editor, teacher and Olympic athlete launch new campaign promoting maths ...

Numbers and equations are just as important to magazine editors and Olympic athletes as they are to mathematicians, engineers and scientists.

That's the message from the three ambassadors of a new education campaign designed to help bring mathematics back into the spotlight - and show students that it isn't as 'scary' as they think.

Former Harper's Bazaar Australia magazine editor-in-chief Kellie Hush and Olympic athlete Steven Solomon teamed up with popular YouTube teacher Eddie Woo to launch the Maths Trains Brains program.

The New South Wales government initiative comes after several questions in Monday's HSC standard mathematics exam stumped frustrated final year students.

Eddie Wu and Kellie Hush (pictured together at Tuesday's launch) are the ambassadors of a  new Maths Trains Brains program, a NSW government initiative

Eddie Wu and Kellie Hush (pictured together at Tuesday's launch) are the ambassadors of a  new Maths Trains Brains program, a NSW government initiative

The aim of the new program is to show how solving maths problems is incorporated in all aspect of our lives from sport to business to creativity, both now and into the future. 

NSW education minister Sarah Mitchell hopes to boost the number of senior high school students studying mathematics, which has dropped by 18 per cent in the last two decades to 76 per cent.

Maths will be compulsory for all students up until Year 12 by 2024 under a revised back-to-basics overhaul of the NSW school curriculum.

'No matter what field you go into after school, we all need and use maths on an every day basis,' Ms Mitchell said at Tuesday's launch.

Ms Hush hated maths at school and dropped the subject in year 11, a decision she regrets.

'I had to confess numbers weren't my forte, Excel my enemy, and I had dropped maths in year 11,' she posted on Instagram.

'If I had my time over I would have stuck with it. Probably not tried to keep up in the B class but dropped to a level I felt confident because guess what? My Copland College maths teacher was right - I use maths every day.'

Olympic 400m finalist Steven Solomon (pictured competing at the 2018 Commonwealth Games) also use maths to boost his running performance

Olympic 400m finalist Steven Solomon (pictured competing at the 2018 Commonwealth Games) also use maths to boost his running performance

She now realises how important maths is to creative industries, including .

'It affects everything you do. You create a dress - if the dress is too big, you're going to lose money in it, so every inch counts,' Ms Hush said at the launch.

'I kind of left it behind - focused on the subjects I was good at, English and drama. But you really need to stick with maths. You don't need to be that A+ student, but you do need it in any job you go into.'

Five-time Australian 400 metre champion and 2012 Olympic finalist Solomon uses maths to boost his running performance and was proud to add his insight. 

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