says he would not have pardoned Bergdahl or Chelsea Manning

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President Donald has defended his pardons of three service members accused of war crimes, saying that he would not have exercised executive pardons for Army deserter Bowe Bergdahl or leaker Chelsea Manning.

'Our great warfighters must be allowed to fight. I would not have done this for Sgt. Bergdahl or Chelsea Manning!' said in a tweet on Sunday, two days after issuing three pardons of service members.

Bergdahl was demoted to private and dishonorably discharged in a 2017 court-martial for desertion of duty in Afghanistan, after unsuccessfully lobbying former President Barack Obama for a pardon. 

In his final days in office, Obama used executive clemency to commute the prison sentence of Manning, an Army soldier who was dishonorably discharged and sentenced to 35 years in prison for sharing classified military documents with WikiLeaks.

President Donald Trump defended his pardons of three service members on Friday

President Donald defended his pardons of three service members on Friday

Army deserter Bowe Bergdahl

Army leaker Chelsea Manning

said that he would not have exercised executive pardons for Army deserter Bowe Bergdahl (left) or leaker Chelsea Manning (right)

's remarks on Twitter were in response to a tweet from Fox News host Pete Hegeseth, who reportedly privately lobbied the president for pardons in three high-profile war crimes cases.

On Friday, issued the pardons for Army 1st Lt. Clint Lorance, Army Major Mathew Golsteyn, and Navy Special Warfare Operator 1st Class Edward Gallagher. 

On Friday night, Lorance, 34, embraced his beaming family members as he walked out of Leavenworth military prison in Kansas in full dress uniform , hours after his pardon.

Lorance was convicted of second-degree murder for ordering soldiers under his command to open fire on three unarmed Afghan men on motorcycles, including two who died, in 2012. He and his supporters maintain that they were enemy combatants.

He had served more than six years of a 19-year sentence at Fort Leavenworth.

Army 1st Lt. Clint Lorance, 34, embraced his beaming family members as he walked out of Leavenworth military prison in Kansas in full dress uniform on Friday night

Army 1st Lt. Clint Lorance, 34, embraced his beaming family members as he walked out of Leavenworth military prison in Kansas in full dress uniform on Friday night

Video shows the moment that Lorance stepped out of an SUV that transported him from the notorious maximum-security military prison, as his family members screamed with joy

Video shows the moment that Lorance stepped out of an SUV that transported him from the notorious maximum-security military prison, as his family members screamed with joy

Video shows the moment that Lorance stepped out of an SUV that transported him from the notorious maximum-security military prison, as his family members screamed with joy

Lorrance embraces his sister as he walked free after six years behind bars at Leavenworth

Lorrance embraces his sister as he walked free after six years behind bars at Leavenworth

Video shows the moment that Lorance stepped out of an SUV that transported him from the notorious maximum-security military prison, as his family members screamed with joy, hugged him and wiped away tears.

'It feels great,' Lorance said. 'I want to say thank you President . And I'd like to ask the rest of the country to help me do that too, to tell President thank you.'

As his sister, nieces and other family struggled to compose themselves, Lorance asked: 'I hear y'all have some pizza around here somewhere?'

'We do have pizza!' a female family members replied, as they all burst into laughter. 

Lorance then entered the hotel where a reception had been set up to greet him, and delivered brief remarks, saying that he had spoken on the phone with just prior to his release.

'He sounds just like he sounds on TV, on the phone. He's actually pretty funny too when you talk to him on the phone,' Lorance said.

Lorance was greeted by retired Lt. Col. David

Lorance was greeted by retired Lt. Col. David 'Bull' Gurfein, the CEO of United American Patriots, a group that lobbied for his pardon and release

'I just wanted to join the Army, and go be a soldier. I didn't realize all this was gonna happen, it's kind of overwhelming for a country boy from the middle of nowhere,' Lorance said

'I just wanted to join the Army, and go be a soldier. I didn't realize all this was gonna happen, it's kind of overwhelming for a country boy from the middle of nowhere,' Lorance said 

Lorance thanked all of his supporters, who had corresponded with him behind bars and petitioned for his release.

'I just wanted to join the Army, and go be a soldier. I didn't realize all this was gonna happen, it's kind of overwhelming for a country boy from the middle of nowhere,' he said.

On Saturday morning, Lorance changed his Facebook cover photo to a banner supporting 's 2020 reelection campaign. 

Lorance, an 82nd Airborne Division lieutenant, was sentenced to 19 years in prison, forfeiture of all pay and dismissal from the army after prosecutors said he recklessly ordered his men to open fire on the Afghan men in July 2012. 

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The trio on motorcycles had approached his patrol in southern Afghanistan. 

Prosecutors said this was in violation of the military's rules of engagement,

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