Mother-of-two is raising funds for her autistic daughter's treatments with a ...

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A mother-of-two whose daughter's autism and brain damage has seen her become the victim of cruel bullies, has penned a children's book in the hopes of raising awareness among youngsters.

Emily Bunny, 25, from Marbella, Spain, whose daughter Aurora, four, was diagnosed with autism two years ago, has written children's autism awareness book Aurora's Gift, to improve how the condition is perceived.

The author gave birth to Aurora by emergency caesarean section and says her daughter showed no signs of brain damage or autism before birth.

Speaking to FEMAIL, Emily said she wants to use the money raised from the book sales to fund Aurora's treatments and therapies. 

Emily Bunny, 25, from Marbella, Spain, explained how her daughter Aurora, four, (pictured) inspired her to write children's autism awareness book Aurora's Gift

Emily Bunny, 25, from Marbella, Spain, explained how her daughter Aurora, four, (pictured) inspired her to write children's autism awareness book Aurora's Gift

Aurora is currently unable to talk, but has learnt to communicate using pictures and is in the process of learning sign language.

She said: 'Aurora was diagnosed with autism at two years old. From the age of six months, Aurora would have muscle spasms in her arms where her arms would be stuck out at a funny angle for a few seconds at a time, up to 30 times per hour. 

'At 13 months she had a developmental regression, where she stopped making eye contact.'

Emily added of her symptoms: 'She has never responded to her name, which became more noticeable as she got older, and she has never understood any words including key words such as 'mummy'. 

'She also has never been able to talk although she crawled and walked at the expected age'.

Recalling her daughter's birth, she continued: 'She suffered trauma at birth but there were no signs before birth. We didn't realise the birth trauma had affected her until she was around two years old. 

Emily (pictured) revealed that her daughter Aurora can get upset when others don't understand what she's trying to communicate

Emily (pictured) revealed that her daughter Aurora can get upset when others don't understand what she's trying to communicate

'I didn't know much about autism at all. The only awareness of autism I had was the stereotypical characters you see on TV like Sheldon Cooper from The Big Bang Theory.'

Revealing how diverse the symptoms can be, she explained: 'These characters have no relation to Aurora in any way. 

'The autism spectrum contains an incredibly diverse range of symptoms from characters like Sheldon, who can find communication and social interaction difficult but not insurmountable, to people like Aurora who are non-verbal and considered a 'flight risk'.

'This means she may run away from her carer given the opportunity) with absolutely no sense of danger. 

'Many people don't realise the width of the range on the spectrum and this can make it difficult for Aurora when people ask silly questions like 'what is her special power?'.

Emily explained that Aurora (pictured as a baby) didn't show signs of suffering from autism or brain damage until she was around two-years-old

Emily explained that Aurora (pictured as a baby) didn't show signs of suffering from autism or brain damage until she was around two-years-old 

Emily explained that her idea to write a children's awareness book was sparked by a fellow parent asking about autism. 

She said: 'One day another mum said to me 'I really hope you don't mind me asking, but I would like to explain to my child a little bit about Aurora so my child can understand what she goes through and understand her a bit better, but I'm not sure what to say'. 

'I explained to her about how Aurora can sometimes get upset when others don't understand what she would like to communicate and how she likes making friends but struggles. 

'While explaining, I realised I can't spend my whole life explaining to people, it would be much better if they already knew somehow, especially the children who otherwise get upset or angry with Aurora.

'So I came up with the idea of a story book that other children can read where the main character, Aurora, helps them to understand how life can be with autism.'

Talking about the plot, she said: 'In the book, we firstly meet Aurora. The book is written from the first person point of view, as if Aurora is writing the book herself. The book rhymes on every page which children love. 

'Aurora’s character explains how she has autism but that she still likes to do things like making friends and going to the park. The book

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