Muslims sacrifice animals to celebrate Eid al-Adha during scaled back ...

Muslims around the world continue to celebrate Eid al-Adha as they slaughter livestock amid scaled back festivities because of the coronavirus pandemic. 

Today marks the second of the four-day Feast of the Sacrifice, which coincides with the last days of the Hajj in Saudi Arabia.

Eid al-Adha commemorates Muslims' belief that prophet Abraham was willing to sacrifice his son as an act of obedience to God, before God replaced his son with a ram to be sacrificed instead.

Many Muslims who can afford it sacrifice cattle as part of the celebrations, as well as camels, goats, sheep or rams.

Muslim devotees slaughter cattle during the Eid al-Adha, the feast of sacrifice, in Lahore

Muslim devotees slaughter cattle during the Eid al-Adha, the feast of sacrifice, in Lahore

Muslims attend prayers at a mosque in Peshawar in Pakistan. Eid al-Adha is the holiest of the two Muslims holidays celebrated each year and it marks the yearly Muslim pilgrimage Hajj to visit Mecca

Muslims attend prayers at a mosque in Peshawar in Pakistan. Eid al-Adha is the holiest of the two Muslims holidays celebrated each year and it marks the yearly Muslim pilgrimage Hajj to visit Mecca

People struggle to control a bull for slaughtering for Eid al-Adha in Karachi, Pakistan

People struggle to control a bull for slaughtering for Eid al-Adha in Karachi, Pakistan

Muslims wearing face masks prepare to slaughter a cow during an Eid al-Adha festival in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia

Muslims wearing face masks prepare to slaughter a cow during an Eid al-Adha festival in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia

The meat is distributed to the poor to commemorate the prophet Abraham's willingness to sacrifice his son, but the economic crisis means that many cannot afford livestock. 

Rule of the sacrifice include that the animal can only be slaughtered after the Eid prayer, and that is has to be an adult at the time it is slaughtered. 

Water should also be offered to the animal before the time of the slaughter, and every animal that is sacrificed must be completely healthy without any physical defects. 

The coronavirus has cast a shadow over this Eid, with fears of another spike in infections prompting authorities to warn people to minimise movement, avoid cattle markets and refrain from public gatherings to witness the slaughter of sacrificial animals.

Eid al-Fitr, marked in May, was followed by a spike in Covid-19 infections with new daily cases.   

A man checks a cow's head after slaughtering it during the sacrificial Eid al-Adha festival in Banda Aceh

A man checks a cow's head after slaughtering it during the sacrificial Eid al-Adha festival in Banda Aceh

Men gather to slaughter a camel in celebration of Eid al-Adha in Peshawar in Pakistan

Men gather to slaughter a camel in celebration of Eid al-Adha in Peshawar in Pakistan

Mosques have imposed strict hygiene rules to prevent the virus from spreading at Eid prayers, while families in many countries are unable to gather as they normally would. 

Kosovo and the United Arab Emirates have also closed mosques to limit the spread of the virus.

In Lebanon, Muslim worshippers prayed in mosques under tight

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