Tories vow to hand millions of workers a £450 tax cut

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Boris Johnson today dramatically unveiled a huge £450-a-year tax cut for millions of workers.

The PM revealed that the Tory manifesto will commit to increasing the national insurance threshold to £12,500 from the current level of £8,600.

The move would benefit everyone who earns above the threshold, and potentially cost the government around £10billion.

How would this tax cut apply to you? 

The Tories' are pledging to increase national insurance to £12,500 - but it is not clear how quickly the rise will be brought in. 

Once the policy is fully implemented, here are what different earners can expect. 

If you earn under £8,600 a year:

No change - already exempt from National Insurance

If you earn £8,600-£12,500 a year:

About £450, saving 12p on every pound you earn.  

If you earn more than £12,500 a year:

About a £450 cut in National Insurance contributions a year 

If you are self-employed: 

The threshold is expected to be raised along with the main NI rate, meaning the benefits should be the same..  

It further widens the political divide with Labour, as Jeremy Corbyn plans a massive left-wing tax and spending splurge. 

Speaking to staff at a factory on the River Tees, Mr Johnson seemed to accidentally blurt out the news as said he was determined to ensure 'low tax for working people'. 

Pressed on whether the Conservatives would help 'people like us', Mr Johnson said: 'If we look at what we're doing, and what I've said in the last few days, we're going to be cutting national insurance up to £12,000.

'We're going to be making sure that we cut business rates for small businesses. We are cutting tax for working people.'

He added: 'I don't want to be excessively political about it but I would just remind you that Jeremy Corbyn and the Labour Party would whack up borrowing and whack up spending so high that they would put a £2,400 tax burden on every family.' 

Government sources stressed the change will be 'staged' rather than an immediate hike in the threshold while Mr Johnson later confirmed the final number would be £12,500. 

If implemented, the threshold would go up to £9,500 next year before then rising further over the course of the next Parliament. 

The revelation from Mr Johnson seemed to take his aides by surprise, with the Tory manifesto due to be launched over the weekend. 

Mr Johnson gave a thumbs up as he posed with workers - and a fan - at Wilton Engineering Services in Middlesbrough

Mr Johnson gave a thumbs up as he posed with workers - and a fan - at Wilton Engineering Services in Middlesbrough

The PM revealed that the Tory manifesto will commit to increasing the national insurance threshold to £12,000 from the current level of £8,600

The PM revealed that the Tory manifesto will commit to increasing the national insurance threshold to £12,000 from the current level of £8,600

Just about everyone who has a full-time job makes National Insurance contributions. 

How does National Insurance work and how much is Boris Johnson's pledge worth to workers?

Just about everyone who has a full-time job makes National Insurance contributions. 

Introduced after the Second World War, the money was originally intended to fund things like the NHS, unemployment benefit and the state pension - although it now goes into wider government coffers. 

It is deducted from people's monthly salaries with contributions currently starting for everyone who earns more than £166 a week. 

Contributions are made at a rate of 12 per cent of earnings above the limit. 

That means that effectively people start making contributions on their annual earnings above £8,632. 

Mr Johnson is planning to increase the contributions threshold to about £12,000 - a jump of £3,368. 

That means workers stand to save approximately £400 a year under the PM's plans.   

Introduced after the Second World War, the money was originally intended to fund things like the NHS, unemployment benefit and the state pension - although it now goes into wider government coffers. 

It is deducted from people's monthly salaries with contributions currently starting for everyone who earns more than £166 a week. 

Contributions are made at a rate of 12 per cent of earnings above the limit. 

That means that effectively people start making contributions on their annual earnings above £8,632. 

Mr Johnson is planning to increase the contributions threshold to about £12,000 - a jump of £3,368. 

That means workers stand to save approximately £400 a year under the PM's plans. 

The Employment Allowance is currently claimed by over 1 million employers to reduce their employer NICs bills by up to £3,000. 

The next Conservative Government will increase the Employment Allowance to £4,000, which will provide a tax cut of up to £1,000 for more than half a million businesses. 

This will amount to almost a half a billion-pound tax cut for small businesses.  

Mr Johnson originally raised the idea of upping the threshold for NI contributions during the Conservative leadership contest last summer - although at that stage he did not put a figure on it.

The Institute for Fiscal Studies (IFS) calculated that for each £1,000 that it was raised, 600,000 workers would be lifted out of NI altogether.

Jewish campaigners accuse Corbyn of 'trying to underscore' dead paedophile 'Jeffrey Epstein's Jewishness' 

Jewish campaigners tore into Jeremy Corbyn today after he mis-pronounced the name of notorious society paedophile Jeffrey Epstein in front of millions of people on live television.

The Labour leader was accused of trying to make the American child abuser - who killed himself in prison earlier this year - sound 'more Jewish' in the ITV leaders' debate.

During the prime time show last night he called the convicted sex offender 'Epschteen', sparking fury on social media - after Boris Johnson pronounced Epstein correctly.

It came up when they were asked about the scandal surrounding Mr Epstein's friend Prince Andrew after a car-crash interview at the weekend.

If just employee and self-employed thresholds were lifted the cost to the Exchequer would be £3 billion a year rising to £4.5 billion if the employer threshold was raised as well.

To raise the threshold to £12,500 - as Mr Johnson's then leadership rival Dominic Raab was proposing - was put at £11 billion, rising to £17 billion if the employer threshold was included.

