Wildfires sweeping California have caused the skies over Britain to change ...

Orange skies seen across Britain on Friday were caused by wildfires currently burning 5,000 miles away on the West Coast of America.

Britons awoke to unusually orange skies on Friday, which meteorologists have confirmed were a result of the wildfires that have ripped across California, Oregon and Washington states.

The fires - which have burned through 470,000 acres of dry vegetation - have created large dust plumes, that have now travelled across the North Atlantic ocean.

'Noticed a bit of a orange glow this morning?' weather forecasters MetDesk tweeted on Friday.

'There is some evidence on trajectory models from NOAA [National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration] for traces of smoke originating from the U.S wildfires causing more of an orange tint to the cirrus clouds here in the UK this morning.'

Senior scientist at Copernicus Atmosphere Monitoring Service Mark Parrington said that the aerosol forecasts showed 'California fires smoke over Ireland before crossing the UK and North Sea throughout Friday'.

Later on Friday, he added that there was more crossing the Atlantic at 12 UTC.

An orange sky is seen in Lyme Regis, Dorset, on Friday. Meteorologists have confirmed that the colour was due to the wildfires currently raging on the West Coast of the US, 5,000 miles away

An orange sky is seen in Lyme Regis, Dorset, on Friday. Meteorologists have confirmed that the colour was due to the wildfires currently raging on the West Coast of the US, 5,000 miles away

MetDesk tweeted to confirm the cause of the orange skies, showing a map of the trajectory of the smoke from the fires going across the Atlantic Ocean

MetDesk tweeted to confirm the cause of the orange skies, showing a map of the trajectory of the smoke from the fires going across the Atlantic Ocean

Hugo Ricketts, an atmospheric physicist, tweeted: 'There was definitely a slight red tint to the sun over Manchester,' while meteorologist Paul Knightley said that at midday there was 'still a rather hazy look to the sky'. 

One Twitter user noted that he thought he even smelt 'burning pine' on his way to work in the morning, but Simon Lee, a meteorologist at the University of Reading, said this was unlikely, according to The Telegraph. 

'Meteorologically speaking, in the last few days we have seen a very strong and straight, west-east, jet stream, flowing across the North Atlantic from North America to Europe, which has undoubtedly helped rapidly and coherently transport the aerosols from North America.'

He added it was 'not too unusual for large dust plumes to travel huge distances – for example, Saharan dust often arrives at the US southeast'.

A person walks towards the setting sun, at low tide on a beautiful end to the day at Heacham, Norfolk on Friday. The fires - which have burned through 470,000 acres of dry vegetation - have created large dust plumes, which have now travelled across the North Atlantic ocean

A person walks towards the setting sun, at low tide on a beautiful end to the day at Heacham, Norfolk on Friday. The fires - which have

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