Numbers of elderly who don't get enough care to allow them to still live at ...

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1.5MILLION elderly people miss out on social care that could let them live at home Age UK said the total will rise to 2.1m by 2030 without urgent reforms to care The figures come from large-scale surveys and official population estimates The 1.5m estimated without adequate assistance is at one in seven over 65s

By Steve Doughty Social Affairs Correspondent For The Daily Mail

Published: 00:01 GMT, 9 November 2019 | Updated: 11:24 GMT, 9 November 2019

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The number of older people who do not receive sufficient care to allow them to live at home has reached 1.5million, analysis suggests.

Age UK said the total will rise to 2.1million by 2030 without urgent reforms to the care system.

The figures come from large-scale surveys and official population estimates, and cover over-65s who need help with daily tasks – such as getting out of bed, going to the bathroom and getting dressed – but receive either too little or none at all.

Age UK said the total will rise to 2.1million by 2030 without urgent reforms to the care system (file photo)

Age UK said the total will rise to 2.1million by 2030 without urgent reforms to the care system (file photo)

The 1.5million estimated to be without the assistance they need to continue living independently amount to one in seven of the population over the age of 65, the Age UK report said.

Help for frail or vulnerable older people living at home has been a repeated target for spending cuts over the past 15 years.

However, providing care at home is a key part of helping people retain their independence.

Moving into a care home means not only losing this but, for those with property or savings, being forced to sell off homes or surrender savings to pay the bills. 

Age UK has called for spending of an extra £8billion on adult social care over the next two years. 

It said adult social care should be paid for from general taxation, with free care for those who need it. 

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