Army veteran, 99, will wear his World War Two medals for first time after they ...

A 99-year-old veteran who enlisted as a teenager has been surprised with a repaired set of his Second World War medals, allowing him to wear them for the first time.

'Humble' Ken Batt, of Loughton, Essex, had never worn the awards he received while serving with the Royal Wiltshire Yeomanry during the conflict.

But thanks to serving soldiers in his former regiment, who worked with his Mr Batt's wife-of-74-years Joyce to have the medals secretly restored, Mr Batt can proudly wear the awards on his chest in time for Remembrance Sunday.

World War Two veteran Trooper Ken Batt, 99, of the Royal Wessex Yeomanry saluting at his doorstep, having received his medals

World War Two veteran Trooper Ken Batt, 99, of the Royal Wessex Yeomanry saluting at his doorstep, having received his medals

Mr Batt was just a teenager when he signed up to the army, having earlier worked as an apprentice at the Great Western Railway company.

His passion for horses made him keen to serve with the Royal Wiltshire Yeomanry as it gave him the opportunity to develop his riding skills and he volunteered to exercise the officers' horses at weekends.

In 1939, he was deployed to the Middle East, in what was then known as Palestine, and took part in the Iraq and Syrian campaigns. 

'Humble' Mr Batt had never worn the medals he was awarded for his service in the Second World War. The medals had never been mounted for wear and had battered ribbons

'Humble' Mr Batt had never worn the medals he was awarded for his service in the Second World War. The medals had never been mounted for wear and had battered ribbons

Veteran Trooper Mr Batt of the Royal Wessex Yeomanry, in uniform during the second World War

Mr Batt (pictured) was bayoneted at the Battle of Palmyra and shot out of his tank at the Battle of El Alamein

Veteran Trooper Mr Batt of the Royal Wessex Yeomanry, in uniform during the second World War (left and right). He was bayoneted at the Battle of Palmyra and shot out of his tank at the Battle of El Alamein

Mr Batt's medals in the Guards' Tailor's shop in Wellington Barracks, London, being mounted by Sergeant Darren Hall at the request of Lieutenant colonel David Utting

Mr Batt's medals in the Guards' Tailor's shop in Wellington Barracks, London, being mounted by Sergeant Darren Hall at the request of Lieutenant colonel David Utting

He was bayoneted at the Battle of Palmyra and shot out of his tank on the first night of the Battle of El Alamein. 

But Mr Batt survived and went on to serve in Syria and in 1944 before returning to the UK after four-and-a-half years of service.

When his regiment, now part of the Royal Wessex Yeomanry, helped him mark his 99th birthday in September, it was discovered Mr Batt had never worn his medals which had battered ribbons and were wrapped up in tissue paper. 

Lieutenant Colonel David Utting arriving to hand over the medals of Mr Batt after he had them had mounted so that the veteran would be able to wear them on Remembrance Sunday

Lieutenant Colonel David Utting arriving to hand over the medals of Mr Batt after he had them had mounted so that the veteran would be able to wear them on Remembrance Sunday

Mr Batt will wear the medals on Sunday for the first time since they were issued 75 years ago

Mr Batt will wear the medals on Sunday for the first time since they were issued 75 years ago

Mr Batt sees the restored medals presented by a socially distanced Lieutenant Colonel Utting, as wife-of-74 years Joyce looks on

Mr Batt sees the restored medals presented by a socially distanced Lieutenant Colonel Utting, as wife-of-74 years Joyce looks on

Mr Batt was particularly moved to see the 8th Army bar on his Africa Star (medal second from left) because that had previously been lost

Mr Batt was particularly moved to see the 8th Army bar on his Africa Star (medal second from left) because that had previously been lost

The Royal Wiltshire Yeomanry during WW2 

In August 1939 the regiment was deployed to Palestine. Later serving in Syria, North Africa and Iraq. 

In North Africa the unit acted as a search light regiment, an air defence unit of the British Army, in the ports of Tobruk and Benghazi.

In 1941 they

read more from dailymail.....

PREV Tourist boat sinks near Turkish coast; 1 person dead
NEXT Texts North Queensland Cowboys star sent club staffer after having sex with her ...