Kate Middleton unveils 100 photos of how the world has coped under coronavirus

She said she wanted photographs that captured a 'snapshot of life during lockdown'.

And that's exactly what the Duchess of Cambridge has amassed.

Hold Still, a photography initiative launched by Kate with the National Portrait Gallery, attracted more than 31,000 entries from members of the public in just six weeks.

With the help of a judging panel comprising Nicholas Cullinan, director of the gallery; poet Lemn Sissay; Ruth May, Chief Nursing Officer for England; and photographer Maryam Wahid, the Duchess has whittled these down to 100 'finalists' whose work goes on display in a digital exhibition at www.npg.org/holdstill today.

The Queen has also written a special message of congratulations to all those who submitted an image. She said: 'The Duchess of Cambridge and I were inspired to see how the photographs have captured the resilience of the British people at such a challenging time, whether that is through celebrating frontline workers, recognising community spirit or showing the efforts of individuals supporting those in need.'

The 100 images selected include:

1: The Look Of Lockdown

By Lotti Sofia. Location, London

Lotti says of the image: 'This is my lockdown pal, Pepter. Lockdown has forced a large majority of us into mandatory stillness. We've felt lonely, sad, worried, confused, anxious and everything in between, but we are grateful for every key worker, our health and for the humanity and empathy that has grown out of this dreary time.'

The Look Of Lockdown by Lotti Sofia. Location, London. Lotti says of the image: 'This is my lockdown pal, Pepter. Lockdown has forced a large majority of us into mandatory stillness. We've felt lonely, sad, worried, confused, anxious and everything in between, but we are grateful for every key worker, our health and for the humanity and empathy that has grown out of this dreary time

The Look Of Lockdown by Lotti Sofia. Location, London. Lotti says of the image: 'This is my lockdown pal, Pepter. Lockdown has forced a large majority of us into mandatory stillness. We've felt lonely, sad, worried, confused, anxious and everything in between, but we are grateful for every key worker, our health and for the humanity and empathy that has grown out of this dreary time

2: Sami

By Grey Hutton. Hackney, London

Grey says: 'I met Sami on his first day volunteering at a food bank in Hackney. Sami, who is from Sudan, had just moved into an apartment overlooking the food hub. He saw what was happening below, and came down to lend a hand. It's everyday acts of kindness like his that have brought communities together through this crisis.'

Sami By Grey Hutton. Hackney, London. Grey says: 'I met Sami on his first day volunteering at a food bank in Hackney. Sami, who is from Sudan, had just moved into an apartment overlooking the food hub. He saw what was happening below, and came down to lend a hand. It's everyday acts of kindness like his that have brought communities together through this crisis'

Sami By Grey Hutton. Hackney, London. Grey says: 'I met Sami on his first day volunteering at a food bank in Hackney. Sami, who is from Sudan, had just moved into an apartment overlooking the food hub. He saw what was happening below, and came down to lend a hand. It's everyday acts of kindness like his that have brought communities together through this crisis'

3: Everyday Hero Richard

By Arnhel de Serra, London

Arnhel says: 'When I drove past Richard I had to do a double take, as I couldn't believe he was out on his postman's round in fancy dress. Given the doomsday scenario that the media were portraying in the early days of the Covid 19 pandemic, I felt very strongly that here was a man who had something positive to offer his community.'

Everyday Hero Richard by Arnhel de Serra, London. Arnhel says: 'When I drove past Richard I had to do a double take, as I couldn't believe he was out on his postman's round in fancy dress. Given the doomsday scenario that the media were portraying in the early days of the Covid 19 pandemic, I felt very strongly that here was a man who had something positive to offer his community'

Everyday Hero Richard by Arnhel de Serra, London. Arnhel says: 'When I drove past Richard I had to do a double take, as I couldn't believe he was out on his postman's round in fancy dress. Given the doomsday scenario that the media were portraying in the early days of the Covid 19 pandemic, I felt very strongly that here was a man who had something positive to offer his community' 

4: Never Without Her Grandma

By Melanie Lowis, Teddington, south-west London

Melanie says; 'Millie, five, made a cut-out of her much-loved grandma. Millie sees grandma almost daily and lockdown prevented the pair from seeing each other. When lockdown ends, and the real grandma can return, it will be a very emotional reunion.'

Never Without Her Grandma by Melanie Lowis, Teddington, south-west London. Melanie says; 'Millie, five, made a cut-out of her much-loved grandma. Millie sees grandma almost daily and lockdown prevented the pair from seeing each other. When lockdown ends, and the real grandma can return, it will be a very emotional reunion'

Never Without Her Grandma by Melanie Lowis, Teddington, south-west London. Melanie says; 'Millie, five, made a cut-out of her much-loved grandma. Millie sees grandma almost daily and lockdown prevented the pair from seeing each other. When lockdown ends, and the real grandma can return, it will be a very emotional reunion'

5: Thank You

By Wendy Huson, Liverpool

'Wendy says: Our little girl, Amelia, has Down's syndrome. I made her a very simple nurses outfit and then took the picture in our kitchen to celebrate International Nurses Day. We wanted to put a special post on her social media accounts thanking all of the nurses for the amazing work they do every day and especially during the Covid 19 pandemic.'

