Amy Coney Barrett is sworn in by Justice Clarence Thomas as a Supreme Court ...

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1 min ago Amy Coney Barrett sworn in as Supreme Court justice
President Donald Trump looks toward Amy Coney Barrett, before Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas administers the Constitutional Oath to her on the South Lawn of the White House in Washington, on Monday.President Donald looks toward Amy Coney Barrett, before Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas administers the Constitutional Oath to her on the South Lawn of the White House in Washington, on Monday. Patrick Semansky/AP

Amy Coney Barrett was sworn in by Justice Clarence Thomas as a Supreme Court justice at a White House ceremony tonight.

Thomas administered the official Constitutional Oath to Barrett during the outdoor ceremony.

"The oath that I have solemnly taken tonight means at its core that I will do my job without any fear or favor and that I will do so independently of both the political branches and of my own preferences. I love the Constitution and the democratic republic that it establishes and I will devote myself to preserving it," Barrett said.

Barrett, who is 48 years old, is likely to serve on the court for decades and will give conservatives a 6-3 majority on the Supreme Court, a shift in its makeup that could have dramatic implications for a range of issues that could come before it, including the future of the Affordable Care Act and any potential disputes regarding the 2020 election.

10 min ago Barrett says she will serve "independently" from political branches and her own preferences

From CNN's Allie Malloy

In remarks following her swearing-in ceremony, Supreme Court Justice Amy Coney Barrett focused on telling Americans that she will do her job on the court “independently” from political branches, as well as her own preferences.

“My fellow Americans — even though we judges don’t face elections. We still work for you. It is your Constitution that establishes the rule of law and the judicial independence that is so central to it. The oath that I have solemnly taken tonight means at its core that I will do my job without any fear or favor and that I will do so independently of both the political branches and of my own preferences,” Barrett said in remarks from the South Lawn of the White House.

Barrett began remarks thanking President , the Senate and White House aides, calling the process “rigorous."

“It’s a privilege to be asked to serve my country in this office and I stand here tonight truly honored and humbled,” Barrett said.

Barrett also spoke about the confirmation process itself, saying it “made ever clear to me one of the fundamental differences between the federal judiciary and the United States Senate. And perhaps the most acute is the role of policy preferences.”

“It is the job of a senator to pursue her policy preferences. In fact, it would be a dereliction of duty to put policy goals aside. By contrast, it is the job of a judge to resist her policy preferences. It would be a dereliction of duty for her to give into them," she said.

“The Judicial Oath captures the essence of the judicial duty — the rule of law must always control,” Barrett said.

17 min ago tells Barrett: "The American people put their trust in you"

From CNN's Allie Malloy

President Donald Trump speaks as Amy Coney Barrett looks on, before Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas, right, administers the Constitutional Oath to her on the South Lawn of the White House in Washington on Monday.President Donald speaks as Amy Coney Barrett looks on, before Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas, right, administers the Constitutional Oath to her on the South Lawn of the White House in Washington on Monday. Patrick Semansky/AP

President spoke highly of Amy Coney Barrett during her swearing-in ceremony tonight, referring to her “sterling character."

went on to say that her “impeccable credentials were unquestioned, unchallenged and obvious to all.”

“Justice Barrett made clear she will issue rulings based solely upon a faithful reading of the law and the Constitution as written not legislate from the bench,” he said. 

told Barrett tonight: “As you take your oath tonight, the legacy of our ancestors falls to you."

“The American people put their trust in you and their faith in you as you take up the task of defending our laws, our Constitution and this country we all love," he said.

35 min ago White House implements social distancing measures at Barrett's swearing-in ceremony

From CNN's Allie Malloy and Kaitlan Collins

Texas Senator Ted Cruz sits with guests ahead of the swearing-in ceremony for Amy Coney Barrett as a US Supreme Court Associate Justice on the South Lawn of the White House October 26 in Washington.Texas Senator Ted Cruz sits with guests ahead of the swearing-in ceremony for Amy Coney Barrett as a US Supreme Court Associate Justice on the South Lawn of the White House October 26 in Washington. Nicholas Kamm/AFP/Getty Images

The White House has implemented social distancing measures at Amy Coney Barrett’s swearing-in ceremony at the White House this evening, one of the first times it has taken into consideration social distancing protocols.

The event is in sharp contrast to Barrett’s nomination announcement, which has been labeled by public health experts as a coronavirus superspreader event.

There are about 200 chairs out on the South Lawn this evening, which are separated a few feet from each other. Almost every attendee is also wearing a mask.

A number of senators were seen in the audience, including Sens. Ted Cruz, Mike Lee, James Lankford and Ron Johnson.

