Germany plans to tighten laws against anti-Semitic hate crimes following ...

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Germany plans to tighten its laws against anti-Semitic hate crimes as Jewish people complain they 'no longer feel safe' following synagogue shooting Germany is to give heavier sentences to those committing anti-semitic offences Country's justice minister said she is 'ashamed that Jews no longer feel safe' Stephan Balliet, 27, killed two after failed attack on German synagogue in eastern city of Halle Days before, a Syrian man was stopped trying to enter another synagogue armed with a knife and shouting 'Allahu akbar'

By William Cole For Mailonline

Published: 13:59 GMT, 1 December 2019 | Updated: 14:01 GMT, 1 December 2019

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Germany will tighten its laws against anti-Semitic hate crimes following a number of incidents that have left Jewish citizens 'no longer feeling safe'.

The move comes one month after a failed attack on a synagogue by a far-Right gunman who later killed two people.

Justice Minister Christine Lambrecht told parliament that anti-Semitism would be made an aggravating factor for hate crimes in the criminal code.

'I am ashamed that Jews no longer feel safe in Germany and that so many are even thinking of leaving the country,' said Ms Lambrecht.

Germany will tighten its laws against anti-Semitic hate crimes following a number of incidents that have left Jewish citizens 'no longer feeling safe'. Last month, German national Stephan Balliet (pictured) killed two after failed attack on German synagogue in eastern city of Halle

Germany will tighten its laws against anti-Semitic hate crimes following a number of incidents that have left Jewish citizens 'no longer feeling safe'. Last month, German national Stephan Balliet (pictured) killed two after failed attack on German synagogue in eastern city of Halle

Justice Minister Christine Lambrecht told parliament: 'I am ashamed that Jews no longer feel safe in Germany and that so many are even thinking of leaving the country'

Justice Minister Christine Lambrecht told parliament: 'I am ashamed that Jews no longer feel safe in Germany and that so many are even thinking of leaving the country'

'We have to send a clear signal against anti-Semitism.'

Under the planned changes, crimes with an anti-Semitic motive will attract heavier sentences.

The current law mentions discrimination against particular groups as an aggravating factor but does not refer to anti-Semitism specifically. 

Josef Schuster, head of the Central Council of Jews in Germany, said the change was 'an important step towards a consistent

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