Commuters told to check temperatures before leaving home individual towns ...

Commuters will be told to check their temperatures before travelling and individual towns and cities could be put on lockdown in an easing of restrictions to be set out by the Government next week. 

Boris Johnson will set out a 'roadmap' of how to take Britain out of full lockdown and start easing coronavirus restrictions when they are looked at again next Thursday. 

Workers could be forced to take their temperature before they leave home in a bid to stop crowded Tubes and trains becoming death traps, it was reported in The Times. 

The Prime Minister's blueprint could see offices, factories and a selection of shops given two weeks to impose new social distancing measures, with the Prime Minister aiming to get the UK back at work by May 26, according to The Sun. 

The two-metre rule could also be scrapped in some places, with scientists leaning towards the view that the virus does not carry that far in the air, reports The Telegraph.  

But a new YouGov poll has shown that 75 per cent of Britons support extending the lockdown next week, with ministers fearing 'coronaphobia' could prevent the economy from firing up again.   

A new YouGov poll of 3152 adults has revealed that 77 per cent would like to see the lockdown continue while just 15 per cent are opposed to the move. Some 46 per cent of those surveyed said they would 'strongly support' the decision to extend the lockdown while 31 per cent said they would 'somewhat support' an extension. Just 8 per cent said they did not know. 

When restrictions are eased experts will monitor how different parts of the country are complying and may put individual towns and cities back on lockdown if the re-infection rate, or R, creeps above 1 again.   

YouGov asked 3152 British adults: The next government lockdown review is on May 7th. Would you support or oppose extending the current lockdown beyond 7th May?

YouGov asked 3152 British adults: The next government lockdown review is on May 7th. Would you support or oppose extending the current lockdown beyond 7th May?

Ipsos MORI polling has suggested 61 per cent of Britons would be nervous about going out to bars and restaurants even if the draconian restrictions are loosened

Passengers on a Jubilee line train on the London Underground today

Passengers on a Jubilee line train on the London Underground today

An empty Tube station is pictured in west London today while ministers consider whether to tell people to check their temperatures before they travel

An empty Tube station is pictured in west London today while ministers consider whether to tell people to check their temperatures before they travel 

A-near empty Circle Line carriage is pictured travelling through west London today ahead of lockdown measures being re-visited

A-near empty Circle Line carriage is pictured travelling through west London today ahead of lockdown measures being re-visited

A senior Government source said: 'There is a desire to do this nationally, but once we start lifting restrictions we will want to be able to see if there is an outburst say in Leicester – all of a sudden loads of people getting coronavirus.

'To get that under control, if you have a flashpoint, you have got to put out the fire in a particular place. Instead of putting everyone in the country into lockdown again you would want to target [an area].' 

One Cabinet minister said: 'A lot of the focus now is about giving people the confidence to go back to work.' 

Department for Transport ministers are working with SAGE (Scientific Advisory Group for Emergencies) to avoid the return to work mirroring chaotic scenes on public transport Britain saw at the beginning of lockdown. 

No decisions have yet been taken, but with Britain losing £2billion from its GDP everyday the nation remains on shutdown, it could be on the cards when the situation is re-visited next week. 

Staff working every other week, wearing PPE in canteens, and face coverings on public transport are among other option being mooted to help reduce the risks. 

The UK population appears to be among the most anxious in the world about coronavirus, with more than a quarter saying lockdown should not be eased even if the PM's 'five tests' are met.

There are reports that some people who have returned to work have been getting abuse from neighbours who believe they are threatening their safety.

Ministers have admitted they must win over the public to a more 'nuanced' message, with advisers saying the stark 'stay at home' warning might have been too successful over the past six weeks. 

In another tumultuous day of coronavirus developments: 

The UK has today announced 739 more coronavirus deaths, taking Britain's official fatality toll to 27,180;  A top midwife has warned coronavirus could lead to a surge in baby deaths because women enduring a difficult pregnancy are afraid to go to hospitals;  Ministers are facing demands to push for South Korea-style contact tracing after Matt Hancock declared the 100,000 a day target for coronavirus tests has been met;  There are claims a deadline of the end of the month is being set for full contact tracing to be in place - but that is later than the mid-May timetable previously mooted;   Labour leader Sir Keir Starmer has accused Mr Johnson of being 'slow at every turn' in the response to the crisis and demanded an exit strategy from lockdown as soon as possible;  Experts said it was 'perfectly reasonable' for the UK to start easing lockdown before a contact tracing regime is fully in place';  Ryanair has announced 3,000 job cuts as it revealed it expects to operate under 1 per cent of its schedule between April and June;  Heathrow chief executive John Holland-Kaye has warned that social distancing at airports is 'physically impossible';  The ONS has published local breakdowns of coronavirus-related deaths suggesting deprived areas with high BAME populations are most at risk.

