RADA students demand George Bernard Shaw's name be dropped from drama school's ...

Students at RADA have called for George Bernard Shaw's name to be removed from the drama school's theatre due to his support for eugenics. 

The students have demanded the playwright's name be removed from the George Bernard Shaw Theatre (GBS Theatre) as part of an anti-racism action plan.

They have also asked the Royal Academy of Dramatic Art (RADA) to stop performing Restoration comedies due to their association with Empire, the Telegraph reported. 

The anti-racism action plan has been drawn up by RADA's student body and argues that 'RADA celebrates historical figures who embraced racist ideologies'.

Students at RADA have called for the drama school's George Bernard Shaw Theatre to be renamed due to playwright's (above) support of eugenics

Students at RADA have called for the drama school's George Bernard Shaw Theatre to be renamed due to playwright's (above) support of eugenics

The student body have given an anti-racism action plan to the Royal Academy of Dramatic Art (RADA), arguing that 'Rada celebrates historical figures who embraced racist ideologies'

The student body have given an anti-racism action plan to the Royal Academy of Dramatic Art (RADA), arguing that 'Rada celebrates historical figures who embraced racist ideologies'

Speaking of re-naming the GBS Theatre, the plan says: 'This man spoke in support of eugenics and fascism.'

Irish playwright Bernard Shaw supported eugenics in his writing and lectured for the Eugenic Education Society.

Great playwright who praised Hitler in 1935 

George Bernard Shaw, born on July 6, 1856, was an Irish playwright and the recipient of the 1925 Nobel Prize in Literature.

He wrote more than 60 plays, including Man and Superman in 1902 and Saint Joan in 1923.

One of his most-recognised works is Pygmalion - which My Fair Lady, starring Audrey Hepburn, was later based on. 

His success was cemented with plays such as Caesar and Cleopatra, Major Barbara and The Doctor's Dilemma.

Shaw expressed contentious views, including promoting eugenics and alphabet reform, which had little effect on his success as a dramatist.

He controversially denounced both sides in the First World War as equally deserving blame, as well as opposing vaccination and organised religion.

In the late 1920s, he spoke favourably of dictatorships of both the right and left, expressing admiration for Mussolini and Stalin - as well as voicing praise for Hitler in 1935.

Shaw made fewer declarations later in his life but continued to write until his death, aged 94, on November 2, 1950.

He refused all state honours, including the Order of Merit in 1946. 

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Shaw even voiced praise for Hitler in 1935, as well as expressing admiration for Mussolini and Stalin. 

Shaw did not follow the popular idea among eugenicists of 'controlled breeding' for humans, but controversially argued that natural instinct, unrestricted by social forces, would guide reproduction.

He argued: 'The only fundamental and possible socialism is the socialisation of the selective breeding of man.'

Shaw also controversially promoted alphabet reform, a movement to reform the spelling to the English language to be more consistent and match pronunciation. 

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