Columnist Suzanne Moore reveals she left the Guardian because she was 'betrayed ...

Columnist Suzanne Moore has revealed she left the Guardian because she was 'betrayed and bullied' at the newspaper for standing up for women.

The award-winning journalist, 62, said she felt hounded out by the 338 colleagues who rounded on her over an article that caused a huge 'transphobia' row. 

She said she was expecting the editor Katharine Viner to defend her, but was asked to go for lunch, which she declined.

Ms Moore also shed light on a culture of fear at the Guardian - presents itself as a bastion of liberalism and tolerance, and which openly stands in judgement of other media - saying 'a lot of people' wanted to stand up for her but were afraid of losing their jobs.

The award-winning journalist (pictured in 2016 with Paul Burston) said she felt hounded out by the 338 colleagues who rounded on her over an article that caused a huge 'transphobia' row

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The award-winning journalist (pictured in 2016 with Paul Burston) said she felt hounded out by the 338 colleagues who rounded on her over an article that caused a huge 'transphobia' row

Ms Moore was at the centre of a storm in March after publishing this column: 'Women must have the right to organise. We will not be silenced'

Ms Moore was at the centre of a storm in March after publishing this column: 'Women must have the right to organise. We will not be silenced'

Ms Moore was met with support online and from some colleagues after announcing her resignation

Ms Moore was met with support online and from some colleagues after announcing her resignation

Ms Moore was thrust into the centre of the 'transphobia' storm on March 20 over a column about feminists being abused by trans extremists.

The article, headlined 'Women must have the right to organise. We will not be silenced', saw her write about gender being a biological classification, 'not a feeling'.

But the comment piece prompted 338 Guardian employees to write to Viner, complaining about the paper's 'pattern of publishing transphobic content'.

'Women must have the right to organise. We will not be silenced': Guardian column which sparked a backlash 

Suzanne Moore's column titled, 'Women must have the right to organise. We will not be silenced', was published in the Guardian on March 2 this year. 

In it, she addressed how an Oxford historian had been barred from speaking at a feminist history event.

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Selina Todd, a professor in Modern History at St Hilda's College, was provided with security following 'transphobia' row. 

Trans-rights campaigners were believed to have taken issue with her ties to the women's rights group Woman's Place UK – which some claim to be 'transphobic'. 

The group, which denies being transphobic, has pushed for ministers to consult more widely about changing the Gender Recognition Act, which would allow people to self-identify as a man or woman without approval from a doctor. 

Professor Todd, who has always denied having transphobic views, was due to give a two-minute speech at an event at Exeter College.

But the day before Professor Todd was due to speak, she was 'no platformed'.

Ms Moore wrote: 'I feel a huge sadness when I look at the fragmentation of the landscape, where endless fighting, cancellations and no-platformings have obscured our understanding of who the real enemies are.'

Her column concluded: 'Women have the right to call out the violent men who rape.

'We have the right to speak and organise without being told that speech is itself dangerous.

'You can tell me to 'die in a ditch, terf' all you like, as many have for years, but I self-identify as a woman who won't go down quietly.'

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Ms Moore, who won the Orwell Foundation's Journalism Prize in 2019 and has written for the paper for a decade, and her children also faced death and rape threats.

She told the Telegraph: 'I feel betrayed. We are living in a world in which it is increasingly difficult to say certain things.'

She continued: 'I naively thought I would be defended, because that's what's always happened at other newspapers.'

She added: 'I realised how horrible it had been and I finally put a name to it all, which was bullying.

'I thought: ''338 people sign a letter that wants you fired and no one really stands up for you, this isn't a nice place to work...'''

Ms Moore's departure came amid a number of high-profile rows between feminism and transgender lobbies.

author JK Rowling was criticised earlier this year after she mocked an online article using the words 'people who menstruate' instead of 'women'.

Others to face criticism from transgender rights groups include Oxford University Professor Selina Todd and feminist blogger Kellie-Jay Keen-Minshull.

Announcing her resignation last week, Ms Moore tweeted: 'I have left The Guardian. I will very much miss SOME of the people there. For now that's all I can say.' 

She added: 'It was entirely my choice to go. I will tell you all about it one day. For now thank you for these lovely messages. I feel like I am at my own funeral or something.

'Anyway, I will keep writing of course! The efforts to shut me up seem not to have been very well thought through.'

Trainspotting writer Irvine Welsh, ex-footballer Gary Lineker, rock band Primal Scream and MP Jess Phillips were among those sharing their support for Ms Moore.

Journalists Polly Toynbee and Ian Dunt, and the author Giles Paley-Phillips have also expressed their sadness at Ms Moore's departure.

Ms Moore's Twitter bio now reads: 'She left because she understood the value of defiance.'

The staff letter denouncing 'transphobic content', which did not name Ms Moore, was leaked to Buzzfeed and Pink News in the wake of her column. 

Ms Moore later named the signatories online which included a number of people she considered friends.

The row began after Ms Moore addressed how Oxford historian Selina Todd had been barred from speaking at a feminist history event.

Professor Todd, a professor in Modern History at St Hilda's College, was provided with security over a 'transphobia' row.

Trans-rights campaigners were believed to have taken issue with her ties to the women's rights group Woman's Place UK – which some claim to be 'transphobic'.

The debate began after Ms Moore discussed Oxford historian Selina Todd, who was barred from speaking at a feminist history event

The debate began after Ms Moore discussed Oxford historian Selina Todd, who was barred from speaking at a feminist history event

The group, which denies being transphobic, has pushed for ministers to consult more widely about changing the Gender Recognition Act, which would allow people to self-identify as a man or woman without approval from a doctor.

Professor Todd, who has always denied having transphobic views, was due to give a two-minute speech at an event at Exeter College.

But the day before Professor Todd was due to speak, she was 'no platformed'.

Defending her in a column, Ms Moore said: 'We have gone through the looking-glass and are being told that sex is a construct.

'It is said that sex is merely assigned at birth, rather than being a material fact – actually, though, sex is recognisable in the womb (which is what enables foetal sex selection).

'Sex is not a feeling. Female is a biological classification that applies to all living species. If you produce large immobile gametes, you are female.

'Even if you are a frog. This is not complicated, nor is there a spectrum, although there are small numbers of intersex people who should absolutely be supported.'

She added: 'The materiality of having a female body may mean rape or it may mean childbirth – but we still seek liberation from gender.

'In some transgender ideology, we are told the opposite:

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