Former Amazon employee blasts Jeff Bezos' Staten Island warehouse as 'cult-like ...

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An Ex-Amazon warehouse worker has lifted the lid on her time as an employee at the e-commerce giant’s Staten Island fulfilment center, branding the Jeff Bezos-owned facility a ‘cult-like’ sweatshop run by robots.

Speaking exclusively to the NY Post, 46-year-old Maureen Donnelly said she was forced to hand in her resignation to her Amazon bosses in October last year, having enrolled in the company's ranks just one month earlier.

A former paramedic and newsroom Clerk, Donnelly insists she isn’t someone who shies away from hard work but says the conditions inside the 855,000-square-foot packing plant were simply unbearable.

‘I soon learned that only difference between an Amazon warehouse and a third-world sweatshop were the robots,’ Donnelly told the Post. ‘At Amazon, you were surrounded by bots, and they were treated better than the humans.’

Donnelly isn’t alone in her claims. On Monday, more than 100 protestors rallied in front of the building where she briefly worked, demonstrating against harsh working conditions and worryingly high rates of workplace injuries.

Adding to the company’s woes, Amazon also featured on the National Council for Occupational Safety and Health’s 2019 ‘Dirty Dozen’ list, which names and shames the nation’s most dangerous employers.

Maureen Donnelly said she was forced to hand in her resignation to her Amazon bosses in October last year, having enrolled in the company's ranks just one month earlier. A former paramedic and newsroom Clerk, Donnelly insists she isn’t someone who shies away from hard work, but she says the conditions inside the 855,000-square-foot packing plant were simply unbearable

Maureen Donnelly said she was forced to hand in her resignation to her Amazon bosses in October last year, having enrolled in the company's ranks just one month earlier. A former paramedic and newsroom Clerk, Donnelly insists she isn’t someone who shies away from hard work, but she says the conditions inside the 855,000-square-foot packing plant were simply unbearable

Donnelly isn’t alone in her claims. On Monday, more than 100 protestors rallied in front of the building where she briefly worked, demonstrating against harsh working conditions and worryingly high rates of workplace injuries

Donnelly isn’t alone in her claims. On Monday, more than 100 protestors rallied in front of the building where she briefly worked, demonstrating against harsh working conditions and worryingly high rates of workplace injuries

When Donnelly first secured her job at Amazon she says she was excited about the prospect that laid ahead, working for one of the world’s biggest companies.

She said she was impressed by the perks of the job - which she cited as: Stock shares; employee discounts; full benefits; four-day work weeks, without the obligation of large amounts of mandatory overtime – in addition to the pay, which was in excess of $16 per-hour.

But after enduring 12 hour shifts with limited breaks, sweltering temperatures and filled with 'mind numbing labour', Connelly's ardor quickly soured.

 The job crushed my spirit — and crippled my body. I would spent nearly 12 hours a day with with no one to talk to for more than five minutes. I wasn’t sleeping well. I was getting cranky with family. My knees were killing me. My back and shoulders constantly hurt. My left hip throbbed. After every shift, I’d ice my swollen ankles, which were triple the normal size

 Maureen Donnelly

While ‘enthusiastic’ Amazon recruiters bragged to Donnelley about the size of the four-story Staten Island fulfilment centre – known as JKF8 – telling her it was big enough to fit 18 football fields inside, she would soon learn the sheer size of the building would pose huge problems for the workers within.

From her first day on the job, Donnelly claims managers would regularly drum into her that Amazon is ‘the best place to work’ - later reflecting on the purported persistent reiterations to be ‘cult-like’.

She was assigned the role of a ‘stower’, who’re responsible for stocking shelves and calling racks, requiring her to work alongside ‘squat, square orange robots’ which carried eight-foot-tall yellow racks between workers across the warehouse floor.

‘The bots would whiz around to the stowers and stop. Somebody called a “water spider” would bring me boxes of items to stow. I would lift the items out of the box, scan them and put each item into a compartment in the rack,’ Donnelly explained to the Post.

‘When the rack was full, I pressed a button, and the robot would zip away with the rack, and another robot would arrive with an empty rack for me to fill.’

While ‘enthusiastic’ Amazon recruiters bragged to Donnelley about the size of the four-story Staten Island fulfilment centre – known as JKF8 – telling her it was big enough to fit 18 football fields inside, she would soon learn the sheer size of the building would pose a huge problem for the workers within

As part of the company’s rules, all employees were forced to place personal items in a locker before stepping out into the warehouse.

Among the forbidden items were headphones – cited as a safety hazard – and cellphones, which is said to have caused a number of problems for single parents with young children.

‘One single mom in her 30s with a five-year-old daughter didn’t have an emergency number she could give to her babysitting parents or her kid’s school,’ Donnelly recalled.

After stowing away the items, Donnelly says she was then forced to partake in calisthenic exercises for 10-minutes – a daily routine that left her feeling as if she’d enrolled in the Army, rather than Amazon.

Drinks were strictly forbidden from the warehouse floor, except

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