Video calls, no hugs and no chocolates: How mother's day will change forever ...

Families are settling in for a very different type of Mother's Day next weekend as social distancing measures remain in place across the country.

Dining out, large public gatherings and hugs between family members are likely to disappear entirely for families who don't live together because of COVID-19.

The Public Health Association of Australia believes gift-giving like boxes of chocolates or flowers won't pose a health risk but people will become more creative when it comes to showing they care.

Victorian Premier Daniel Andrews has urged families to avoid face-to-face meetings and connect with their mothers or grandmothers via video chat or through the delivery of flowers or 'special goodies'.

Families are settling in for a very different type of Mother's Day next weekend as social distancing measures remain in place across the country (Pictured: a family smiles after leaving the Crown Promenade hotel in Melbourne after 14 days quarantine)

Families are settling in for a very different type of Mother's Day next weekend as social distancing measures remain in place across the country (Pictured: a family smiles after leaving the Crown Promenade hotel in Melbourne after 14 days quarantine)

Dining out, large public gatherings and hugs between family members are likely to disappear entirely for families who don't live together because of COVID-19 (PICTURED: A mother and daughter embrace after being released from 14 days isolation at  a Sydney hotel)

Dining out, large public gatherings and hugs between family members are likely to disappear entirely for families who don't live together because of COVID-19 (PICTURED: A mother and daughter embrace after being released from 14 days isolation at  a Sydney hotel)

PHA chief executive Terry Slevin told Daily Mail Australia people shouldn't expect to celebrate the way they have in previous years.

'For Mother's Day 2020 we won't all be going out to a local restaurant for a big lunch or big family gatherings in public spaces... but we'll be finding other ways of expressing that. I'm sure Zoom will go into meltdown,' Mr Slevin said. 

'In some cases it might mean people getting creative - sending video messages, making use of the technologies we have got and how we can express how we love each other. My son is writing a song and recording it on video and sending it to his mum,' Mr Slevin said. 

But he said some normalcy will remain.

'Delivering of flowers and a box of chocolates... That’s not going to hinder those options. If you’ve been sending your mum a bunch of flowers to your mum every Mother's Day for the last 30 years there is no reason not to this year,’ he said.

'The transport sector has been conscious about these issues and there has been heightened recognition of hygiene, hand washing and the like but caution at the receiving end is good as well. So, wiping down, boxes and packages, and treating them in a hygienic way.' 

Mr Slevin admitted it was impossible to see what celebrations for 2021 would look like, but agreed some of the ways people celebrate this year could become more commonplace. 

The Public Health Association of Australia believes gift-giving like boxes of chocolates or flowers won't pose a health risk but people will become more creative when it comes to showing they care (PICTURED: a woman receives flowers after being released from 14 day isolation in Sydney)

The Public Health Association of Australia believes gift-giving like boxes of chocolates or flowers won't pose a health risk but people will become more creative when it comes to showing they care (PICTURED: a woman receives flowers after being released from 14 day isolation in Sydney)

'Nobody has the perfect crystal ball and we're dealing with this one week at a time. There will be a new normal… there will be a variety of changes that will last well beyond 2020 when it comes to the impact of COVID-19 and we still haven't figured out what those things are,' he said.

'As we all get better at new technologies there is a greater capacity to stay in touch. We have all learned new tricks about how we communicate with each other and I'm quit sure that will be a feature of Mother's day well beyond COVID-19.' 

While restaurants and cafes have experienced a drop in demand, one sector appears to be experiencing a resurgence.

The flower industry was hit hard in the first week of the coronavirus restrictions when weddings and corporate functions had to be cancelled nationwide. 

Growers like Joe Oliveri from Oliveri Flowers on the New South Wales Central Coast told ABC news he was forced to dump $20,000 worth of flowers last month because no one was buying them. 

'For Mother's Day 2020 we won't all be going out to a local restaurant for a big lunch or big family gatherings in public spaces... but we'll be finding other ways of expressing that. I'm sure Zoom will go into meltdown,' Mr Slevin said

'For Mother's Day 2020 we won't all be going out to a local restaurant for a big lunch or big family gatherings in public spaces... but we'll be finding other ways of expressing that. I'm sure Zoom will go into meltdown,' Mr Slevin said

While Van Gogh Flowers at Hawthorn in Melbourne's Eastern suburbs saw an 80 per cent drop in sales in the first week because of COVID-19.

Director Tony Pavlou told Daily

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