Rare condition means seven-month-old always seems happy

A seven-month-old girl has a rare genetic condition that means she only sleeps for four hours a day, never cries and is almost always smiling. 

Fiadh Baird was born three weeks early at Melbourne Women's Hospital on April 18 this year. 

Like most premature babies, she slept for the first week of her life, until she suddenly woke and screamed - non-stop, for 24 hours a day. 

Her mother Galatea Young told Daily Mail Australia the crying finally ended when Fiadh was put on medication for colic and reflux.

But when the wailing was replaced with smiles and laughter at two weeks old, the 28-year-old mother sensed something was wrong.

Insurance Loans Mortgage Attorney Credit Lawyer

Fiadh Baird (pictured with her mother Galatea Young) was born three weeks early on April 18 in Melbourne Women's Hospital

Fiadh Baird (pictured with her mother Galatea Young) was born three weeks early on April 18 in Melbourne Women's Hospital

Pictured: Fiadh in hospital in Melbourne when she was born early

Pictured: Ms Young in hospital preparing for Fiadh's birth

Pictured left: Fiadh in hospital in Melbourne when she was born early. Right: Ms Young in hospital preparing for Fiadh's birth

Like most premature babies, the infant slept for the first week of her life (pictured with her father Gareth Baird)

Like most premature babies, the infant slept for the first week of her life (pictured with her father Gareth Baird)

'I'm the oldest of four and there's a big age gap between my siblings and I, so I've been around babies all my life, and I knew mine was different,' Ms Young said. 

'She stopped sleeping between 10pm and 6am, but she never cried - she just lay there smiling ... I knew in my gut there was something different about her.'

After taking her baby to an infant sleep school and being told she was 'just a good mum' with a 'really happy baby', the new mother booked an appointment with a paediatrician. 

Insurance Loans Mortgage Attorney Credit Lawyer

She also did her own research online and watched a short video on a condition called Angelman syndrome - a neurological disorder that affects one in 15,000 people.

Pictured: Galatea Young and Gareth Baird holding their newborn daughter Fiadh in Melbourne

Pictured: Galatea Young and Gareth Baird holding their newborn daughter Fiadh in Melbourne

Pictured: Fiadh with her father

Pictured: Fiadh, laughing at two weeks old

When Fiadh started smiling and laughing at the early age of two weeks' old (right), the 28-year-old knew there was something wrong

Pictured: Ms Young with her daughter in hospital after she was born three weeks early in Melbourne

Pictured: Ms Young with her daughter in hospital after she was born three weeks early in Melbourne

In the video, the new mum learned that symptoms of the syndrome in very young children include frequent smiling and laughter, colic and reflux, difficulty swallowing and almost never crying.

Fiadh ticked all the boxes.

The paediatrician initially considered Angelman syndrome to be only a remote possibility, but ordered a genetic test to be sure.

On September 29 they mother was told she was right. 

It was a devastating diagnosis. While the symptoms may seem benign in a small child, the prognosis for Angelman sufferers is challenging as adults. 

Fiadh will grow physically like a typical person, but her neurological development will remain at the level of a toddler.

While people with the syndrome have a normal life expectancy, Fiadh will make a series of primitive sounds for the rest of her life in place of actual words, she may never walk, and she will be almost completely unable to communicate her needs.

'Angelman kids usually die of the most ordinary things, like sore stomachs and infections that turn into pneumonia because they can't give you any indication of what's wrong,' Ms Young said.

As a result, Fiadh will need constant supervision for the rest of her life. 

'It's one of the hardest things to hear - your child may never walk or talk or do the things other parents take for granted,' Ms Young said

'It's one of the hardest things to hear - your child may never walk or talk or do the things other parents take for granted,' Ms Young said

People with Angelman syndrome are obsessed with water, Ms Young said. Her daughter loves bath time

People with Angelman syndrome are obsessed with water, Ms Young said. Her daughter loves bath time

Because of her condition, Fiadh will grow physically like a typical person, but her neurological development will remain at that of a toddler's

Because of her condition, Fiadh will grow physically like a typical person, but her neurological development will remain at that of a toddler's

'It totally rocked our worlds,' she said, also referring to Fiadh's father Gareth Baird.

'It's one of the hardest things to hear - your child may never walk or talk or do the things other parents take for granted.'

Her mother explained that the youngster does get grumpy, but happiness is her natural reaction to most things - and she will smile even when she's scared or uncomfortable.

'Sometimes I hear other babies crying or babbling when I'm out, and I kind of wish my baby would cry sometimes because it would mean she's communicating with me,' she said.    

Fiadh will make a series of primitive sounds for the rest of her life in place of actual words, she may never walk, and she will be almost completely unable to communicate her needs

Fiadh will make a series of primitive sounds for the rest of her life in place of actual words, she may never walk, and she will be almost completely unable to communicate her needs

The infant (pictured with her father) has barely cried since she was ill with reflux and continues to only sleep for four hours

The infant (pictured with her father) has barely cried since she was ill with reflux and

read more from dailymail.....

NEXT UK officially exits the European Union mogaznewsen