University lecturer turned his camera to the night sky to take stunning images ...

An amateur astrophotographer and university lecturer has revealed the stunning pictures of space he took during lockdown - from his back garden.

Russell Discombe, 32, has always loved taking photos of the cosmos but was able to devote himself to it during lockdown. The enthusiast turned his attention to the sky - and said he is over the moon with the results.

Russell, from Cirencester, Gloucestershire, bought a star tracker and telescope to locate the 'deep sky' objects - some up to 50 million light-years away.

He then used a special astrophotography camera to capture anything he spotted - producing some incredible images.

Pictured: The Elephant's Trunk Nebula, taken by Russell Discombe from his back garden during lockdown. The Elephant's Trunk Nebula, named for its shape, is located in the constellation Cepheus, roughly 2,400 light years away from Earth. It is thought to be a site of star formation, containing very young stars that are less than 100,000 years old, while two older stars of a couple of million years are believed to be in the circular cavity at the top of the image

Pictured: The Elephant's Trunk Nebula, taken by Russell Discombe from his back garden during lockdown. The Elephant's Trunk Nebula, named for its shape, is located in the constellation Cepheus, roughly 2,400 light years away from Earth. It is thought to be a site of star formation, containing very young stars that are less than 100,000 years old, while two older stars of a couple of million years are believed to be in the circular cavity at the top of the image 

Pictured: The Heart Nebula, around 7,500 light years away from earth, is located in the Perseus Arm of the Galaxy in the constellation Cassiopeia. Its colour - often seen as deep red - is caused by the radiation emanating from a small group of stars near the centre of the nebula

Pictured: The Heart Nebula, around 7,500 light years away from earth, is located in the Perseus Arm of the Galaxy in the constellation Cassiopeia. Its colour - often seen as deep red - is caused by the radiation emanating from a small group of stars near the centre of the nebula

Pictured: Bode's galaxy, or Messier 81, is a 'grand design spiral galaxy' that is about 12 million light years away from Earth, with a diameter or 90,000 light years - about half the size of the milky way. It has been studied  extensively by astronomers, having first been discovered in 1774 Johann Elert Bode, giving it its nickname

Pictured: Bode's galaxy, or Messier 81, is a 'grand design spiral galaxy' that is about 12 million light years away from Earth, with a diameter or 90,000 light years - about half the size of the milky way. It has been studied  extensively by astronomers, having first been discovered in 1774 Johann Elert Bode, giving it its nickname

Pictured: Russell Discombe and his telescope at his home in Cirencester, Gloucestershire, from where he has been taking photographs of 'deep sky' objects - some up to 50 million light-years away. He then used a special astrophotography camera to capture anything he spotted

Pictured: Russell Discombe and his telescope at his home in Cirencester, Gloucestershire, from where he has been taking photographs of 'deep sky' objects - some up to 50 million light-years away. He then used a special astrophotography camera to capture anything he spotted

Russell said: 'I have always loved astrophotography, however, the majority of my images have been wide angle landscapes of the Milky Way.

'Just before the lockdown, I had purchased my first star tracker and the lockdown gave me

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