Woman who was preyed on by her maths teacher slams Victorian government's bill

A woman who was sexually assaulted by her school maths teacher has vowed to fight the Victorian Government's plan to jail victims or their families for speaking about rape victims.

Under laws passed in February, Victorian rape and sexual assault victims cannot choose to identify themselves publicly - such as in media reports or even autobiographies - unless they get permission from a court.

Survivors could be jailed for up to four months or face $3,000 fines for telling their stories using their real names without a court order, which could cost them at least $10,000 to obtain. 

Grace Tame, from Tasmania, was just 15 when she became the sexual target of her maths teacher, more than 40 years her senior.

Grace Tame, from Tasmania, was just 15 when she became the sexual target of her maths teacher, more than 40 years her senior. Her experience sparked the #LetHerSpeak campaign

Grace Tame, from Tasmania, was just 15 when she became the sexual target of her maths teacher, more than 40 years her senior. Her experience sparked the #LetHerSpeak campaign

The 25-year-old launched a successful Supreme Court bid to publicly self-identify as a rape survivor and the public awareness campaign has continued

The 25-year-old launched a successful Supreme Court bid to publicly self-identify as a rape survivor and the public awareness campaign has continued

He has since been jailed for rape and grooming, but Ms Tame's battle has continued as an advocate for survivors of sexual assault.

Her personal experience sparked the #LetHerSpeak campaign, which aimed to challenge laws preventing victims of sexual assault from publicly discussing the crimes.

The 25-year-old launched a successful Supreme Court bid to publicly self-identify as a rape survivor and the public awareness campaign has continued. 

Ms Tame said the bill will reinforce the idea that 'there is shame in having to endure unspeakable suffering'. 

'It's yet another example of how our society enables predators by silencing the victims, including in this case the grieving relatives,' Ms Tame told The Australian.  

'Many families want the opportunity to speak for their loved ones well after their deaths. Requiring such families to seek a court order in order to give their relative a voice requires them to engage in a costly exercise that must, by necessity, cause unnecessary trauma,' a jointly written letter to the government reads. 

The Judicial Proceedings Reports Act doesn't explicitly prohibit naming deceased victims, but the Office of Public Prosecutions launched a claim that the word 'person' in the act could in theory also apply to dead people.

The mother of Jill Meagher, who was raped and murdered while walking home from a pub in Melbourne in 2012, said she was 'f**king fuming' that the government hasn't consulted any grieving relatives who would be affected by the bill. 

'It's such a heartache on all of us who lost our precious

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