, touring classrooms and posing for a group picture with some of the young students, ranging from kindergarten age students to sixth formers

The couple are visiting the Islamabad Model College for Girls in the capital, touring classrooms and posing for a group picture with some of the young students, ranging from kindergarten age students to sixth formers

The couple are visiting the Islamabad Model College for Girls in the capital, touring classrooms and posing for a group picture with some of the young students, ranging from kindergarten age students to sixth formers

Kate looked relaxed as she stepped out of the royal car wearing a stunning blue traditional kurta and a pair of nude heels

Kate looked relaxed as she stepped out of the royal car wearing a stunning blue traditional kurta and a pair of nude heels 

The Duke and Duchess of Cambridge pose for a group photo as they visit a school today in Islamabad, Pakistan

The Duke and Duchess of Cambridge pose for a group photo as they visit a school today in Islamabad, Pakistan

The Duke and Duchess of Cambridge visit the Prime Minister of Pakistan Imran Khan in central Islamabad today

The Duke and Duchess of Cambridge visit the Prime Minister of Pakistan Imran Khan in central Islamabad today

Princess Diana poses with Education Minister for Punjab Province Iqbal Chaudhary (second left), Jemima Khan, holding her son Sulaiman Isa, son of Jemima and Imran Khan, and her former husband, Imran (right), at Lahore Airport in Pakistan in 1997

Princess Diana poses with Education Minister for Punjab Province Iqbal Chaudhary (second left), Jemima Khan, holding her son Sulaiman Isa, son of Jemima and Imran Khan, and her former husband, Imran (right), at Lahore Airport in Pakistan in 1997

Who is Maheen Khan? Pakistan Week boss who designed Kate's kurta for historic trip 

The Duchess visits Margalla Hills in Islamabad today

The Duchess visits Margalla Hills in Islamabad today

Kate dazzled crowds as she stepped out in a traditional blue kurta and scarf by Maheen Khan, an international Pakistani designer and costume designer.

The kurta is a long loose-fitting collarless shirt, with the style originating in India. The clothing has its roots in Central Asian nomadic tunics.

Ms Khan opened her first shop in Lahore, 'The Seamstress', in 1972 and has since taken part in 20 international shows.

She is the chief executive of Pakistan Week and has had her collections featured at Milan Week as well.

Designer Maheen Khan, at Pakistan Week in 2009

Ms Khan was recently dubbed the 'Coco Chanel of the East' and is renowned for her flattering cuts and mastery of the use of chiffon.

She was commissioned by Harrods to make a replica of the Queen's coronation dress for the 60th anniversary celebrations, but ultimately it wasn't used so she presented it to the British High Commission in Karachi instead.

The Duke reminded Mr Khan how the then cricketer told him he wanted to be Pakistan's Prime Minister years ago. 

William recalled how everyone laughed at a gathering in Richmond-upon-Thames in 1996 when the former Sussex and Worcestershire cricketer announced his political ambition to the then teenage Prince William and Diana.

Diana had taken him to see Mr Khan and his then wife, Jemima Goldsmith, at the Goldsmith family home in Richmond.

Mr Khan, who was finally elected Pakistani Prime Minister in July 2018, suggested it had been as hard a slog as his earlier career as a Test cricketer.

'When I went with my mother to see a Test match my cousin was playing and he scored a century and I told my mother I wanted to be a Test cricketer,' he said.

' I never realised how difficult it was to eventually become one. Similarly, when I told you that I wanted to succeed I didn't realise it would take me 22 years.'

William, 37, replied: 'Sure. It's not so easy.'

His wife Kate, who was wearing white trousers by the Pakistani designer Maheen Khan, an emerald green tunic by Catherine Walker and a navy patterned scarf by Satrangi, another local designer, and earrings by the Pakistani firm Zeen, interjected: 'You stuck with it.'

The Prime Minister was recalling his friendship with Diana when journalists were allowed into his chamber for a few seconds to see the royal couple meeting him today at his official residence in Islamabad.

They spoke about one of the places that the royal couple will visit tomorrow - the destination is currently under wraps - and Mr Khan said he thought Diana might have been there before.

