Hope for nut allergy sufferers as British boy, 12, can now EAT seven after ...

An NHS allergy trial has been so successful a British boy, 12, who had to completely avoid traces of peanuts or die can now eat seven - offering hope the treatment will be available for other sufferers within two years.

James Redman, from Heathfield in East Sussex, was diagnosed with a severe peanut allergy at the age of three - when he ate half a teaspoon of a sauce containing three per cent of the ingredient.

He was rushed to hospital in anaphylactic shock and doctors told his mother Zoe her then-toddler would have to completely avoid peanuts or risk dying the next time he came into contact with them.

Three years ago Mrs Redman managed to get her son onto the ARTEMIS trial - one of the largest peanut allergy trials ever conducted.

Since then he has managed to try a peanut M&M for the first time and drastically built up his tolerance.

James Redman (pictured, right, with his mother Zoe and three brothers), from Heathfield in East Sussex, was diagnosed with a severe peanut allergy at the age of three - when he ate half a teaspoon of a sauce containing three per cent of the ingredient

James Redman (pictured, right, with his mother Zoe and three brothers), from Heathfield in East Sussex, was diagnosed with a severe peanut allergy at the age of three - when he ate half a teaspoon of a sauce containing three per cent of the ingredient

Three years ago Mrs Redman managed to get her son onto the ARTEMIS trial - one of the largest peanut allergy trials ever conducted

Since then he has managed to try a peanut M&M for the first time and drastically built up his tolerance

Three years ago Mrs Redman managed to get her son onto the ARTEMIS trial - one of the largest peanut allergy trials ever conducted. Since then he has managed to try a peanut M&M for the first time and drastically built up his tolerance

The trial involved being given increasing amounts of peanut protein, for two and half years. 

Mrs Redman told MailOnline: 'The day we got the phone call to be on the trial we felt like we'd won the lottery. 

'There is no other alternative. There's no cure and this is the best chance we've got. 

'In January we will have been in trial for three years. We are building up evidence to prove it's save and hoping it'll be available to others in two years' time.'

By the end of the trial James was able to tolerate the equivalent of seven peanuts, meaning he is less likely to suffer a severe reaction in the future.

But Mrs Redman said she would still be keeping her son away from them.

By the end of the trial James was able to tolerate the equivalent of seven peanuts, meaning he is less likely to suffer a severe reaction in the future

By the end of the trial James was able to tolerate the equivalent of seven peanuts, meaning he is less likely to suffer a severe reaction in the future

'I'm still always on guard. He carries two EpiPens wherever he goes. His school also have two pens. We still check every label,' she said.

'It just gives us more peace of mind should he react. We may not even need his EpiPen.

'He's been desensitised so his body has become accustomed to it, but he'd still have to avoid peanuts at all costs because there's the underlying risk. 

'If he had accidental exposure the chances are he wouldn't have such a severe reaction.'

Peanut allergy, a potentially life-threatening condition, has doubled over the last two decades and affects about 1 in 50 children in the UK.

The allergy is rarely outgrown and is the most common cause of food allergy deaths.

Peanut allergy, a potentially life-threatening condition, has doubled over the last two decades and affects about 1 in 50 children in the UK. Pictured, James

Peanut allergy, a potentially life-threatening condition, has doubled over the last two decades and affects about 1 in 50 children in the UK. Pictured, James

The ARTEMIS study recruited nearly 200 children and young people aged four to 17 from across Europe. Evelina London Children's Hospital recruited the most patients to the study.

Mrs Redman had to made the four-hour round trip to the London hospital from their Sussex home every fortnight. 

Participants either received peanut allergen protein (AR101) or a placebo powder and doses were gradually increased every two weeks for a year.

The results, which were recently published in the journal Lancet Child and Adolescent Health, found that more than half of the participants (58 per cent) treated with the peanut protein could tolerate at least three to

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