says that he has fully authorized the total declassification of documents

President has been given at least three potent drugs since announcing he tested positive for COVID-19 on Thursday night: Regeneron's cocktail of lab-made antibodies, the antiviral remdesivir, and the steroid dexamethasone. 

Two of those medications are still experimental for treating COVID-19, and have given emergency use authorization by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). 

And White House physician Dr Sean Conley admitted on Monday that he would not disclose every single medication that the president is currently receiving (citing HIPAA patient privacy laws, which suggests that himself gave Dr Conley permission to disclose some of his medications, but not all of them). 

Remdesivir, dexamethasone and the antibody cocktail are all in ongoing trials - but it's unclear if anyone besides the US Commander-in-Chief has ever been treated with all three. 

Those three drugs are 'as much as we know [about the president's treatment regimen] - but I found it all really confusing, based on the reports,' Dr Mark Poznansky, an infectious disease specialist at Massachusetts General Hospital told DailyMail.com. 

When asked if there was any precedent for treating a COVID-19 patient with all three drugs, Dr Poznansky replied, 'no.' 

'But the individual decisions are based on the individual patient, and all bets are off when you're dealing with the president, the commander-in chief,' he added. 

'The implication is that the doctors believe that the risk of using these is outweighed by the potential benefit.' 

And while we have some clarity on the potential side effects of each of the  drugs, how they might interact is a mystery, 'because they just haven't been used frequently enough...we don't know about the combination,' Dr Poznansky said.  

But even on their own, the side effects of these drugs could be particularly concerning for the president, considering that the steroid can cause mood swings, confusion and aggression. 

The drugs he was treated with and their potential side effects are:  

REGENERON'S EXPERIMENTAL ANTIBODY COCKTAIL DRUG

WHEN HE GOT IT: received a single 8 gram dose of Regeneron's cocktail of lab-made antibodies on Friday. 

WHAT IT DOES: REGN-COV2 is a combination of two lab-made versions of antibodies that help block the coronavirus from entering cells. 

One of the antibodies in the 'cocktail' is based on an antibody that mice produce in response to coronavirus, while the other is based on an antibody isolated from the one of the first US COVID-19 patients. 

The hope is that the treatment drives down viral load, keeping it from overrunning the body and sending the immune system haywire, and preventing the infection from becoming severe. 

WHAT THE DATA SAYS: REGN-COV2 is still in early trial phases, but the first data from its clinical trial found that it dramatically lowered viral load within a week and cut recovery time in half in patients that weren't sick enough to be hospitalized. 

Regeneron has not yet studied the drug in severely ill patients. 

THE POSSIBLE SIDE EFFECTS: The main concern is these types of

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