Mr Khan, who was married to Jemima Goldsmith between 1995 and 2004, uses the residence - known simply as The Prime Minister's House, for official entertaining but actually lives in his private house on the outskirts of the capital.

The Oxford-educated politician studied politics, philosophy, and economics at Keble College in the city of dreaming spurs between 1972 and 1975 before becoming a professional cricketer. 

Prince William smiles as he speaks to with the Prime Minister of Pakistan in central Islamabad today

Prince William smiles as he speaks to with the Prime Minister of Pakistan in central Islamabad today

William and Kate meet with Prime Minister Imran Khan

William and Kate have lunch with Mr Khan in Islamabad today

William and Kate meet with Prime Minister Imran Khan before having lunch with him in Islamabad today

Pakistan's Prime Minister Imran Khan welcomes Prince William and Kate to his residence in Islamabad today

Pakistan's Prime Minister Imran Khan welcomes Prince William and Kate to his residence in Islamabad today

William and Kate meet with Prime Minister Imran Khan

William and Kate have lunch with Mr Khan in Islamabad today

William and Kate meet with Prime Minister Imran Khan before having lunch with him in Islamabad today

They spoke about one of the places that the royal couple will visit tomorrow, but the destination is currently under wraps

They spoke about one of the places that the royal couple will visit tomorrow, but the destination is currently under wraps

The Duke and Duchess of Cambridge greet Prime Minister of Pakistan Imran Khan after arriving for a meeting today

The Duke and Duchess of Cambridge greet Prime Minister of Pakistan Imran Khan after arriving for a meeting today

The Duke of Cambridge reminded Mr Khan how the then cricketer told him he wanted to be Pakistan’s Prime Minister

William and Kate at the residence today

The Duke of Cambridge reminded Mr Khan how the then cricketer told him he wanted to be Pakistan's Prime Minister

Mr Khan uses the residence for official entertaining but actually lives in his private house on the outskirts of the capital

Mr Khan uses the residence for official entertaining but actually lives in his private house on the outskirts of the capital

Kate wears white trousers by the Pakistani designer Maheen Khan

Kate wore an emerald green tunic by Catherine Walker today

Kate wears white trousers by the Pakistani designer Maheen Khan and an emerald green tunic by Catherine Walker today

The visit came more than a year after Mr Khan was finally elected Pakistani Prime Minister in July 2018

The visit came more than a year after Mr Khan was finally elected Pakistani Prime Minister in July 2018

Kate leaves after meeting Pakistan's Prime Minister Imran Khan

Kate walks down the stairs of the official residence of Imran Khan

Kate leaves after meeting Pakistan's Prime Minister Imran Khan at his official residence in Islamabad today

Mr Khan suggested that becoming prime minister had been as hard a slog as his earlier career as a Test cricketer

Mr Khan suggested that becoming prime minister had been as hard a slog as his earlier career as a Test cricketer

From cricket legend to Pakistan's PM: How Imran Khan became leader of his home nation 

Pakistan's Prime Minister Imran Khan in Islamabad today

Pakistan's Prime Minister Imran Khan in Islamabad today

Former Pakistan international cricket captain Imran Khan was elected as prime minister of the country in July 2018

Mr Khan had been pursuing power in his homeland since leaving London in 1996 to enter politics, putting such a strain on his marriage to the British heiress Jemima Goldsmith that they divorced in 2004 after nine years together.

The Oxford-educated former London playboy pledged to build a 'new Pakistan' when he addressed the nation on TV following his victory.

He also vowed to tackle corruption that was 'eating our country like a cancer', pledged good ties with neighbour India and said he would seek 'a more equal relationship' with the US.

His election victory followed a tumultuous campaign - capped by a suicide bomber killing 31 at a ballot booth on polling day – which was also marred by reports of meddling and intimidation by the military.

Known mainly in the West as a talented sportsman and infamous playboy, he presented a significantly more conservative and devout face to Muslim-majority Pakistan.

His Pakistan Tehreek-e-Insaf (PTI) party, founded in 1996, governed northwestern Khyber-Pakhtunkhwa province for five years but had to settle for a handful of seats nationally after the 2013 election.

