Boris Johnson finally commits to an election interview with Andrew Neil

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Boris Johnson today committed to being interviewed by Andrew Neil before the general election after a fiery showdown with the BBC's Andrew Marr. 

Mr Marr and Mr Johnson repeatedly talked over each other during their head-to-head this morning with the presenter eventually accusing the Prime Minister of 'chuntering'. 

Mr Johnson immediately hit back and slammed Mr Marr for 'interrupting' him. 

The two men clashed throughout the interview with furious exchanges on issues like terror, the NHS and the Tories' spending plans. 

Mr Johnson had reportedly been banned by the BBC from appearing on the Andrew Marr Show until he agreed to be grilled by Mr Neil before December 12. 

The BBC then backed down in the wake of the London Bridge terror attack and allowed the premier to appear without a firm commitment.

But Mr Johnson did today say he will sit down with Mr Neil as he said he was happy to face questions from 'any interviewer called Andrew from the BBC'.

However, he failed to set an exact date.  

Andrew Marr and Boris Johnson engaged in repeated angry clashes over issues like terror, prisons, the NHS and social care during an interview this morning

Andrew Marr and Boris Johnson engaged in repeated angry clashes over issues like terror, prisons, the NHS and social care during an interview this morning

Mr Johnson accused Mr Marr of repeatedly 'interrupting' him as he tried to set out the Tories' spending plans

Mr Johnson accused Mr Marr of repeatedly 'interrupting' him as he tried to set out the Tories' spending plans

Mr Johnson, pictured leaving the BBC studios in London this morning, has now committed to an interview with Andrew Neil

Mr Johnson, pictured leaving the BBC studios in London this morning, has now committed to an interview with Andrew Neil

Jeremy Corbyn says convicted terrorists should 'not necessarily' have to serve full prison terms

Jeremy Corbyn said convicted terrorists should 'not necessarily' have to serve the entirety of their prison sentences as Boris Johnson vowed to toughen up terror laws. 

The Labour leader said when convicted terrorists are let out of prison 'depends on the circumstances' as he was grilled in the aftermath of the London Bridge attack. 

Usman Khan stabbed a man and a woman to death on Friday before he was shot dead by police following his release halfway through a 16-year prison sentence for terror offences. 

Mr Johnson said scrapping early release from prison for terrorists would have stopped the attack from happening. 

The PM said this morning during an appearance on the BBC's Andrew Marr Show that it was 'ridiculous' and 'repulsive' that Khan had been released 'after serving only eight years'. 

He also revealed 'there are probably about 74' people similar to Khan who had been let out early after being convicted of terror offences and that the government had taken 'a lot of action in the last 48 hours’ to make sure they pose no threat to the public.

The Prime Minister has committed to introducing mandatory minimum sentences of 14 years for the most serious terrorist offences and he has said some offenders should never be released. 

But his approach is in stark contrast to Mr Corbyn's who told Sky News in an interview broadcast this morning that he was not against convicted terrorists being released part of the way through their sentence.  

Critics had attacked the BBC for allowing Mr Johnson on the Andrew Marr Show without a guarantee that he would subject himself to a face-to-face with Mr Neil. 

Mr Neil is due to conduct interviews with all of the main party leaders before polling day but Mr Johnson had been dodging giving a commitment to appear.  

Asked by Mr Marr if he will face Mr Neil, Mr Johnson replied: 'He couldn't have a more brilliant agent, if I may say so, than you. 

'I think what the people of this country want to know is what is our programme for government.' 

Told that it would be 'graceful and decent' to commit to an interview given that all of his rivals had done so, Mr Johnson said: 'I am perfectly happy to be interviewed by any interviewer called Andrew from the BBC.  

'I have done interviews, I did a two hour long phone in, I have done TV debates.' 

Mr Johnson's commitment to be interviewed by Mr Neil came at the end of an ill-tempered grilling from Mr Marr.  

The presenter appeared to be dissatisfied with the Prime Minister's answers to numerous questions and the two men became increasingly combative as the interview progressed. 

Things eventually came to a head when Mr Marr tried to ask Mr Johnson about his tax plans as the PM continued to answer a previous question. 

Mr Marr snapped: 'I am sorry, you just keep going on and on and on. You are chuntering. I need to ask you about the money.' 

A furious Mr Johnson then hit back and said: 'You are interrupting, if I may say so. 

'I think people might be quite interested in my answers as well as your questions but go on.' 

Jeremy Corbyn: Free movement would not 'totally' end under Labour Brexit plan

Jeremy Corbyn today said freedom of movement from the European Union would never 'totally' end under a Labour government if the UK goes ahead with its divorce from the bloc. 

His comments appear to go further than what Labour has pledged in its 2019 general election manifesto in which it said free movement would be 'subject to negotiations'. 

Meanwhile, Mr Corbyn again refused to say how he would vote at the second Brexit referendum which Labour has committed to holding if it forms a government after December 12. 

He said people would have

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