Unarmed autistic boy, 13, shot by Salt Lake City cops will experience lifelong ...

A 13-year-old autistic boy who was shot by police in Salt Lake City a little over a week ago is 'lucky to be alive' and will likely experience lifelong injuries, the family's lawyer said Friday.

Linden, whom the family wants referred to only by his first name, remains hospitalized with bullets still in his body and is suffering from 'pierced organs' and 'shattered bones,' attorney Zach Weyher wrote in an email.

The shooting made national headlines during a time when advocates are calling for police reform targeting excessive force by officers.

'Emergency assistance was requested to deescalate a situation involving a neurologically diverse child,' Weyher wrote. 'That request ended with an unarmed 13-year-old boy shot multiple times and lying on that ground as officers met him handcuffs rather than helping hands.'

Salt Lake Mayor Erin Mendenhall said in a statement late Sunday that the shooting was a tragedy and called for a swift and transparent investigation. 

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Linden, whom the family wants referred to only by his first name, remains hospitalized with bullets still in his body and is suffering from 'pierced organs' and 'shattered bones,' attorney Zach Weyher wrote in an email

Linden, whom the family wants referred to only by his first name, remains hospitalized with bullets still in his body and is suffering from 'pierced organs' and 'shattered bones,' attorney Zach Weyher wrote in an email

His family's attorney said the 13-year-old is 'lucky to be alive' and will likely experience lifelong injuries after being shot by Salt Lake City police last week

Linden, 13

His family's attorney said the 13-year-old is 'lucky to be alive' and will likely experience lifelong injuries after being shot by Salt Lake City police last week 

More details are expected emerge when police body camera footage is released, which is required within 10 days of an incident under a city ordinance.

Linden was shot on September 4 by police who responded to his mother's call for a crisis intervention team (CIT) when her son started suffering severe separation anxiety over her going back to work. 

His mother, Golda Barton, said that police told her CIT would 'deescalate the situation using the most minimal force possible' at her Glendale home. 

Following the shooting, the emotional mother explained to East Idaho News that Linden 'was scared' and 'he was running' but he wasn't being violent 'at all' when police arrived.

'I just want to know why they would do such a thing. Like why, … why didn't you do anything else,

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