However, he took advantage of the fall of Nawaz Sharif and a poor campaign by the Pakistan Muslim League-Nawaz (PML-N) to become prime minister last year.

He comes from a family of distinguished sportsmen: eight of his cousins have played first class cricket and two of them, Javed Burki and Majid Khan were also leading lights of the national Test team.

William and Kate and their entourage stayed at the residence for lunch. 

The couple also met with President Arif Alvi who recalled how as a boy he ran along a street in Karachi to catch a glimpse of the Queen during her 1961 state visit to his country. 'It was miraculous to see her' he said.

William and Kate joined President Arif Alvi, first lady Samina Alvi, the foreign minister Shah Mehmood Qureshi and his wife Mehreen, at the Presidential Palace in Islamabad.

William spoke of the Prince of Wales's visit to Pakistan in 2006, while the duchess sat and chatted with the first lady, who asked her about their first engagement of the day at the Islamabad Modern College for Girls. 'It's really great, a very positive environment for children,' Kate said.

During their meeting, the President and first lady also exchanged gifts with William and Kate.

Earlier, at the school, Kate dazzled crowds as she stepped out in a traditional blue kurta and scarf by local designer Maheen Khan, while William opted for a casual shirt and trousers to stay cool in the Pakistan heat. 

The Cambridges pulled up tiny chairs so they could sit and chat to pupils in their classroom at the school, which also teaches young boys - and they also used the occasion to talk about the importance of mental health.

Sitting in the classroom with a group of teenagers, Prince William - who will, of course, be king one day - was asked what he had wanted to do when he was younger after Aima, 14, told him that she wanted to be a brain surgeon. 

He said: 'Actually I changed a lot as I got older but I always wanted to learn to fly. I was flying for a while actually. 

'I love flying, I feel very free, I like learning a skill, I enjoy that. I can relate the science of what you do.' 

William recalled at the meeting today how everyone laughed in 1996 when Mr Khan announced his political ambitions

William and Kate leave following their meeting today

William recalled at the meeting today how everyone laughed in 1996 when Mr Khan announced his political ambitions

The Duke and Duchess of Cambridge smile during their visit today to the Prime Minister of Pakistan, Imran Khan

The Duke and Duchess of Cambridge smile during their visit today to the Prime Minister of Pakistan, Imran Khan 

Prince William and Kate leave after meeting Pakistan's Prime Minister Imran Khan at his official residence today

Prince William and Kate leave after meeting Pakistan's Prime Minister Imran Khan at his official residence today

Mr Khan had been pursuing power in his homeland since leaving London in 1996 to enter politics

William and Kate with Mr Khan

Mr Khan, pictured today, had been pursuing power in his homeland since leaving London in 1996 to enter politics

Mr Khan is known mainly in the West as a talented sportsman for Pakistan and an infamous Oxford-educated playboy

Mr Khan is known mainly in the West as a talented sportsman for Pakistan and an infamous Oxford-educated playboy

The Duke and Duchess of Cambridge leave after meeting Pakistan's Prime Minister Imran Khan at his official residence today

The Duke and Duchess of Cambridge leave after meeting Pakistan's Prime Minister Imran Khan at his official residence today

Prince William, Duke of Cambridge meets the President of Pakistan, Dr Arif Alvi, at the Presidential Palace in Islamabad today

Prince William, Duke of Cambridge meets the President of Pakistan, Dr Arif Alvi, at the Presidential Palace in Islamabad today

The Duchess of Cambridge stands next to Samina Alvi, wife of the President of Pakistan

Kate at the Presidential Palace today

The Duchess of Cambridge stands next to Samina Alvi, wife of the President of Pakistan, at the Presidential Palace today

The Duchess of Cambridge smiles as she meets with the President of Pakistan at the Presidential Palace in Islamabad today

The Duchess of Cambridge smiles as she meets with the President of Pakistan at the Presidential Palace in Islamabad today

President Arif Alvi who recalled how as a boy he ran along a street in Karachi to catch a glimpse of the Queen during her 1961 state visit to his country (pictured). 'It was miraculous to see her' he said

President Arif Alvi who recalled how as a boy he ran along a street in Karachi to catch a glimpse of the Queen during her 1961 state visit to his country (pictured). 'It was miraculous to see her' he said

The Queen's two trips to Pakistan: Monarch toured streets in open-top car in 1961... but her 1997 visit proved controversial 

Queen Elizabeth II in 1961 at a costume parade in Karachi

Queen Elizabeth II in 1961 at a costume parade in Karachi

The Queen has made two visits to Pakistan - with her first in 1961 a triumphal trip which saw huge crowds gather as she was driven through the streets of Lahore and Karachi.

