Boost for Brexit talks after both sides make key concessions as deadline looms

Brexit trade talks could enter their final stages this week after both sides made key concessions.

If the latest round of discussions – which begin tomorrow – goes well, it is expected that negotiators will begin the process to finalise a deal.

However, doubts still linger in Brussels, with EU leaders and diplomats accusing London of lacking 'credible' ideas to break the deadlock.

Brexit trade talks could enter their final stages this week after Lord Frost (pictured), the UK's negotiator, and the EU made key concessions

Brexit trade talks could enter their final stages this week after Lord Frost (pictured), the UK's negotiator, and the EU made key concessions 

Reports yesterday suggested that both the UK and Brussels are giving ground to avoid the double negative economic impact of coronavirus and No Deal at the end of the year.

Lord Frost, the UK's negotiator, and his EU counterpart, Michel Barnier, are said to be preparing to finalise details by the end of this week. 

Should talks go well, they hope to enter 'the tunnel', in which final details of the deal will be hammered out in total secrecy over two weeks. 

This would mean that a final agreement would be in place just after the next EU summit in Brussels in mid-October.

EU's Brexit negotiator Michel Barnier (pictured) and Lord Frost are said to be preparing to finalise details by the end of this week

EU's Brexit negotiator Michel Barnier (pictured) and Lord Frost are said to be preparing to finalise details by the end of this week

Boris Johnson is believed to want a Brexit deal and is coming under pressure to secure one from Cabinet members. 

Cabinet Minister Michael Gove, who is in charge of No Deal planning, is said to be 'terrified' of the effects of a combination of a second coronavirus wave and a failure to reach a trade deal, the Sunday Times reported.

Both sides are said to have made concessions that give those involved hope a deal may be reached.

Brussels is said to have watered down its demands for checks on the movement of goods between Great Britain and Northern Ireland.

In return, the UK would agree to adhere to some 'baseline rules' over the use of state aid to prop up British businesses.

This would mean that Mr Johnson would be able to say the UK was not fully aligned to EU rules as Brussels has been demanding. 

Both sides will then agree a dispute mechanism.

While No 10 officials have warned against the idea that a deal is done, members of Lord Frost's team are reported to have privately said: 'There will be a deal.'

In a statement, Lord Frost said: 'An agreement is still very much possible, but equally very far from certain. 

'The last two weeks of informal talks have been relatively positive, but

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