49 min ago Harris says she shares "the American people's outrage" over confirmation process

From CNN’s Jasmine Wright

Democratic vice presidential nominee Kamala Harris criticized Republicans in a tweet, saying they "denied the will of the American people by confirming" Judge Amy Coney Barrett.

Harris also issued a statement after Barrett's confirmation, saying “Senate Republicans jammed through this nomination in the middle of an election where over 60 million Americans have already voted."

“The American people see this confirmation for what it is: an illegitimate move that will set our country back for generations," the California senator also said in the statement. "Access to health care is now in jeopardy. Our voting rights are now in jeopardy. Workers’ rights are now in jeopardy. LGBTQ equality is now in jeopardy. The right to a safe and legal abortion is now in jeopardy. The ability to address a changing climate is now in jeopardy. And so much more."

“I share the American people’s outrage at this rushed process to confirm a nominee who has the potential to do great harm," she added.

1 hr 2 min ago hasn't made SCOTUS a major campaign point

From CNN's Kevin Liptak

President Donald Trump delivers remarks at a rally during the last full week of campaigning before the presidential election on October 26, in Allentown, Pennsylvania.President Donald delivers remarks at a rally during the last full week of campaigning before the presidential election on October 26, in Allentown, Pennsylvania. Spencer Platt/Getty Images

Even as President seeks to use Amy Coney Barrett's confirmation to the Supreme Court as a political win, the issue hasn't been as prominent during his rallies as some of his advisers had hoped.

On Monday, it took 51 minutes to mention Barrett during his rally in Allentown, Pennsylvania. It was a similar story in Lititz, where didn't mention his third Supreme Court nomination until 54 minutes into his speech.

raised the issue earlier on in his speech in Martinsburg. But generally the Supreme Court nomination has taken a backseat in his campaign speech and his political messaging.

raised the nomination more often when it was in the news, including in September when crowds chanted "fill that seat" at 's rallies. 

But since then it's been replaced by issues like 's gripes with the media, his attacks on Joe Biden and the litany of grievances against his opponents.

Some of the President's political allies wish he would use the nomination more to galvanize supporters. They see the issue as overwhelmingly positive for and question why it's not being used more on the campaign trail.

When she was nominated, some even suggested Barrett would act in appearances as another running mate for the President.

But on the campaign trail, has made his rallies mostly about himself — leaving little room in the spotlight for anyone else. 

1 hr 27 min ago Chief Justice Roberts will administer the judicial oath tomorrow
People visit the U.S. Supreme Court on Capitol Hill in Washington on Wednesday, October 21.People visit the U.S. Supreme Court on Capitol Hill in Washington on Wednesday, October 21. AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite

Chief Justice John Roberts will administer the judicial oath to Judge Amy Coney Barrett tomorrow at the US Supreme Court.

The private ceremony will take place in the East Conference Room, according to a news release from the Supreme Court.

"Upon administration of that oath, she will be able to begin to participate in the work of the Court," the release said.

A more formal investiture ceremony will take place at a later date.

1 hr 15 min ago Senate confirms Amy Coney Barrett to the US Supreme Court

From CNN's Clare Foran and Ted Barrett

Senate TV Senate TV

The Senate has voted to confirm Amy Coney Barrett to the US Supreme Court, solidifying the court's conservative majority.

The vote was 52-48.

Republican Sen. Susan Collins of Maine, who is in a tough re-election fight, was the only GOP senator to cross party lines and vote with Democrats against the nomination after having expressed concerns that it's too close to Election Day to consider a nominee.

The stakes in the Supreme Court battle are immense and come at a pivotal time in American politics in the run up to an election where control of Congress and the White House are on the line. 's appointment of a new Supreme Court justice will mark the third of his tenure in office, giving Republicans a historic opportunity to deliver on the key conservative priority and campaign promise of transforming the federal courts through lifetime appointments.

Barrett, who is 48 years old, is likely to serve on the court for decades and will give conservatives a 6-3 majority on the Supreme Court, a shift in its makeup that could have dramatic implications for a range of issues that could come before it, including the future of the Affordable Care Act and any potential disputes regarding the 2020 election.

The confirmation vote comes after Senate Republicans, who hold a majority in the upper chamber, pushed ahead with one of the quickest nomination proceedings in modern times following the death of the late Justice and liberal icon Ruth Bader Ginsburg last month.

Watch here:

1 hr 53 min ago Senate votes on Barrett's confirmation

From CNN's Clare Foran and Ted Barrett

The Senate is now taking the final vote to confirm Judge Amy Coney Barrett to the Supreme Court.

Republicans need only a simple majority vote to elevate President ’s nominee to the high court and they are on track to do so.

Republican Sen. Susan Collins of Maine, who is in a tough re-election fight, is expected to be the only

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