She shook hands with members of Pakistan's cricket team after a match against England, attended a gala wearing a fabulous ball gown and met the then-president Muhammad Ayub Khan.

Her last visit to Pakistan in 1997 was rather more controversial, when she called on Pakistan and India to settle their differences during an address to the country's parliament.

But she also swapped white-heeled shoes for navy blue socks when she visited the Faisal Mosque in Islamabad to show her respect.

That visit came less than two months after Diana's death and the Queen paid tribute to the Princess of Wales's charity work in Pakistan in a speech.

Inside the school the couple first sat with a group of kindergarten children, aged around four, as they learnt about numbers and counting under a sign which read: Work Hard, Be Smart.

'Well done, very good,' said the prince, who introduced himself by shaking each of their hands, as they chatted. 

They also met a class of youngsters aged 10 to 12 who were told by their teacher: 'We have some guests in our class, can we welcome them?'

'Hello, welcome, nice to meet you,' the children chorused. 

In the science room, William and Kate chatted at length with a group of 14-year-olds wearing headscarves. 'This is the science class, yes? Some of the girls were saying that science is their favourite subject at school,' asked the duchess.

William added: 'Do you remember the periodic table? I know that a long time ago, but Catherine you remember it well, don't you?'

'Do you get to do a lot of experiments?' Kate asked, 'your English is all so good.' 

Her husband added: 'We are trying to learn Urdu as we go on, we only know a few words now, but we hope to get better. ' 

Asked by the chattering group of girls what they thought of Pakistan so far, Kate beamed and replied: 'It's fantastic, this is only day one for us. We are going to the north so we will be interested to explore see the difference.'

'Are you enjoying it?' they asked the prince. 

The Duke of Cambridge spoke about the importance of young people learning about mental health in Islamabad today

William and Kate on their tour of Pakistan today

The Duke of Cambridge spoke about the importance of young people learning about mental health in Islamabad today

The Duke and Duchess of Cambridge visit Islamabad Model College for Girls today during their tour of Pakistan

The Duke and Duchess of Cambridge visit Islamabad Model College for Girls today during their tour of Pakistan

Kate looked happy and relaxed as she chatted to children in the classroom. Her own children are at school in London

Kate looked happy and relaxed as she chatted to children in the classroom. Her own children are at school in London

Kate stunned in a traditional blue kurta and scarf made by the CEO of Pakistan Fashion Week Maheen Khan

Hi! The Cambridges were delighted to meet children as they lined up to greet them in the playground in Islamabad

The Cambridges were delighted to meet children as they lined up to greet them in the playground in Islamabad 

Kate watches the children playing in the playground at the Islamabad Model College for Girls in the Pakistani capital

Kate watches the children playing in the playground at the Islamabad Model College for Girls in the Pakistani capital 

The Duchess of Cambridge looked delighted as she arrived at the Model College for Girls and was greeted by pupils and staff

There were big smiles as Kate arrived at the school this morning

The Duchess of Cambridge looked delighted as she arrived at the Model College for Girls and was greeted by pupils and staff

The Duchess of Cambridge interacts with a student at a school on a visit to Islamabad in Pakistan today

The Duchess of Cambridge interacts with a student at a school on a visit to Islamabad in Pakistan today

The Duchess of Cambridge speaks to pupils at the Islamabad Model College for Girls during her visit today

The Duchess of Cambridge speaks to pupils at the Islamabad Model College for Girls during her visit today

Prince William and his wife Kate speak to a woman while they visit a school today in Islamabad, Pakistan

Prince William and his wife Kate speak to a woman while they visit a school today in Islamabad, Pakistan

