What trade-offs are likely to be needed to keep the virus under control?

At a gloomy Downing Street press conference yesterday, Boris Johnson was unable to deliver to usual good news of a slight relaxation of lockdown rules, moving the country a step back to normality.

After seeing spikes in infection rates across the country, and having to reimpose some measures on Greater Manchester and parts of Lancashire and West Yorkshire, the Prime Minister conceded any further easing would face a delay of at least two weeks.

The government's chief medical officer, Chris Whitty, went a step further by warning: 'We have probably reached near the limit or the limits of what we can do in terms of opening up society.'

He instead explained that the Government and the public would have to decide on some 'difficult trade-offs' to keep the virus under control and still be able to do things like reopen schools.

So, what are these future trade-offs likely to be?

Face masks: Tightened

Already mandatory on public transport and in retail stores, the rules on wearing a face covering is to be expanded to almost all indoor public spaces.

Wearing one will become mandatory in cinemas, museums and places of worship from August 8, on top of supermarkets, banks, takeaway outlets, and post offices where it is already being enforced.

Offices, which are deemed private indoor spaces, will be exempt along with bars and restaurants. 

Boris Johnson yesterday promised that the police will be would be playing a much bigger role in enforcing the rules on face masks, as well as breaking up large gatherings.

But both the Police Federation, which represents rank-and-file officers, and the National Association of Police Chiefs said they expected shop owners and local councils to enforce the rules in the first instance  

Those who flout the rule face a fine of up to £100.

Already mandatory on public transport and in retail stores, the rules on wearing a face covering is to be expanded to almost all indoor public spaces

Already mandatory on public transport and in retail stores, the rules on wearing a face covering is to be expanded to almost all indoor public spaces

Weddings: Cancelled

receptions of up to 30 people – which could have been held from today – cannot take place. Ceremonies can go ahead, with restrictions, but there will be no party afterwards.

Any celebration after the ceremony must be limited to six people outdoors or the members of two households indoors.

Mr Johnson apologised but added: 'We simply cannot take the risk.'

Chris Whitty, the chief medical officer for England, said the infection data suggests 'we have probably reached near the limit of what we can do in terms of opening up society'.

Graham Podesta said his daughter Jamie, whose is today, was in floods of tears following the announcement. 'We have to tell people who are travelling not to travel, people who have booked into Travelodge, not to do that, it's just a whole nightmare,' he said. 

services: Postponed

Close-contact services, such as facials, make-up application, eyebrow shaping and eyelash treatments, have been banned for another two weeks. 

Hair dressers are allowed to remain open. 

salons were allowed to open on July 13 but only for treatments away from the face, such as manicures and body massages.

Close-contact beauty services, such as facials, make-up application, eyebrow shaping and eyelash treatments, have been banned for another two weeks

Close-contact services, such as facials, make-up application, eyebrow shaping and eyelash treatments, have been banned for another two weeks

Casinos and bowling alleys: Postponed

Casinos and bowling alleys, which were due to open their doors for the first time in months tomorrow have been told to remain closed.

It is feared that playing items such as poker chips and bowling balls would be difficult to clean thoroughly and regularly enough.

However, Boris Johnson urged workers to return to work as planned from next week. 

Return to offices: Yes

Mr Johnson has in recent weeks moved away from the Government's work from home advice, encouraging people to return to the office where possible.

From today people will no longer be told to work from home where possible, and are instead being advised to take a decision jointly with their employers.

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