The coronavirus map of New York: City releases borough by borough breakdown of ...

Queens is emerging as the epicenter of the epicenter in New York City as the city reveals a borough by borough map which highlights the neighborhoods reporting the most positive cases. 

The death toll in the city rose to 450 as of early Saturday morning as its healthcare system is threatened with imminent collapse. 

On both Thursday and Friday, another 85 people died of the virus, or an average of one New Yorker every 17 minutes. There are 26,697 confirmed NYC cases as the national total soars over 100,000.

The shocking map released by the city shows that every single neighborhood has over 30 percent of patients testing positive for coronavirus, although none are returning higher than 65.41 percent positive results.  

Of the five boroughs, Queens is now the epicenter of New York City's outbreak, with 8,214 cases, a one-day increase of 32 percent. 

In just the past week, one funeral home in Queens has held service for close to a dozen people who have died from the virus, and is expecting to do more. 

Manhattan patients are testing positive at a significantly lower rate than the outer boroughs with no neighborhood reporting over 40 percent of patients confirmed positive.  

The map was compiled using data from the 51,404 people tested as of Thursday but with the dire situation in the city escalating quickly, some neighborhoods may now be even harder hit.   

This map released by the city shows the number of patients who are testing positive for coronavirus in each borough

This map released by the city shows the number of patients who are testing positive for coronavirus in each borough

Mayor Bill de Blasio said that he believes the city's strained healthcare system has supplies to make it through next week

Mayor Bill de Blasio said that he believes the city's strained healthcare system has supplies to make it through next week

The city's map shows that half of the neighborhoods in Queens are reporting over 51 percent of coronavirus tests come back positive with West Queens, Fresh Meadows, Jamaica, Southeast Queens and Rockaway all in the red. 

Only one Queens neighborhood, Bayside-Little Neck, is below 40 percent.   

Brooklyn, the most populous borough, has 6,750 cases, up 26 percent from Thursday, and also has half of its neighborhoods highlighted in red with positive cases returned to over 50 percent of patients. 

Greenpoint, Williamsburg, Bedstuy, Borough Park and East Flatbush-Flatbush are all listed in red with only Bensonhurst-Bayridge reporting under 40 percent positive cases.  

The Bronx has 4,655 cases and Manhattan has 4,478 cases, both increases of 18 percent. Staten Island was up 6 percent, at 1,440 cases.  

The Bronx was the only other borough to list a red-level neighborhood with High Bridge-Morrisania returning positive results to over 50 percent of its patients.  

An NYPD traffic officer wearing personal protective equipment stands at a barricade after the city closed down a section of Bushwick Avenue after Brooklyn had the second highest cases in New York City

An NYPD traffic officer wearing personal protective equipment stands at a barricade after the city closed down a section of Bushwick Avenue after Brooklyn had the second highest cases in New York City

A Hasidic Jewish community modifies Shabbat (sabbath) services after their synagogue is closed in response to the coronavirus pandemic in Williamsburg where over 50 percent of patients are testing positive

A Hasidic Jewish community modifies Shabbat (sabbath) services after their synagogue is closed in response to the coronavirus pandemic in Williamsburg where over 50 percent of patients are testing positive

Mainly empty shelves in the cold/flu section, amid fears of the global growth of coronavirus cases, are seen in a Rite Aid store in Greenpoint, one of the red zones in a map breaking down coronavirus cases by neighborhood in NYC

Mainly empty shelves in the cold/flu section, amid fears of the global growth of coronavirus cases, are seen in a Rite Aid store in Greenpoint, one of the red zones in a map breaking down coronavirus cases by neighborhood in NYC

People wearing surgical masks shop in Brooklyn's Bedford Stuyvesant neighborhood, which is a red zone for positive cases

People wearing surgical masks shop in Brooklyn's Bedford Stuyvesant neighborhood, which is a red zone for positive cases

Most other Bronx neighborhoods, such as Northeast Bronx, Fordham-Bronx Park, Pelham-Throgs Neck, and Crotona-Tremont, are at just under 50 percent of positive cases.  

Ever neighborhood in Manhattan has over 30 percent positive cases in patients tested by Thursday but is seeing lower percentage rates than the outer boroughs. The majority of neighborhoods including the Upper East Side, Upper West Side and East Harlem are in the lower percentage band. 

