Villagers in Ethiopia are bleeding from their noses and mouths before dropping ...

Ethiopians are bleeding from their noses and mouths before dropping dead in a mystery sickness - which has been blamed on toxic waste from Chinese oil drilling.

The sickness, which has allegedly spread through villages near a gas project in Somali, is also reported to turn its victims' eyes yellow, before causing a fever, swelling across the body and ultimately death. 

Other symptoms of the unidentified illness include yellowing palms, a lack of appetite and sleeplessness.   

Officials in Addis Ababa have denied allegations of a health and environmental crisis in the region, the Guardian reported.

Villagers in Ethiopia are bleeding from their noses and mouths before dropping dead in a mystery sickness - which has been blamed on toxic waste from Chinese oil drilling (Pictured: an oil exploration project in Ethiopia)

Villagers in Ethiopia are bleeding from their noses and mouths before dropping dead in a mystery sickness - which has been blamed on toxic waste from Chinese oil drilling (Pictured: an oil exploration project in Ethiopia)

It is also unclear what is causing the sickness, though many are suspicious it is caused by apparent chemical waste which has poisoned the region's water supply.

'It is the toxins that flow in the rainfall from Calub [gas field] that are responsible for this epidemic,' victim Khadar Abdi Abdullahi said.

Mr Abdullahi, 23, from Jigjiga, was discharged from hospital when doctors told him there was nothing more they could do when he fell ill. He later died.

An adviser to the Somali regional government claimed there 'are new diseases that have never been seen before in this area.'

'Without any public health protection, it is very clear that POLY-GCL uses chemicals that are detrimental to human health,' they added.

China's POLY-GCL Petroleum Investments last year confirmed plans to build a 767-km Ethiopia to Djibouti natural gas pipeline to transport Ethiopian gas to an export terminal in the Red Sea state. 

Pictured: The Somali region in Ethiopia, where the mystery illness has allegedly been spreading

Pictured: The Somali region in Ethiopia, where the mystery illness has allegedly been spreading

The East African country found extensive gas deposits in its eastern Ogaden Basin in the 1970s.  

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