Is about to crack down on users who share logins?

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Is about to crack down on users who share logins? Streaming giant says it is 'monitoring' customers who let friends and family in different homes use their passwords 's chief product officer said it would consider ways to block the loophole But he said there were 'no big plan's to announce any changes at the moment Users must still have the flexibility to share the account in family households 

By Sam Blanchard For Mailonline

Published: 14:35 BST, 21 October 2019 | Updated: 17:34 BST, 21 October 2019

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 has revealed it is 'monitoring' people who hand out their passwords to their family and friends.

The company's chief product officer, Greg Peters, said on a vlog last week he would try to find 'consumer-friendly' ways to stop groups of people sharing one subscription.

The video-streaming service currently costs between £5.99 and £11.99, with the option to watch up to four screens at a time.

But as long as they're not all watching at the same time, more people can use the same login as long as they know the username and password.

Netflix currently limits users to watching two screens at a time on a normal subscription but, as long as they don't watch at the same time, more people can share the same login details (stock image)

currently limits users to watching two screens at a time on a normal subscription but, as long as they don't watch at the same time, more people can share the same login details (stock image)

Speaking in a video interview about 's earnings in the third quarter of 2019, Mr Peters was asked what the company planned to do about password sharing.  

He said: 'We continue to monitor it so we're looking at the situation and we'll see [whether there are] consumer-friendly ways to push on the edge of that but I think we've got no big plans to announce at this point in time of doing something differently there.'

His interviewer suggested would need to be aggressive to crack down but avoid 'alienating' its users. 

Sharing passwords among groups of people ends up leaving out of pocket because all those users are people who won't buy their own subscription.

However, the company

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