The next Uluru: Fears iconic Mount Warning could be shut to climbers

An iconic mountain could be the next Australian landmark banned to hikers for good after it was named as an Aboriginal sacred place.

Mt Warning, on the Tweed Valley coast in northern New South Wales, was closed to tourists in March this year as a precaution against crowds spreading Covid-19.

The popular scenic destination, traditionally known as Wollumbin, was scheduled to allow to sightseers back in May 2021, however, the re-opening is will now be reviewed, according to The Courier Mail. 

Mt Warning (pictured), on the Tweed Valley coast in northern New South Wales, was closed to tourists in March this year as a precaution against crowds spreading COVID-19

Mt Warning (pictured), on the Tweed Valley coast in northern New South Wales, was closed to tourists in March this year as a precaution against crowds spreading COVID-19 

The view from the summit of Mt Warning (pictured) which has become a popular tourist destination as it gets the first rays of sunlight to hit Australia

The view from the summit of Mt Warning (pictured) which has become a popular tourist destination as it gets the first rays of sunlight to hit Australia 

Tourists were banned from climbing Uluru (pictured) in central Australia in 2019 out of respect for traditional owners

Tourists were banned from climbing Uluru (pictured) in central Australia in 2019 out of respect for traditional owners 

Thousands of tourists flocked to Uluru (pictured) to climb the mountain before it was closed to the public, though tourists can  continue to walk around the base

Thousands of tourists flocked to Uluru (pictured) to climb the mountain before it was closed to the public, though tourists can  continue to walk around the base 

Since the last tourists ascended Uluru in 2019, debate has arisen around whether climbers should be allowed on other natural landmarks such as Wollumbin and the nearby Mt Beerwah on Queensland's Sunshine Coast. 

The National Parks and Wildlife Service said the delay to re-opening Wollumbin was to assess safety issues around landslides and the chain section of the hike, but also said they would be holding discussions with Indigenous groups. 

'NPWS will now consider the future of the summit track, in consultation with key community and tourism stakeholders, including local Aboriginal Elders and knowledge holders,' a spokesperson said.

A hiker (pictured) enjoys the early morning view from the summit of Mt Warning on Australia's east coast

A hiker (pictured) enjoys the early morning view from the summit of Mt Warning on Australia's east coast 

One of the last climbers on Uluru, who was accompanied by his teenage sons, looks out over the view part way down the descent

One of the last climbers on Uluru, who was accompanied by his teenage sons, looks out over the view part way down the descent

WHY DID ABORIGINAL ELDERS ASK FOR A BAN ON CLIMBING ULURU? 

It was announced in November 2017 that climbing Uluru, considered a sacred site by the local Anangu people, would be banned from October 26, 2019.

Uluru-Kata Tjuta National Park's board of management, made up of a majority of Aboriginal traditional owners, unanimously decided to close the climb.

Traditional owner and board chairman Sammy Wilson said on behalf of the Anangu people it was time to do so.

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