Army stops deliveries of Apache helicopters from Boeing

The U.S Army has ceased deliveries of Apache attack helicopters from Boeing after an Arizona factory employee kept 'improper' records about aircraft parts, report said. 

The employee responsible for the record-keeping 'no longer works at Boeing', a source told Defence One.  

As a result, Army officials revealed to Defense One that they've recently stopped accepting Apache helicopters, or AH-64 aircrafts, until further notice.

'At this time the Army is still conducting a comprehensive review of a number of Boeing processes, production, and manufacturing plans for critical safety items applicable to all AH-64E aircraft production,' spokesperson Lt. Col. Brandon Kelley said. 

Kelley added that at no time were soldiers lives put at risk. 

The 'improper record keeping' reportedly involved parts installed in the aircraft during production at Boeing's AH-64 Apache factory in Mesa, Arizona. 

Army officials have stopped Apache helicopter (pictured) deliveries from Boeing after a factory worker in Mesa, Arizona, kept 'improper' records 

The plant in Mesa where the employee had kept improper records overhauls old Apaches with modern equipment and builds new new ones. The company will continue to build new aircraft only while the situation is investigated. 

When Beoing officials learned of its discrepancies, they alerted the Army immediately. 

Steve Parker, vice president and general manager of Boeing Vertical Lift, added in a statement to Defense One that the factory was under review.

'Boeing and the government are jointly reviewing our Mesa quality management processes and procedures,' Parker told the publication.

'Flight operations and deliveries will resume when Boeing and the Army are satisfied this issue has been resolved and appropriate corrective action plans have been implemented.'

After learning of the incident at the Arizona factory, Boeing reportedly contacted Army officials immediately

After learning of the incident at the Arizona factory, Boeing reportedly contacted Army officials immediately 

It is the latest blow to Boeing, which is still reeling from the widespread fallout over its two 737 Max crashes.

The 737 Max has been shelved worldwide since March 2019 after two crashes that killed 346 people.  

On October 29, 2018, a Lion Air flight 610 crashed into the Java Sea just 13 minutes after taking off from Jakarta, Indonesia. 

The flight crew made a distress call shortly before losing control but the crash killed 189 people.

The aircraft was almost brand-new, having arrived at Lion Air just three months earlier.

The Lion Air flight 610 crashed into the Java Sea on October 29, 2018, 13 minutes after takeoff from Jakarta, Indonesia. The fatal crash killed 189 people on board (pictured, investigators examine parts of the plane recovered from the sea)

The Lion Air flight 610 crashed into the Java Sea on October 29, 2018, 13 minutes after takeoff from Jakarta, Indonesia. The fatal crash killed 189 people on board (pictured, investigators examine parts of the plane recovered from the sea)

The Lion Air plane was almost brand-new, having arrived just three months earlier. Pictured, debris from the Lion Air crash is examined

The Lion Air plane was almost brand-new, having arrived just three months earlier. Pictured, debris from the Lion Air crash is examined

Less than five months later, a second crash occurred on March 10, 2019, when the Ethiopian Airlines flight 302 crashed, killing all 149 passengers and eight crew members on board.

The aircraft had departed from Addis Ababa Bole International Airport and was bound for Nairobi, Kenya. 

Just after takeoff, the pilot radioed a distress call and was given immediate clearance to turn around and land.

But the plane crashed 40 miles from the airport, just six minutes after leaving the runway. The aircraft involved was only four months old.

The grounding of the 737 Max triggered lawsuits and investigations by Congress and the Department of Justice. 

Questions were also raised about the FAA and Boeing's safety approval process.

Pictured: Rescuers conduct search operation in the waters of Ujung Karawang, West Java, Indonesia after a Lion Air plane crashed into the sea

Pictured: Rescuers conduct search operation in the waters of Ujung Karawang, West Java, Indonesia after a Lion Air plane crashed into the sea

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Army spokesperson: 'The Army will begin acceptance of aircraft once conditions have been satisfied to ensure production processes meet standards for safety and quality and the potential for future quality escapes has been fully mitigated'

Army spokesperson: 'The Army will begin acceptance of aircraft once conditions have been satisfied to ensure production processes meet standards for safety and quality and the potential for future quality escapes has been fully mitigated' 

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