'Open up NOW': Dan Andrews savaged by bosses of Australia's biggest companies ...

Australia's corporate bosses are pressuring Victorian Premier Daniel Andrews to immediately remove Melbourne's 'wartime' night curfews, saying they 'don't make sense'.

The chief executive of health firm CSL Paul Perreault called for the curfews to be immediately lifted and urged Mr Andrews to rethink his 'roadmap' out of lockdown. 

'I don't see (curfew) happening anywhere else in the world. No one is using curfews … I don't see the rationale for it frankly,' Mr Perreault told The Australian.

'From what I have seen of [Mr Andrews' roadmap] and read of it, it seems to be inconsistent and using data that doesn’t make a lot of logical sense.' 

BHP Chairman Ken MacKenzie

CSL Chief Executive Paul Perreault

BHP Chairman Ken MacKenzie (left) and CSL Chief Executive Paul Perreault (right) have called on Victorian Premier Daniel Andrews to end the curfew and review the strict lockdown

Pressure is rising as hundreds took to Melbourne's streets for a second day in a row to protest. Pictured: a protester is detained at Melbourne's Queen Victoria Market on Sunday

Pressure is rising as hundreds took to Melbourne's streets for a second day in a row to protest. Pictured: a protester is detained at Melbourne's Queen Victoria Market on Sunday

CSL is a beneficiary of the Federal Government's $1.7 billion vaccine deal, and is set to produce 84.8 million doses if and when one is approved.  

The Morrison Government turned on Victoria's Labor premier in late August over the strict lockdowns and has since repeatedly accused Mr Andrews of 'unacceptable' failures. 

The CSL chief said he was not interested in scoring political points, however, and offered his company's scientific resources including data scientists to help Mr Andrews change course.

Joining CSL was BHP chairman Ken MacKenzie who said the shutdown was damaging livelihoods and the economy beyond repair.

'I support the view that businesses with clear and effective workplace protocols should be allowed to return to work in a staged, sensible manner,' he said.  

Wesfarmers Managing Director Rob Scott

Victorian Premier Daniel Andrews

Wesfarmers Managing Director Rob Scott (left) has joined the corporate voices slamming Victorian Premier Daniel Andrews (right) for the strict curfew and lockdowns

Melbourne's lockdown restrictions will ease signficantly in Step Two which is expected on September 28 so long as the 14-day new case average (pictured) falls below 50 per day

Melbourne's lockdown restrictions will ease signficantly in Step Two which is expected on September 28 so long as the 14-day new case average (pictured) falls below 50 per day

Wesfarmers Managing Director Rob Scott also added his voice to the calls for a review of the modelling.

'The impact on isolation, loneliness, depression is reaching a crisis point … curfews undermine confidence for no discernible health benefit. It shouldn't be the case of the "computer says no",' he said. 

Five million Melbournians have been banned from leaving their homes from 8pm to 5am since August 2 under strict Stage Four lockdowns.  

Premier Andrews personally made the call to introduce Melbourne's curfew and has remained unrepentant despite mounting pressure.

Health experts including the Grattan Institute's Stephen Duckett have said there is 'very, very limited' epidemiological evidence to support a curfew. 

Mr Andrews defended his 'captain's call' by saying it wasn't about the virus directly but about making it easier for police to enforce the lockdown rules.

'These are hard rules to enforce,' he told reporters at his daily media briefing on Tuesday.

'We reckon there's a bunch of people that are out when they shouldn't be out, and a curfew ... is much easier for Victoria police.' 

However, Victoria Police Chief Commissioner Shane Patton said on Thursday that the curfew was introduced with no input from Victoria Police. 

'The reality is, I was never consulted,' Mr Patton told 3AW. 

Mr Andrews was also forced to retract his previous claim that he had taken advice about the curfew from Victoria's Chief Health Officer Brett Sutton, after he revealed he hadn't recommend the curfew either. 

Tensions have been rising in Victoria under the strict lockdowns imposed when daily new infections spiked to more than 700 a day as the outbreak spread out of control in late July and early August.

Hoping for a reprieve when Premier Andrews announced the long-awaited road map out of the crisis, Victorians were disappointed at facing a long, difficult and complicated four-step process. 

The conservative road map is designed to avoid a devastating third wave, which would mean restrictions would have to be reimposed.

It has sparked anger from businesses large and small who fear the economic impact of the virus will damage them for years. 

Hundreds gathered in Melbourne's CBD to protest against lockdowns and several people were detained by police on Sunday

Hundreds gathered in Melbourne's CBD to protest against lockdowns and several people were detained by police on Sunday

'Protesters started grabbing fruit and throwing it at police,' photographer Erik Anderson said from the scene at Melbourne's Queen Victoria Market on Sunday

'Protesters started grabbing fruit and throwing it at police,' photographer Erik Anderson said from the scene at Melbourne's Queen Victoria Market on Sunday

Former Australian Competition & Consumer Commission chairman Graeme Samuel told The Australian that the lockdown had forced many small businesses to close and they would not be re-opening - ever.

Riled by tough restrictions and encouraged by political

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