Commuters on the Tube this morning are still unable to stay two metres apart, even though services are less busy than before the coronavirus lockdown

Commuters on the

this morning are still unable to stay two metres apart, even though services are less busy than before the coronavirus lockdown 

Levels of transport activity among the public have plunged since lockdown - although there has been a slight uptick over recent days 

The virus cannot survive if the reproduction rate - known as the R number - remains below one. Some countries that have lifted their locdowns are seeing the R number increas.  Restrictions in Germany were relaxed after the infection rate fell under 1.0 - meaning each person is infecting less than one other - as opposed to each infecting up five or six people. The R rate is now rising slightly again

The virus cannot survive if the reproduction rate - known as the R number - remains below one. Some countries that have lifted their locdowns are seeing the R number increas.  Restrictions in Germany were relaxed after the infection rate fell under 1.0 - meaning each person is infecting less than one other - as opposed to each infecting up five or six people. The R rate is now rising slightly again 

The rate of coronavirus infection in Denmark has increased since schools and kindergartens were re-opened, new figures have revealed. Analysis by Denmark's infectious diseases agency the State Serum Institute (SSI) found the reproduction rate, known as 'R', rose since schools opened on April 15 as the virus lockdown was eased. According to the data, the 'R rate' increased from 0.6 in mid-April to 0.9 as of yesterday.

The rate of coronavirus infection in Denmark has increased since schools and kindergartens were re-opened, new figures have revealed. Analysis by Denmark's infectious diseases agency the State Serum Institute (SSI) found the reproduction rate, known as 'R', rose since schools opened on April 15 as the virus lockdown was eased. According to the data, the 'R rate' increased from 0.6 in mid-April to 0.9 as of yesterday.

In a round of interviews today, Housing Secretary Robert Jenrick admitted that getting UK plc back on its feet would require the public accepting a more 'nuanced' message

In a round of interviews today, Housing Secretary Robert Jenrick admitted that getting UK plc back on its feet would require the public accepting a more 'nuanced' message

A separate YouGov poll also revealed today that Britons are no longer planning to holiday following the coronavirus lockdown. Some 36 per cent said they were planning a trip but are no longer doing so.

Separate polling has also suggested 61 per cent of Britons would be nervous about going out to bars and restaurants even if the draconian restrictions are loosened. 

Statistician Professor Sir David Spiegelhalter, a government adviser, said today that the 'social distancing' communications strategy had worked too well.

Now control the outbreak like South Korea! Ex-health secretary Jeremy Hunt hails ramp-up in UK testing as ministers voice 'confidence' 100,000-a-day target has been hit 

Ministers were urged to get a South Korea-style grip on the coronavirus outbreak today after it emerged the 100,000 a day target for tests is on the verge of being met.

Government sources believe the goal set by Matt Hancock will be achieved when the figures are officially announced this afternoon following a last-minute surge - although they stressed it could not be 'taken for granted'. 

Health Select Committee chair Jeremy Hunt, one of the foremost critics of the testing regime, said Mr Hancock deserved credit for the 'enormous achievement'.

However, Mr Hunt, a former health secretary himself, insisted it is now crucial to use the capacity to introduce South Korea-style mass screening. 

He said that would enable the lockdown to be 'targeted' on those who are infected rather than crippling the whole UK economy. 

The government is setting another target for having full-scale contact tracing in place by the end of the month - although previously ministers had indicated the hoped it would up and running by mid-May.

Labour leader Keir Starmer has added to the pressure by demanding a timetable for reaching Boris Johnson's ambition of 250,000 tests a day, saying the UK also needs 50,000 contact tracers. 

'It's much harder to frighten to people to stay at home than it is to reassure them they can go out again,' he told BBC Radio 4's Today programme.

'Maybe our whole campaign has been, if anything, slightly too successful.' 

Housing Secretary Robert Jenrick admitted that getting UK plc back on its feet would require the public accepting a more 'nuanced' message.

He said that sectors such as housing and construction 'on the whole' could go back to work now as the majority was done outside and could be carried out in accordance with social distancing.

'I think we are, at the moment, where the country can take a message that is slightly nuanced and saying 'this is what you need to do today, but this is what the future looks like so that you and your family can start to prepare'.'

In response to Mr Johnson's optimism that the UK economy would 'bounce back' following the pandemic, Mr Jenrick said he too was confident.

'The fundamentals of the British economy remain sound,' he said. 

When the lockdown is lifted will depend on the reproduction number of the virus - known as the R value - which will then influence when lockdown measures can begin to lift.

Prime Minister Boris Johnson yesterday confirmed that the R is now lower than 1, meaning the virus is spreading slower than one-to-one and the outbreak is on course to come to a natural end.

At the start of the outbreak in the UK the R rate had been between 2.4 and 4, scientists say, but the dramatic stay-at-home measures that came into place on March 23 have cut it by at least two thirds.

The virus cannot survive if the R remains below one, and the Government must now scale up its testing and surveillance to make sure it is never allowed to rise above that number again.

However countries that have lifted their lockdowns including Germany and Denmark have started to see their R number rise again   

Welsh First Minister Mark Drakeford said the government will need to 'take people with us'.

'As we move to open up things again, we will be careful and cautious, we will have to take people with us,' he said.

'Our efforts over the last week have been directed at working with our trade unions, our local authorities and other stakeholders because you can open up anything you like, but if people don't think it's safe to take up what is now available to them, they won't come.'

Labour leader Sir Keir Starmer accused Mr Johnson of being 'slow, slow at every

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