Obama says he will take the coronavirus vaccine on live TV

Former president Barack Obama made a bold statement on Wednesday when he claimed he would be willing to take the coronavirus vaccination on live TV if it meant building trust in the drug as 42 per cent of Americans say they won't take the shot.

During an interview on SiriusXM's The Joe Madison Show, Obama said he wants people to know that he trusts the science behind the vaccine. 

'I will be taking it and I may take it on TV or have it filmed so people know that I trust this science,' he said. 

In the interview, which is scheduled to air in full on Thursday, Obama added: 'What I don't trust is getting Covid.' 

Former president Barack Obama made a bold statement on Wednesday when he claimed he would be willing to take the coronavirus vaccination on live TV if it meant building trust in the drug

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Former president Barack Obama made a bold statement on Wednesday when he claimed he would be willing to take the coronavirus vaccination on live TV if it meant building trust in the drug

During an interview on SiriusXM's The Joe Madison Show, Obama said he wants people to know that he trusts the science behind the vaccine (clinical trial pictured). 'I will be taking it and I may take it on TV or have it filmed so people know that I trust this science,' he said

During an interview on SiriusXM's The Joe Madison Show, Obama said he wants people to know that he trusts the science behind the vaccine (clinical trial pictured). 'I will be taking it and I may take it on TV or have it filmed so people know that I trust this science,' he said

Through surveys, many Americans have voiced their concerns with taking a vaccination that appears to them to have been rushed.

About 42 per cent of Americans said they would not take a vaccine approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), according to a November Gallup poll. 

Only 48 per cent of non-white adults said they would take the vaccine. 

Overall 37 per cent of the poll's respondents are concerned with a rushed timeline while 26 per cent want to wait to see if it's safe.  

And even though healthcare workers are expected to be the first group to receive the coronavirus vaccine, some are wary about doing so, according to a recent survey from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

The survey, which was conducted in September, found that nearly 40 per cent of people are 'not likely' to get the jab once it is approved.

Shared at the meeting of its vaccine advisory committee on November 23, the poll found only 21 per cent who said they were 'absolutely certain' to be immunized.

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The remaining 42 percent said they were 'very' or 'somewhat' likely.

On Tuesday, a CDC panel voted 13-1 to give healthcare workers and long-term care facility residents in the US the first coronavirus vaccine doses once it's cleared for public use, according to CNBC. 

A recent CDC survey found that 37% of healthcare workers say they were 'not likely' to get the coronavirus vaccine (above)

 A recent CDC survey found that 37% of healthcare workers say they were 'not likely' to get the coronavirus vaccine (above)

Obama also said that he would take the vaccine if Dr Anthony Fauci said it was safe. 

He even urged those who are most at risk to take the vaccine. 

'If you are in that category, if you are elderly, if you've got a preexisting condition, if you're a frontline worker, if you're a medical worker, if you are in a grocery store, if you're a first responder, you should take that vaccine,' he said.

Doctors and nurses say they are concerned about the speed at which COVID-19 vaccines were researched and developed as well as possible meddling from political figures to get the inoculations out quickly.

'I'm really hesitant about it,' Dr Kida Thompson, a family physician in El Paso, Texas, told NPR.

'For the ones of us who are asking questions, there's just a lot of questions.'

Thompson said she generally gets vaccines, including the yearly flu shot, because they have been proven safe and effective.

However, she said she is uncertain about getting a COVID-19 jab because the typically

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