David Cameron and Tony Blair warn foreign aid spending cuts are a 'profound ...

David Cameron said Boris Johnson's rumoured plan to cut Britain's foreign aid spending by £5billion would be a 'moral, strategic and political' error - while Tony Blair slammed the proposals as 'a profound strategic mistake'.

Intervention from the two former Prime Ministers follows reports that Boris Johnson was planning on slashing the £15 billion international development budget to help cover the UK's £210billion Covid-19 costs.

Britain currently sends 0.7 per cent of its gross national income out as foreign aid to support developing countries around the world.

But Chancellor Rishi Sunak is said to be pushing for the proportion of foreign aid to be cut to 0.5 per cent - saving around £5billion.

David Cameron (pictured, during the National Service of Remembrance) said Boris Johnson's rumoured plan to cut Britain's foreign aid spending by £5billion would be a 'moral, strategic and political' error

Tony Blair (pictured)  slammed the proposals as 'a profound strategic mistake'

David Cameron (left, during the National Service of Remembrance) said Boris Johnson's rumoured plan to cut Britain's foreign aid spending by £5billion would be a 'moral, strategic and political' error - while Tony Blair (right) slammed the proposals as 'a profound strategic mistake'

Intervention from the two former Prime Ministers follows reports that Mr Johnson (pictured) was planning on slashing the UK's £15 billion international development budget to help cover the UK's £210billion Covid-19 costs

Intervention from the two former Prime Ministers follows reports that Mr Johnson (pictured) was planning on slashing the UK's £15 billion international development budget to help cover the UK's £210billion Covid-19 costs

In a joint statement published in the Daily Telegraph, Mr Blair and Mr Cameron said the 0.2 per cent cut could risk distancing Britain from President-Elect Joe Biden before the 2021 G7 summit - which the UK will chair.

Mr Cameron said: 'Abandoning the 0.7 [per cent] target for aid would be a moral, strategic and political mistake.'

He believes it would break Britain's humanitarian pledges, weaken the country's role as a global leader and could hinder the UK's position in the G7 summit next year.

Mr Blair said changing the budget would be a 'profound strategic mistake' claiming the budget is about 'enlightened self-interest' and not charity.

He said Africa - a recipient of the UK aid - is a key strategic player in the global battle to control coronavirus, combat climate change and tackle extremism.

In 2005, Mr Blair first promised the UK would hit the 0.7 per cent foreign aid target.

In 2013 - under Mr Cameron's premiership - the target was hit and it became law two years later. 

In a joint statement published in the Daily Telegraph , Mr Blair and Mr Cameron said the 0.2 per cent cut could risk distancing Britain from President-Elect Joe Biden (pictured) at the next G7 summit - which the UK will chair in 2021

In a joint statement published in the Daily Telegraph , Mr Blair and Mr Cameron said the 0.2 per cent cut could risk distancing Britain from President-Elect Joe Biden (pictured) at the next G7 summit - which the UK will chair in 2021

Prime Minister Boris Johnson is said to be considering plans to temporarily cut the foreign aid budget

Prime Minister Boris Johnson is said to be considering plans to temporarily cut the foreign aid budget 

Chancellor Rishi Sunak reportedly wants to temporarily reduce the UK's aid commitment from 0.7 per cent of gross national income to 0.5 per cent. Housing Secretary Robert Jenrick today did not dismiss reports that the Government is considering the cut

Chancellor Rishi Sunak reportedly wants to temporarily reduce the UK's aid commitment from 0.7 per cent of gross national income to 0.5 per cent. Housing Secretary Robert Jenrick today did not dismiss reports that the Government is considering the cut

Earlier this week, Mr Johnson signalled his intention to slash Britain's foreign aid budget to help the nation's domestic finances - as he agreed to pump billions more into the Armed Forces.

The aid programme has drawn criticism in the past over some of the projects it

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