Your right to know: Why Australia's newspapers have been 'censored' on Monday 

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Your right to know: Why Australia's newspapers have been 'censored' on Monday Australia's media outlets have united in campaign to warn against censorship People across the nation woke to find major news outlets had been censored The push is warning against laws that allow governments to cover-up scandals Laws passed in past two decades criminalise journalism and whistle-blowing It comes after AFP raided the ABC and the home of a News Corp journalist

By Lauren Ferri For Daily Mail Australia and Australian Associated Press

Published: 23:50 BST, 20 October 2019 | Updated: 23:55 BST, 20 October 2019

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Australians woke up on Monday morning to find national and regional newspapers with heavily redacted front pages. 

The campaign is a bid to warn readers of growing censorship and attacks on press freedom by the federal government.

Print on the front pages of dozens of title mimicked a heavily censored government document, warning against creeping laws that allow elected governments to cover-up scandals and hide or restrict information.

Australia's media outlets have united in a massive campaign to issue a stark warning about growing censorship and attacks on press freedom by the federal government

Australia's media outlets have united in a massive campaign to issue a stark warning about growing censorship and attacks on press freedom by the federal government

Over the past two decades, laws have been implemented which effectively criminalise journalism and whistleblowing, even when wrongdoing or important information about government decisions are exposed.

The front pages warn federal and other governments are pursuing restrictions on news reporting, asking 'when government keeps the truth from you, what are they covering up?'.

'Australians should always be suspicious of governments that want to restrict their right to know what's going on,' News Corp Australasia's executive chairman Michael Miller said. 

Just weeks after the May federal election, federal police officers raided News Corp journalist Annika Smethurst's home over a national security story she had written more than a year earlier.

Some 88 per cent of Australians want stronger protections for whistle-blowers

Some 88 per cent of Australians want stronger protections for whistle-blowers

The next day, police raided ABC offices about another national security story two journalists had written two years earlier.

The raids made international news, but so far none of the journalists involved have been told whether or not they will face jail time for reporting in the public interest.

'This is much bigger than the media. It's about defending the basic right of every Australian to be

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