Culture Secretary Oliver Dowden demands make it clear The Crown is ...

Oliver Dowden last night demanded that make clear The Crown is 'fiction'.

In a dramatic intervention, the Culture Secretary added his voice to mounting concern that fabricated scenes in the drama series were so damaging to the Royal Family that viewers should be warned at the start of each episode that it was not 'fact'.

'It's a beautifully produced work of fiction, so as with other TV productions, should be very clear at the beginning it is just that,' he told The Mail on Sunday.

'Without this, I fear a generation of viewers who did not live through these events may mistake fiction for fact.'

The Culture Secretary added his voice to mounting concern that fabricated scenes in the drama series were so damaging to the Royal Family (pictured, Princess Diana in the show)

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The Culture Secretary added his voice to mounting concern that fabricated scenes in the drama series were so damaging to the Royal Family (pictured, Princess Diana in the show) 

Mr Dowden is expected to write to the streaming giant to formally request that it adds what others have called a 'health warning' at the start of each episode.

It comes amid deepening concern that fabricated scenes written by screenwriter Peter Morgan are doing lasting damage to the monarchy and Prince Charles in particular. 

Last night, a friend of the Prince said: 'It is quite sinister the way that Morgan is clearly using light entertainment to drive a very overt republican agenda and people just don't see it. 

They have been lured in over the first few series until they can't see how they are being manipulated.

The Mail on Sunday has led calls for a disclaimer to be added to the series, amid claims it has already been watched by more people than tuned in for Charles's real-life wedding to Princess Diana (pictured)

The Mail on Sunday has led calls for a disclaimer to be added to the series, amid claims it has already been watched by more people than tuned in for Charles's real-life to Princess Diana (pictured)

'It is highly sophisticated propaganda.'

The Mail on Sunday has led calls for a disclaimer to be added to the series, amid claims it has already been watched by more people than tuned in for Charles's real-life to Princess Diana.

It was reported last week that 29 million logged on to the streaming service to watch the drama in the week after its release earlier this month – 600,000 more than the British TV audience for the actual in 1981.

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Controversy over invented scenes, including the false suggestion that the affair between Charles and Camilla Parker Bowles continued throughout his marriage to Diana, prompted the Princess's brother to add his voice to the calls for a disclaimer.

Earl Spencer told ITV: 'It would help The Crown an enormous amount if at the beginning of each episode it stated that, 'This isn't true but is based around some real events'. Because then everyone would understand it's drama for drama's sake.'

Mr Dowden, whose full title is Digital, Culture, Media and Sport Secretary, is also facing pressure to close a 'loophole' that requires British viewers who want to complain about The Crown to go to the Dutch TV regulator because is based in Holland. 

In a letter to Mr Dowden, Tory peer Lord Forsyth – who describes the latest series of The Crown as 'one step up from Spitting Image' – expressed surprise that ' pays no corporation tax as the £1 billion of UK subscriptions are paid to a Dutch company'.

There are deepening concerns that fabricated scenes written by screenwriter Peter Morgan are doing lasting damage to the monarchy and Prince Charles in particular (pictured, Princess Diana in The Crown)

There are deepening concerns that fabricated scenes written by screenwriter Peter Morgan are

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