ISLAMABAD, PAKISTAN - OCTOBER 15:T(Photo by Ian Vogler - Pool/Getty Images)

The Duchess of Cambridge visits a school in Islamabad, Pakistan, as she interacts with the pupils there

The Duke of Cambridge spoke about the importance of young people learning about mental health in Pakistan today

The Duke of Cambridge spoke about the importance of young people learning about mental health in Pakistan today

William and Kate visit a government-run school in Islamabad today during their five-day royal tour of Pakistan

William and Kate visit a government-run school in Islamabad today during their five-day royal tour of Pakistan

The visit today marks the start of the royal couple's first full day of engagements after arriving in Pakistan yesterday

The visit today marks the start of the royal couple's first full day of engagements after arriving in Pakistan yesterday

William has frequently spoken out on mental health, and did so again today during his visit to Islamabad

 William has frequently spoken out on mental health, and did so again today during his visit to Islamabad

Kate opted for a royal blue kurta, a traditional long shift blouse over trousers, for the visit to Islamabad today

Kate opted for a royal blue kurta, a traditional long shift blouse over trousers, for the visit to Islamabad today

The royals also met a group of teenagers today, and William was asked what he had wanted to do when he was younger

The royals also met a group of teenagers today, and William was asked what he had wanted to do when he was younger

Both of the royals sat with children in a kindergarten class during the visit to the school in Islamabad today

Both of the royals sat with children in a kindergarten class during the visit to the school in Islamabad today

The school visited by Prince William today is for the most disadvantaged young people in the area

The school visited by Prince William today is for the most disadvantaged young people in the area

The Duchess of Cambridge claps as she visits a school to speak with young children in Islamabad today

The Duchess of Cambridge claps as she visits a school to speak with young children in Islamabad today

William and Kate heard today how students in Islamabad are benefiting from the Teach For Pakistan programme

William and Kate heard today how students in Islamabad are benefiting from the Teach For Pakistan programme

The Duchess of Cambridge visits a school in Islamabad today as she plays a cup-based game with a little boy

The Duchess of Cambridge visits a school in Islamabad today as she plays a cup-based game with a little boy

The duke spoke of the UK's aim of teaching young people about mental health during his visit to Islamabad today

The duke spoke of the UK's aim of teaching young people about mental health during his visit to Islamabad today

The Duchess of Cambridge smiles as she interacts with a young boy during a visit to a school in Islamabad today

The Duchess of Cambridge smiles as she interacts with a young boy during a visit to a school in Islamabad today

The Duke and Duchess of Cambridge spoke to girls at the government-run school in Islamabad today

The Duke and Duchess of Cambridge spoke to girls at the government-run school in Islamabad today

Prince William holds the hand of a little boy as a girl watches on at Islamabad Model College for Girls in Pakistan today

 Prince William holds the hand of a little boy as a girl watches on at Islamabad Model College for Girls in Pakistan today

The Duchess of Cambridge smiles and laughs as she visits a school in Islamabad with Prince William today

The Duchess of Cambridge smiles and laughs as she visits a school in Islamabad with Prince William today

The Duke and Duchess of Cambridge listen as they speak to teenagers in Islamabad during their visit to Pakistan today

The Duke and Duchess of Cambridge listen as they speak to teenagers in Islamabad during their visit to Pakistan today

Prince William and the Duchess of Cambridge visit a government-run school on their trip to to Pakistan today

Prince William and the Duchess of Cambridge visit a government-run school on their trip to to Pakistan today

The Duchess of Cambridge visits a school in Islamabad as she plays a cup-based game with a young boy

The Duchess of Cambridge visits a school in Islamabad as she plays a cup-based game with a young boy

The Duchess of Cambridge smiles today as she visits a government-run school which educates students in Islamabad

The Duchess of Cambridge smiles today as she visits a government-run school which educates students in Islamabad

William wore a light blue shirt and dark trousers for the visit to the school in Islamabad today

William wore a light blue shirt and dark trousers for the visit to the school in Islamabad today

Ring of steel around Royals: How 1,000 police are protecting Kate and William during historic tour 

The visit to Pakistan by the Duke of Duchess of Cambridge has sparked a major security operation involving more than 1,000 police officers due to the

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