UK records just three daily Covid deaths in lowest preliminary Sunday total ...

A further three people have died after testing positive for coroanvirus in Britain, preliminary figures show.

This figure brings the UK's total death toll during the pandemic to 41,552. 

The number is set to be much higher when the all settings figures - which include deaths in care homes and the wider community - are released later today. 

Three people have died in hospital in England. Both Scotland and Wales have reported no new deaths. 

Some 208 people have tested positive for coronavirus in Scotland alone while Wales has reported 98 new cases.  

England has not released its case figures yet. 

A further three people have died after testing positive for coroanvirus in Britain, preliminary figures show

It comes as experts believe coronavirus spreading in lower doses is keeping death tolls and hospital admissions low but daily case totals high.

Social distancing measures mean an infected person would only be able to pass on traces of Covid-19 to another person, therefore the virus's 'infectious dose' is lower.

Because the newly-infected person would have a smaller amount of the virus, their symptoms would not be as serious - in a similar manner to chicken pox.

While this would explain why a rise in cases has not lead to a rise in deaths, doctors have stressed that not enough is known about Covid-19 to determine whether it is dose-dependent. 

But other viruses, including SARS and MERS - the coronaviruses behind two previous pandemic outbreaks - follow this pattern. 

Cases of Covid-19 have been slowly creeping up in the UK since early July.

Greater Manchester as a whole saw 220 confirmed cases on Tuesday followed by 262 on Wednesday. Thursday saw a drop to 67

Greater Manchester as a whole saw 220 confirmed cases on Tuesday followed by 262 on Wednesday. Thursday saw a drop to 67

London saw 228 cases on August 27, followed by 214 on August 28 and 130 on August 29

London saw 228 cases on August 27, followed by 214 on August 28 and 130 on August 29

Experts believe coronavirus spreading in lower doses means death tolls and hospital admissions remain low, while daily case totals are high. Pictured: Daily coronavirus cases in Cardiff

Experts believe coronavirus spreading in lower doses means death tolls and hospital admissions remain low, while daily case totals are high. Pictured: Daily coronavirus cases in Cardiff

Social distancing measures mean an infected person would only be able to pass on traces of Covid-19 to another person meaning the virus's 'infectious dose' is lower. Pictured: Daily coronavirus cases in Swansea

Social distancing measures mean an infected person would only be able to pass on traces of Covid-19 to another person meaning the virus's 'infectious dose' is lower. Pictured: Daily coronavirus cases in Swansea

Government risks jeopardising the test and trace system by urging workers to return to the office at the same time as reopening schools, expert warns

Urging workers to return to the office at the same time as reopening schools is jeopardising the test and trace system's ability to cope, a leading public health expert has warned.

Professor Devi Sridhar, from the University of Edinburgh, said she was concerned about the UK Government's campaign to encourage people back into offices coinciding with pupils' return because the testing system in Scotland struggled with a surge of demand when schools reopened.

Ms Sridhar, who is an adviser to the Scottish Government, told Sky News that a fast, effective test and trace system was key to keeping the infection rate low and suppression of the virus was vital to enable economic recovery.

'I'm a little bit worried about the back to office push alongside the back to school push,' she said.

'What we've seen in Scotland over the past few weeks is the testing system has just been really having to race to catch up with the demand of all the children coming home with coughs and colds and fevers.

'If you add on top of that all the adults going back into offices and having those as well your testing system is really under strain. So you have to get ready and get your testing system going so people get the results fast enough and the tracing teams can get going.'

Asked about coronavirus infection among young people in schools, and whether schools returning could trigger a spike in cases, Ms Sridhar said: 'It's really in our hands.

'We've seen variable experience in the world, from Denmark, which handled school returning exceptionally well, has kids back with very little bump in terms of their [infection] numbers, compared to Israel where numbers just skyrocketed because the testing and tracing was in place.'

Mr Sridhar explained that all children were susceptible to contracting the same amount of the virus as adults, but younger children appeared to transmit the virus less than older ones.

The height of children could be one possible reason for the difference, she suggested.

'Some of the hypotheses are about the social interactions of primary school kids, who they're around, they're more likely to be asymptomatic, which means coughing and sneezing is less likely so they're not infecting others,' she said.

'As well as that, primary school kids are shorter and so they're less likely to be exposing adults or others around them.

'So, there is a difference, but science has not confirmed yet which of those hypotheses it could be.'

Ms Sridhar said she thought that another nationwide lockdown was 'unlikely' and added: 'When testing and tracing starts to break down, that's when you need your local restrictions, where you have restrictions on going to other people's homes or on pubs and hospitality or on riskier settings.

Although Ms Sridhar praised the UK Government for 'moving towards a model of maximum suppression', she said that they should consider introducing testing at airports when people arrive and then another test between five and eight days later.

She said: 'I think that UK Government, as a whole, have been behind the curve in terms of border control - one of the latest to put in border restrictions.

'When they have been put in place they are not really being monitored in terms of compliance with them, also it's also been quite a harsh measure for the aviation industry and creating uncertainty, so I think, yes, we definitely need a better approach.'

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This may seem alarming, but it has not corresponded with an increase in the number of people dying from the virus. 

In the first week of July, the number of new Covid-19 infections hit a low of roughly 550-a-day across the UK.

At that point there were about 150 people hospitalised with the virus every day in England alone and about 30 deaths.

Since then, the number of new infections has steadily risen. Last week, saw about 1,500 positive test results a day.

But the number of patients ending up in hospital and dying have continued to fall.

In the week ending September 4, there were a total of 51 UK deaths. 

In England, there are about 450 patients in hospital with Covid-19 – well below the 17,000 that were during the pandemic's peak in April.

Even in the Midlands, where there was a significant wave of cases throughout July and a return to lockdown in Leicester, the number of people in hospital or on ventilation has continued to fall.

There are now roughly seven patients in hospital in the Midlands NHS area on ventilators, from a peak of 485.  

Bolton was last night placed under tighter Covid-19 restrictions as the infection rate in the area became the highest in England.

Bolton Council has asked for people in the town to avoid mixing with other households and to only use public transport for essential purposes.

The town's infection rate recently increased to 99 cases per 100,000 people per week, the highest in England, the council said.  

Greater Manchester as a whole saw 220 confirmed cases on Tuesday followed by 262 on Wednesday. Thursday saw a drop to 67.

Meanwhile, Leeds is teetering on the brink and has been added to Public Health England's list of areas of concern - while measures will be eased in swathes of Greater Manchester, Lancashire and Leicester next week.

The Yorkshire city, home to half a million people, has seen its infection rate rise to 32.4 new cases per 100,000 people, bringing it to the attention of authorities.

London saw 228 cases on August 27, followed by 214 on August 28 and 130 on August 29.

Bristol saw five cases on August 30, which climbed to eight on August 31 and 12 on September 1.

The Cardiff and Vale University Health Board saw a spike of 18 cases in one day on August 29. 

Dr Elisabetta Groppelli, a virologist at St George's University of London, said: 'If you are exposed to a smaller amount of virus, fewer cells in your body get infected, so there's time for your immune system to mount a response.

'If

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