Higher percentage of positive cases, between 40.85 percent and 46.34 percent are seen in Chelsea-Clinton, Washington Heights-Inwood and Central Harlem-Morningside Heights. 

 While Staten Island is the second least hit borough, most neighborhoods are still seeing over 40 percent of patients receive positive results. Port Richmond is the only neighborhood reporting less than 40 percent while Stapleton-St George, Willowbrook and South Beach-Tottenville are between 40 and 46 percent. 

A coronavirus patient is transferred from Elmhurst General Hospital in Queens to another hospital with more room as this hospital is overflowing with patients. City officials and healthcare workers say that the city is at a crisis point

A coronavirus patient is transferred from Elmhurst General Hospital in Queens to another hospital with more room as this hospital is overflowing with patients. City officials and healthcare workers say that the city is at a crisis point

EMTs load a patient into an ambulance as health workers continued to test people for coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outside the Brooklyn Hospital Center in Brooklyn on Friday

EMTs load a patient into an ambulance as health workers continued to test people for coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outside the Brooklyn Hospital Center in Brooklyn on Friday

Across the city, sirens wailed late into the night Friday as ambulance crews raced through empty streets from one call to the next. Medical emergency calls were up 40 percent to about 6,500 a day, shattering historical records and leading to up to 170 callers being put on hold at a time, according to EMS union officials.

FDNY officials are strongly urging New Yorkers to call 911 only if they are having urgent emergencies, such as heart troubles or problems breathing. 'Please allow first responders to assist those most in need. Only call 911 if you need help right away,' the department said in a statement.

Inside the city's hospitals, stretched to their limits by the crisis, healthcare workers faced unspeakable scenes of suffering and death.

'Hell. Biblical. I kid you not. People come in, they get intubated, they die, the cycle repeats,' said Dr Steve Kassapidis of Mount Sinai Queens, in an interview with Sky News. '9/11 was nothing compared to this, we were open waiting for patients to come who never came. Now they just keep coming.'  

'The hospitals look like a war zone,' Dr Emad Youssef of Brookdale Hospital in Brooklyn told CBS News. 'People lining up out of the hallway, through the EMS bay, through the ambulance bay, with masks on themselves, with oxygen on their nose.'  

Doctors and nurses across the city report increasing shortages of vital personal protective equipment (PPE) such as masks and gowns -- though city and hospital officials are denying the problem. 

In contrast to the desperate conditions in hospitals, the streets were eerily empty. Landmarks including the Brooklyn Bridge and Times Square were deserted on Friday, a warm spring day that would normally see them teeming. 

At a press conference on Friday, Mayor Bill de Blasio said that he believes the city's strained healthcare system has the personnel and supplies to make it through next week, but beyond that is uncertain. 

'After next Sunday, April 5, is when I get very, very worried about everything we're gonna need,' he said, saying that an infusion of medical staff and equipment was needed to stave off disaster. 

'I've put down that marker to the White House, that that is a decisive moment for the city of New York,' he said, saying the city urgently needs additional federal and military support, as well as at least 15,000 ventilators.

'We need to make sure we can get to that day and face the week after that, and the week after that as well,' de Blasio said. 'Right now we're not there.'

'I think people need to be ready for battle, and the hard truth helps them gird themselves for what's ahead,' he continued.

Brooklyn Bridge is nearly empty of foot and auto traffic on Friday after the first week of mandatory social distancing

Brooklyn Bridge is nearly empty of foot and auto traffic on Friday after the first week of mandatory social distancing

FDR Drive in Manhattan is quiet during the evening rush hour, as cases of coronavirus continue to explode in the city

FDR Drive in Manhattan is quiet during the evening rush hour, as cases of coronavirus continue to explode in the city

The streets of the Lower East Side, Manhattan, are empty during the evening rush hour on Friday

The streets of the Lower East Side, Manhattan, are empty during the evening rush hour on Friday

Bus service continued to run at reduced capacity on Friday in Manhattan. On this bus, riders are told to enter in the rear doors and a chain prevents them from getting too close to the driver

Bus service continued to run at reduced capacity on Friday in Manhattan. On this bus, riders are told to enter in the rear doors and a chain prevents them from getting

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