Fears millions of new homes will be rushed through in Government's major ...

Mass developments could be rushed through without full consultation from locals under the government's radical overhaul of the current planning system, experts fear.

Boris Johnson is planning to revolutionise the process as part of a 'once-in-a-generation' reform that will divide the country into three types of land: areas earmarked for 'growth', those for 'renewal' and others for 'protection'.  

'Growth' areas will see new homes, hospitals, schools, shops and offices given automatic approval for development. 

But experts fear the reforms could 'sideline public consultation' or put developers off all together as they try to understand the new, complex rules. 

Housing Secretary Robert Jenrick said the current 'complex and slow' system used by developers and homeowners to seek permission to build 'has been a barrier to building homes which are affordable, where families want to raise children and build their lives'. 

But the CPRE, the countryside charity, has warned the Government's planning reforms seem like a 'gross oversimplification of the planning system.' 

Housing Secretary Robert Jenrick said the current 'complex and slow' planning system used by developers and homeowners to seek permission to build 'has been a barrier to building homes which are affordable, where families want to raise children and build their lives'

Housing Secretary Robert Jenrick said the current 'complex and slow' planning system used by developers and homeowners to seek permission to build 'has been a barrier to building homes which are affordable, where families want to raise children and build their lives' 

Local Government Association chairman James Jamieson told The Mirror: 'It is vital that any reforms provide the right protections so residents have the power to shape the area they live in.'

He said upwards of one million properties have not been built yet - even though they have been granted planning permission within the last ten years.

Approval is given to around 90 per cent of properties, he added, suggesting that planning applications are not holding developers back.

District Councils' Network's Mark Crane said: 'We cannot compromise on the quality of new homes and places and sideline public consultation, which we fear will be the consequence of the reforms.' 

Boris Johnson is planning to revolutionise the process as part of a 'once-in-a-generation' reform that will divide the country into three types of land: areas earmarked for 'growth', those for 'renewal' and others for 'protection'

Boris Johnson is planning to revolutionise the process as part of a 'once-in-a-generation' reform that will divide the country into three types of land: areas earmarked for 'growth', those for 'renewal' and others for 'protection'

Shelter chief executive Polly Neate said: 'Housebuilders risk facing uncertainty as they scramble to understand the new system and what it means for their plans - just as the construction industry is facing a huge economic downturn.'

Tom Fyans, director of campaigns and policy at CPRE, the countryside charity, added the reforms 'sound like a gross oversimplification of the planning system.'

He said: 'First and foremost, our planning process must respond to the needs of communities, both in terms of providing much-needed affordable homes and other vital infrastructure, and green spaces for our health and wellbeing. 

‘The planning process as it stands may not be perfect but instead of deregulating planning, the government must invest in planning. Quality development needs a quality planning system with community participation at its heart.

‘The Secretary of State has

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