How to watch spectacular meteor shower over Australia

How to watch spectacular meteor shower over Australia  The 'king' of all meteor showers will light up the sky as it peaks on Saturday night to early Sunday morning  The Geminid is one of the most colourful meteor showers and produces the most amount of shooting stars  Astrologers advise gazers to set an alarm and wake up early depending on the peak in their state's time zone Australians can expect to see 20 to 40 per hour but those close to the northern hemisphere will see more 

By Tita Smith For Daily Mail Australia

Published: 01:28 GMT, 12 December 2019 | Updated: 01:29 GMT, 12 December 2019

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A torrent of shooting stars are set to illuminate skies above Australia this weekend as the 'king' of meteor showers creates a spectacular light show.

Those wanting to see the Geminid meteor shower will need to wake in the middle of the night to see a show of 100 to 150 shooting stars - or meteors - per hour.  

The meteor shower occurs as Earth flies through a loop of dust and debris left behind by asteroid 3200 Phaethon, with the annual shower active between December 4 and December 17.

But the main show will take place late on Saturday night into Sunday morning.   

The Geminid meteor shower (pictured in 2018 falling over China) is intensifying each year distributing a stream of coloured shooting stars across the December sky

The Geminid meteor shower (pictured in 2018 falling over China) is intensifying each year distributing a stream of coloured shooting stars across the December sky

WHEN TO WATCH THE METEOR SHOWER 

South Australia: 5.10am, Sunday

NSW: 5.40am, Sunday

Queensland: 4.40am, Sunday

Northern Territory: 4.10am, Sunday 

Western Australia: 2.40am. Sunday

The Geminids provide a colourful light display, as the passing particles are in various stages in their chemical break-down. 

The meteors travel at 20 to 30 kilometres per second - which is actually relatively slow by meteor standards - giving Aussies an opportunity to catch a longer glimpse.  

Astrophysicist Jonti Horner of the University of Southern Queensland

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