Labor review into 2019 election loss blames Bill Shorten's unpopularity but not ...

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The Labor Party has blamed Bill Shorten's unpopularity for its 2019 election loss - but denied its controversial tax policies were to blame.

Former Labor cabinet minister Craig Emerson and former South Australian premier Jay Weatherill were tasked with explaining why the ALP lost a third consecutive federal election on May 18.

This was despite Labor winning 55 Newspolls in a row and the Liberal Party changing prime minister for the third time in three years just nine months before election day. 

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The Labor Party has blamed Bill Shorten's unpopularity for its 2019 election loss - but denied its controversial tax policies were to blame (he is pictured, right, with wife Chloe on election night)

The Labor Party has blamed Bill Shorten's unpopularity for its 2019 election loss - but denied its controversial tax policies were to blame (he is pictured, right, with wife Chloe on election night)

As Opposition Leader, Mr Shorten presided over a humiliating defeat, that saw Labor lose five seats, in Queensland, Tasmania and western Sydney. 

'Labor lost the election because of a weak strategy that could not adapt to the change in Liberal leadership, a cluttered policy agenda that looked risky and an unpopular leader,' the review, released on Thursday, said.

It concluded Prime Minister Scott Morrison, who took over the Liberal leadership in August 2018, was more popular than Mr Shorten, particularly in Queensland where Labor lost two seats.

'Shorten's ratings were low, especially in Queensland, and compared unfavourably with those of Scott Morrison,' it said. 

The electoral post-mortem, however, declined to blame Labor's controversial tax policies on negative gearing and franking credits.

'Labor's tax policies did not cost the party the election,' it said.

Instead, the review blamed the 'size and complexity' of its $100billion in spending announcements.

The review argued this 'exposed Labor to a Coalition attack that fuelled anxieties among insecure, low-income couples in outer-urban and regional

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