Ruth Bader Ginsburg's granddaughter reveals how she dictated dying wish

Ruth Bader Ginsburg's Harvard lawyer granddaughter has revealed she dictated the Supreme Court Justice's dying wish on her computer and says her grandmother had no regrets about not stepping down so Barack Obama could have appointed a replacement. 

Clara Spera also said in an interview with BBC's Newshour on Monday that her grandmother tried to keep politics out of the Supreme Court and that she didn't realize until it was too late that the nomination process would become as 'fraught as it had under President '.

During the interview, Spera - who affectionately called her grandmother 'Bubbie' - opened up for the first time about the circumstances surrounding Ginsberg's final wish that she shouldn't be replaced until after a 'new president is installed'. 

'In the final days of her life, I asked my grandmother if there was anything she wanted to say to the public, to anyone that wasn't already out there,' Spera said. 

'I pulled out my computer and she dictated the following sentence to me. She said: 'My most fervent wish is that I will not be replaced until a new president is installed'.

'I read it back to it and she was very happy with it. When I asked 'is that it, is there anything else you'd like to say?'. She said 'the rest of my work is a matter of public record'. So that's all she wanted to add.' 

Ruth Bader Ginsburg's Harvard lawyer granddaughter Clara Spera (above) opened up on Monday for the first time about the circumstances surrounding Ginsberg's dying wish that she not be replaced until after a 'new president is installed'

Ruth Bader Ginsburg's Harvard lawyer granddaughter Clara Spera (above) opened up on Monday for the first time about the circumstances surrounding Ginsberg's dying wish that she not be replaced until after a 'new president is installed'

Spera's comments were published the same day  cast doubt on Ginsberg's final wish by alleging that it was actually written by a Democrat.

It marks the first time she has publicly spoken about Ginsberg's comments, which initially only came to light after being quoted in an obituary written by one of Ginsberg's friends, National Public Radio's Nina Totenberg. 

Elsewhere in the interview, Spera was asked if Ginsberg had any regrets about not stepping down earlier so President Barack Obama could have appointed his pick for a Supreme Court Justice.      

Clara Spera, who is a Harvard Law graduate who affectionately called her grandmother 'Bubbie', said on Monday that Ginsberg tried to keep politics out of the Supreme Court

Clara Spera, who is a Harvard Law graduate who affectionately called her grandmother 'Bubbie', said on Monday that Ginsberg tried to keep politics out of the Supreme Court

'She never expressed that regret to me. My grandmother fundamentally was someone who believed in the institutions that she served and the fundamental institutions of American governance - the senate, the house, the presidency,' Spera said.  

'For her, keeping politics out of the Supreme Court was a very important thing. She was confirmed by the Senate 96-3 and one of her biggest boosters at the time was a very Republican senator Orrin Hatch. 

'She never imagined, until it was far too late, that the Supreme Court nomination and confirmation process would have become as fraught as it had under President .

'I don't think she had regret because she didn't step down

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