Celebrations marking the arrival of the Pilgrims on the Mayflower go without ...

Like nearly every holiday or commemorative event in 2020, celebrations for the 400th anniversary of the historic Mayflower voyage were canceled or postponed this year due to the coronavirus pandemic. 

The nation this month was set to mark the anniversary of arguably one of the most important dates in American history, the day the first pilgrims arrived from England to what we now know as Plymouth, Massachusetts on November 21, 1620. 

Dozens of events had been planned by Plymouth 400, Inc, a nonprofit in charge of organizing celebratory programs, before being pushed back to 2021 earlier this year.

The renovation and subsequent trans-Atlantic voyage of the Mayflower II, a replica of the 17th century ship, has been also delayed until next year. 

Yet, the anniversary of what many would argue marked the founding of the nation, has come with little fanfare elsewhere, during a year marred not only by a pandemic but by nationwide unrest over systemic racism. 

November 21, 2020 is the 400th anniversary of the day the Mayflower arrived at what we now know as Plymouth, Massachusetts. (Pictured: The Mayflower II)

November 21, 2020 is the 400th anniversary of the day the Mayflower arrived at what we now know as Plymouth, Massachusetts. (Pictured: The Mayflower II) 

Dozens of events had been planned to commemorate the event but were canceled or pushed back to 2021 due to the pandemic

Dozens of events had been planned to commemorate the event but were canceled or pushed back to 2021 due to the pandemic 

The traditional narrative depicting Pilgrims as rugged pioneers and adventurers have been rejected by critics who believe they were colonizers who took part in a slow-motion genocide of Native Americans

The traditional narrative depicting Pilgrims as rugged pioneers and adventurers have been rejected by critics who believe they were colonizers who took part in a slow-motion genocide of Native Americans

America's reckoning on race has reignited a national conversation about social injustice as well as the country's problematic history of slavery and imperialism.  

The longstanding narrative of how the pilgrims came to establish the original 13 Colonies and their conquest of the land's native people has been reexamined and debunked in recent years. 

Most American children grew up with the feel-good story of the Pilgrims: How Native Americans extended the hand of friendship to the English settlers, helping them survive their first winter on these shores, and later joining them for the first Thanksgiving feast - but there is a darker side to that tale. 

Critics have dismissed the portrayal of pilgrims as rugged pioneers and adventurers and instead believe they were colonizers who took part in a slow-motion genocide of Native Americans. 

The counter-narrative is perhaps most prominently promoted in The New York Times' 1619 Project, launched by journalist Nikole Hannah-Jones in 2019, which 'aims to re-frame the country's history by placing the consequences of and the contributions of black Americans at the very center'. 

The title refers to the year

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