Thank You By Wendy Huson, Liverpool. Wendy says: Our little girl, Amelia, has Down's syndrome. I made her a very simple nurses outfit and then took the picture in our kitchen to celebrate International Nurses Day. We wanted to put a special post on her social media accounts thanking all of the nurses for the amazing work they do every day and especially during the Covid 19 pandemic'

Thank You By Wendy Huson, Liverpool. Wendy says: Our little girl, Amelia, has Down's syndrome. I made her a very simple nurses outfit and then took the picture in our kitchen to celebrate International Nurses Day. We wanted to put a special post on her social media accounts thanking all of the nurses for the amazing work they do every day and especially during the Covid 19 pandemic'

6: Holding Tight

By Katy Rudd and Joe Wyer, Redhill, Surrey

Katy and Joe say: 'This photograph was taken on the commemorations of VE Day on May 8. During lockdown we couldn't see our family or friends. On VE Day, we had a picnic and our neighbours did the same. Lockdown had been hard, but it had brought our community together.'

Holding Tight By Katy Rudd and Joe Wyer. Redhill, Surrey. Katy and Joe say: 'This photograph was taken on the commemorations of VE Day on May 8. During lockdown we couldn't see our family or friends. On VE Day, we had a picnic and our neighbours did the same. Lockdown had been hard, but it had brought our community together'

Holding Tight By Katy Rudd and Joe Wyer. Redhill, Surrey. Katy and Joe say: 'This photograph was taken on the commemorations of VE Day on May 8. During lockdown we couldn't see our family or friends. On VE Day, we had a picnic and our neighbours did the same. Lockdown had been hard, but it had brought our community together'

Other works included are This is What Broken Looks Like by Ceri Hayles, Glass Kisses by Steph James and Forever Holding Hands by Hayley Evans.

The Queen has said she was 'inspired' by the results of a photographic lockdown project led by the Duchess of Cambridge.

Kate and a panel of judges selected 100 images from more than 31,000 entries for the Hold Still digital exhibition, which launched with the National Portrait Gallery in May.

People of all ages across the UK were invited to submit a photo which they had taken during lockdown, and in the six weeks that the project was open 31,598 images were submitted. 

This is What Broken Looks Like by Ceri Hayles. The Queen has said she was 'inspired' by the results of a photographic lockdown project led by the Duchess of Cambridge

This is What Broken Looks Like by Ceri Hayles. The Queen has said she was 'inspired' by the results of a photographic lockdown project led by the Duchess of Cambridge

Glass Kisses by Steph James. Kate and a panel of judges selected 100 images from more than 31,000 entries for the Hold Still digital exhibition, which launched with the National Portrait Gallery in May

Glass Kisses by Steph James. Kate and a panel of judges selected 100 images from more than 31,000 entries for the Hold Still digital exhibition, which launched with the National Portrait Gallery in May

Forever Holding Hands by Hayley Evans. People of all ages across the UK were invited to submit a photo which they had taken during lockdown, and in the six weeks that the project was open 31,598 images were submitted

Forever Holding Hands by Hayley Evans. People of all ages across the UK were invited to submit a photo which they had taken during lockdown, and in the six weeks that the project was open 31,598 images were submitted

Tony Hudgell's 10k walk for Evelina London by David Tett. As the exhibition went live on Monday, the Queen said: 'It was with great pleasure that I had the opportunity to look through a number of the portraits that made the final 100 images for the Hold Still photography project'

Tony Hudgell's 10k walk for Evelina London by David Tett. As the exhibition went live on Monday, the Queen said: 'It was with great pleasure that I had the opportunity to look through a number of the portraits that made the final 100 images for the Hold Still photography project'

Francks Fight by Anna Hewitt. The Queen said: 'The Duchess of Cambridge and I were inspired to see how the photographs have captured the resilience of the British people at such a challenging time, whether that is through celebrating frontline workers, recognising community spirit or showing the efforts of individuals supporting those in need'

Francks Fight by Anna Hewitt. The Queen said: 'The Duchess of Cambridge and I were inspired to see how the photographs have captured the resilience of the British people at such a challenging time, whether that is through celebrating frontline workers, recognising community spirit or showing the efforts of individuals supporting those in need'

Street artist at work by Victoria Stokes. 'The Duchess of Cambridge and I send our best wishes and congratulations to all those who submitted a portrait to the project,' the Queen said

Street artist at work by Victoria Stokes. 'The Duchess of Cambridge and I send our best wishes and congratulations to all those who submitted a portrait to the project,' the Queen said

As the exhibition went live on Monday, the Queen said: 'It was with great pleasure that I had the opportunity to look

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