Iran's foreign minister insists they don't want a war after missile strikes

Iran's foreign minister has insisted they do not want a war despite firing more than a dozen ballistic missiles at two military bases in Iraq housing American troops in a revenge attack for the U.S. drone strike that killed their top Iranian general.  

Foreign minister Javad Zarif defended the missile strikes saying Iran took 'proportionate measures' and was only acting in 'self defense' when they struck back at the U.S.

Zarif, however, warned that Iran did not 'seek escalation or war' but vowed to continue defending themselves if the U.S. chose to retaliate.

The firing of the missiles late Tuesday was a major escalation between Iran and the U.S. and raised immediate fears that the two longtime enemies were inching closer to war.

But the response from Iran's foreign minister is one of a few indicators that there might not be further retaliation on either side - at least in the short term.

Iran's foreign minister Javad Zarif

Donald Trump

Iran's foreign minister Javad Zarif has insisted they do not want a war despite firing more than a dozen ballistic missiles at two military bases in Iraq housing American troops in a revenge attack for the killing of a top Iranian general that was ordered by Donald

Iran's foreign minister Javad Zarif warned that Iran did not 'seek escalation or war' but vowed to continue defending themselves if the U.S. chose to retaliate

Iran's foreign minister Javad Zarif warned that Iran did not 'seek escalation or war' but vowed to continue defending themselves if the U.S. chose to retaliate

It comes after President Donald Trump calmly tweeted on Tuesday night that 'all is well' shortly after the missile attacks

It comes after President Donald calmly tweeted on Tuesday night that 'all is well' shortly after the missile attacks 

It comes after President Donald calmly tweeted on Tuesday night that 'all is well' shortly after the missile attacks. 

'So far, so good' he added regarding casualties and damage. 

'Assessment of casualties & damages taking place now. So far, so good! We have the most powerful and well equipped military anywhere in the world, by far,' tweeted.

It appears to be a step back from the tense aftermath of the strikes when the Pentagon said the missiles were 'clearly launched from Iran' to target U.S. military and coalition forces and Iran's Revolutionary Guards admitted to firing the rockets in retaliation for last week's killing of Iranian general Qassem Soleimani.  

Soleimani's killing and the strikes by Iran came as tensions have been rising steadily across the Mideast ever since 's decision to unilaterally withdraw America from Tehran's nuclear deal with world powers. 

They also marked the first time in recent years that the U.S. and Iran have attacked each other directly rather than through proxies in the region.  

Iran fired more than a dozen ballistic missiles at two Iraqi bases housing American troops in a revenge attack for the U.S. drone strike that killed a top Iranian general

Iran fired more than a dozen ballistic missiles at two Iraqi bases housing American troops in a revenge attack for the U.S. drone strike that killed a top Iranian general 

An explosion is seen following missiles landing at what is believed to be Ain al-Asad Air Base in Iraq

An explosion is seen following missiles landing at what is believed to be Ain al-Asad Air Base in Iraq

The Ain al-Asad airbase in western Iraq and the Erbil base in Iraqi Kurdistan were both struck by the missiles on Tuesday at about 5.30pm (EST)

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