The IFS said that 2.4million workers would be taken out of NI.

During his visit today, Mr Johnson also accused Jeremy Corbyn of 'complete invention' over claims that the Tories would 'sell out' the NHS in a post-Brexit trade deal with the US.

'I was amazed by what (Jeremy Corbyn) had to say. It's a complete invention,' he said. 

The PM said the NHS is 'one of the greatest contributions this country has made to the world' before adding: 'Under no circumstances will the NHS be for sale, be on the table in any trade negotiation we do with anybody.' 

Mr Johnson said: 'There's a very clear reason why Jeremy Corbyn and the Labour Party produced this nonsense about free trade deals and the NHS, which is an absolute myth, and that's because they want to conceal the gap at the heart of their own policy on Brexit. 

'They will not level with the public about what they want to do with Brexit next year.' 

He added: 'Jeremy Corbyn wants to have a second referendum but what he won't tell you is what position he would take in that referendum - I tried to ask him last night, did you see this thing? 

'I asked him nine times, I did not get an answer, and frankly I do not see how you can lead this country if you cannot answer a very simple question - what side are you going to be on in a referendum on whether to leave or remain in the EU.'   

Speaking to staff at a factory on the River Tees, Mr Johnson said he was determined to bring in 'low tax for working people'

Speaking to staff at a factory on the River Tees, Mr Johnson said he was determined to bring in 'low tax for working people'

Debate viewers hammer Jeremy Corbyn on Brexit: 63% say Boris Johnson won EU clashes in TV showdown and just 8% of Leave voters favoured Labour leader - while the Tory leader came out as most 'prime ministerial'

Boris Johnson has emerged as the winner of the TV debate on the key Brexit battleground - as it was revealed that 6.7million people watched the historic showdown.

After the Labour leader refused nine times to say whether he backed Leave or Remain, nearly two-thirds of viewers said the PM triumphed in the clashes over EU policy. Just 27 per cent thought Mr Corbyn came out on top.

Mr Johnson was also a long way ahead on who was more 'prime ministerial' - by 54 per cent to 29 per cent, according to a snap YouGov poll in the wake of the hour-long ITV special. He was also regarded as more 'likeable' and better on government spending.

However, in a warning sign for the Tories, Mr Corbyn was seen as marginally more trustworthy - by 45 per cent to 40 per cent and much more in touch with 'ordinary people'. 

He also outperformed Mr Johnson in the NHS exchanges, by 54 per cent to 38 per cent. 

Overall the poll found the pair fought each other almost to a standstill, with 51 per cent of those surveyed saying Mr Johnson was victorious and 49 per cent Mr Corbyn. 

It was disclosed today that the ITV programme was watched by 6.7million viewers, with the peak figures coming between 8.50pm and 8.55pm - just before the start of I'm A Celebrity...  

As the campaign for the election on December 12 stepped up a gear last night, the PM insisted he was determined to 'get Brexit done', and warned that all Labour had to offer was 'dither and delay, deadlock and division' by calling a second referendum.

'We don't know on which side Mr Corbyn will campaign. Will he campaign for Leave or Remain?' he demanded, saying there was a 'void at the heart of his policy.' 

The audience in Salford laughed when Mr Corbyn claimed to have been 'clear' despite repeatedly ducking the question on which side he would support in a new ballot.    

A snap YouGov survey found 51 per cent thought Mr Johnson triumphed, with 49 per cent saying Mr Corbyn came out on top

After Jeremy Corbyn refused nine times to say whether he backed Leave or Remain, a YouGov poll found nearly two-thirds of viewers thought Boris Johnson triumphed in the clashes over EU policy. Just 27 per cent thought Mr Corbyn came out on top

After Jeremy Corbyn refused nine times to say whether he backed Leave or Remain, a YouGov poll found nearly two-thirds of viewers thought Boris Johnson triumphed in the clashes over EU policy, right. Just 27 per cent thought Mr Corbyn came out on top. In the graph on the left, 51 per cent thought Mr Johnson triumphed overall, with 49 per cent saying Mr Corbyn came out on top

The premier also laid into the veteran left-winger for doing a 'deal' with Nicola Sturgeon, saying he would need SNP support to govern - and was willing to meet their red line of allowing a new Scottish independence referendum. 

And he said there had been a 'failure in leadership' by Mr Corbyn in tackling a wave of vile anti-Semitism that has been wracking his party. 

But in bad-tempered exchanges - with each frequently being told off by presenter Julie Etchingham for overrunning their 30 seconds for an initial response to questions - Mr Corbyn said he was offering 'real change' and would deliver 'for the many'. 

He said he would negotiate another deal, a referendum would happen within six months, and he would 'implement the choice'. 

He said: 'We will negotiate an agreement and we will put that alongside Remain in a referendum and our government will abide by that result. There will be a genuine choice put before the people of Britain and we will carry that out.' 

Mr Corbyn, who appeared to be struggling with a cold, also prompted laughter when he tried to defend what Mr Johnson described as Labour's 'crackpot plan' for a four-day working week. 

Mr Corbyn said: 'It is about reducing the working week all across the economy, paid for by productivity increases all across Britain.' 

At one stage Mr Johnson quipped that the Labour leader had 'found a magic money forest' as they were both accused of splurging money. 

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However, Mr Johnson was also heckled as he insisted on turning the discussion back to Brexit at all opportunities. And the PM - who is in the process of

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