Girl, 10, died after doctors failed to diagnose and treat a cancerous lump

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Rosie Anne Brindley developed a lump in her neck in early 2015, but medical tests failed to establish that she was suffering from Hodgkin lymphoma

Rosie Anne Brindley developed a lump in her neck in early 2015, but medical tests failed to establish that she was suffering from Hodgkin lymphoma

Doctors missed a series of chances to diagnose and treat the cancer which led to the death a 'happy and loving' 10-year-old girl, an inquest has ruled. 

Rosie Anne Brindley saw a number of GPs and specialists after she developed a lump in her neck in early 2015.

She died in July the following year after medical tests failed to establish that she was suffering from Hodgkin lymphoma. 

The undiagnosed cancer attacked Rosie's immune system, leaving her powerless against the infection septicaemia, which killed her, a coroner said at the conclusion of a four-day inquest.

The coroner at the hearing, in Rosie's home town of Loughborough, Leicestershire, urged the hospital responsible to hold an inquiry into her tragic death.

A series of medical teams examined the lump on Rosie's neck but a biopsy was not taken and MRI and ultrasound scans were 'misinterpreted'.

On the day before her death, in July 2016, Rosie went home from school feeling unwell.

Her father found her unconscious the next morning.

She was pronounced dead at home a short time later after efforts to resuscitate her proved fruitless.

Assistant coroner Tanyka Rawden said it was 'unlikely' Rosie would have died if her treatment had been different.

The girl's parents, Stefan Brindley and Samantha Rowley-Hill, said they hoped her legacy would be the prevention of further deaths.

Samantha, 42, said: 'Rosie was a very happy and loving little girl.

'We moved to Loughborough from Thurmaston four years ago and didn't know a single person.

'Within a week of moving into our house, Rosie got to know people, including some of the older people who live close by. Before we knew it, we would be walking down the street and someone would say 'you're Rosie's parents aren't you?'.

The undiagnosed cancer attacked Rosie's immune system, leaving her powerless against the infection septicaemia

Septicaemia was what killed her, a coroner said at the conclusion of a four-day inquest in Loughborough, Leicestershire

The undiagnosed cancer attacked Rosie's immune system, leaving her powerless against the infection septicaemia, which killed her, a coroner said at the conclusion of a four-day inquest in Loughborough, Leicestershire

'Even though we told her not to talk to strangers, there was something in her nature that made her want to meet people.

'She had a big heart and we miss her every day.

Stefan, 41, said: 'Rosie always wanted to help people. She always put others before herself and she never let her illness stop her.

'She was always so brave.' Ms Rawden said it was 'more likely than not' Rosie was exhibiting early symptoms of the cancer when she visited her GP in April 2015 about the lump in her neck.

At that stage, Ms Rawden said, the cancer would not have been 'extensive' or 'life-threatening.'

The girl's parents, Stefan Brindley (left) and Samantha Rowley-Hill (right), said they hoped her legacy would be the prevention of further deaths

The girl's parents, Stefan Brindley (left) and Samantha Rowley-Hill (right),

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