Woman who claims she was rushed into taking 'experimental' puberty-blocking ...

A woman who claims she was given 'experimental' puberty-blocking drugs at 16 without being warned of the consequences is set to lead as a witness in a landmark case. 

The Tavistock and Portman NHS Trust, which runs the UK's first gender clinic in London, is being sued over concerns it gave powerful drugs to children as young as 12 without proper consent. 

Keira Bell, 23, started gender reassignment at the clinic when she was just 16 after she felt suicidal and asked to be called by a boy's name at school. 

Ms Bell has now stopped transitioning and argues staff did not challenge her views to become a teenage boy.  

Keira Bell, 23, (pictured outside the Royal Courts of Justice in January) started gender reassignment at the clinic when she was just 16 after she felt suicidal and asked to be called by a boy's name at school

Keira Bell, 23, (pictured outside the Royal Courts of Justice in January) started gender reassignment at the clinic when she was just 16 after she felt suicidal and asked to be called by a boy's name at school

She was prescribed hormone blockers to halt the development of her female body after just three one-hour appointments. 

But Ms Bell is now waiting to see if she has fertility issues following the drugs and claims she should not have been rushed into treatment because children cannot given adequate consent.

The judge in the landmark case, Mr Justice Supperstone, said it was 'plainly arguable' the clinic was acting unlawfully and has given permission for the high-profile trial in the divisional by July. 

Ms Bell hopes the case will bring attention to the fact children are given treatment without being properly informed of the lifelong consequences.

Ms Bell (pictured in January) is now waiting to see if she has fertility issues following the drugs and claims she should not have been rushed into treatment

Ms Bell (pictured in January) is now waiting to see if she has fertility issues following the drugs and claims she should not have been rushed into treatment

'I am constantly taken for a boy,' she said in an interview with the Daily Mail. 'I get called 'Sir' when I speak to officials. I worry what women think when they see me using their loos or changing rooms. 

'I am living in a world where I do not fit in as a male or as a female. I am stuck between the two sexes.' 

Put on what she calls a 'roller coaster' journey, she was soon being given the male hormone testosterone to change her appearance. Three years ago, she had her removed, in an operation paid for by the NHS.

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