Prince Harry will not attend the Remembrance Sunday service next month

Prince Harry will not be joining the Royals for this year's Remembrance Sunday service.

Members of the Royal Family and dignitaries will attend the Cenotaph next month to lay wreaths to remember the fallen in an event which has been scaled down due to coronavirus.

It is expected that Prince Charles, Prince William and Princess Anne will lay wreaths while the Queen, Kate and Camilla will line up on the Foreign Office balcony. 

Palace sources have said that Prince Harry will not be able to attend Remembrance Sunday service in an official capacity as part of the Royal Family as he is no longer a 'working royal'

Palace sources have said that Prince Harry will not be able to attend Remembrance Sunday service in an official capacity as part of the Royal Family as he is no longer a 'working royal'

Members of the military are joined by dignitaries and thousands of members of the public to mark Remembrance Sunday last year but this year the event will be closed to the public

Members of the military are joined by dignitaries and thousands of members of the public to mark Remembrance Sunday last year but this year the event will be closed to the public 

The Cenotaph was guarded by police in June earlier this year and is celebrating 100 years

The Cenotaph was guarded by police in June earlier this year and is celebrating 100 years

But palace sources have told the Sun as he is 'no longer a working royal' he 'cannot join his family at the Cenotaph'.

The traditional 11am service in London which is usually attended by thousands of people lining the streets will this year only allow a limited number of people to attend. 

But the legion's previous hopes to still be able to hold the service with the famous military march with restrictive measures, have been dashed.

Some veterans will be invited to attend the service, which will be made Covid-secure.

It will be the first time in the Cenotaph's 100-year history when the poignant tribute to all those who've died in war will be closed off. 

Other services across the country are also being scaled back, in light of the second wave of the pandemic.

Many expected Harry to attend the service because of his military background. 

But the source told the Sun: 'He would be able to attend in his capacity as a former soldier who served his country well in Afghanistan.

'He won't be able to attend in a royal capacity as he is no longer a working royal.' 

Many anticipated Prince Harry would attend in recognition of his service in the military. Pictured: Prince Harry salutes as the Last Post is played as he joins British troops in Afghanistan for a Remembrance Sunday service at Kandahar Airfield in November 2014

Many anticipated Prince Harry would attend in recognition of his service in the military. Pictured: Prince Harry salutes as the Last Post is played as he joins British troops in Afghanistan for a Remembrance Sunday service at Kandahar Airfield in November 2014

Around 10,000 people usually gather at the Cenotaph each year for the National Service of Remembrance and the two minute silence at 11 AM.

This year, for the first time in history, the event will be closed to members of the public in line with the latest expert medical and scientific advice. 

A century of Cenotaph

The Cenotaph was designed by Sir Edward Lutyens

read more from dailymail.....

PREV Coronavirus England: 17 victims of second wave of infection under 40
NEXT Troubled girl, 16, takes her own life on school grounds