Coronavirus UK: 1.5million self-employed tradesmen, cleaners and nannies are ...

Some 1.5million self-employed people are 'striving to find new forms of work to get by' during third England's third national lockdown amid a perceived lack of support.

Industry bodies have told of a 'resurgence of available work' for tradespeople since the first lockdown last March, but calls are growing for them to be only allowed to do essential work in homes to help reduce the spread of coronavirus.

Now, scientific advice group Independent Sage has urged the Government to only allow tradespeople to enter people's homes for work which cannot be delayed.

The workers are currently among the few sets of people you are still allowed to have inside your home - and there are no restrictions on the work they can do.

Tradespeople allowed to continue working includes – but is not limited to – people working in repair services, fitters, meter readers, plumbers and surveyors.

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But an industry group claimed today that 1.5million self-employed people have been excluded from Government financial support since the pandemic began.

This includes many tradespeople who may be newly self-employed, work through limited companies or work on short-term pay-as-you-earn contracts. 

Lorries, vans and cars on the M1 in Nottinghamshire today as the third lockdown continues

Lorries, vans and cars on the M1 in Nottinghamshire today as the third lockdown continues

Rush-hour commuters wait for a Jubilee line train at Canada Water in East London today

Rush-hour commuters wait for a Jubilee line train at Canada Water in East London today

Andy Chamberlain, policy director of the Association of Independent Professionals and the Self-Employed, told MailOnline today: 'Since the first lockdown, many in these groups have relied on a resurgence of available work to get by.

'The new lockdown measures are already squeezing self-employed incomes again – and if essential tradespeople are prevented from operating, it will hit their incomes further.'

What the rules say on tradesmen in homes

The UK Government is allowing tradespeople to continue working in other people's homes during the third national lockdown in England.

They come under an exemption list including the likes of nannies, cleaners and social care workers providing support to children and families.

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The list of tradespeople allowed to continue working includes – but is not limited to – people working in repair services, fitters, meter readers, plumbers and surveyors.

But the rules also say that any work by someone not living with a household should not take place in a private home or garden when it does not need to.

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He continued: '1.5million self-employed will now have been without support for almost a year. It's likely many in this group will be striving to find new forms of work to get by in this lockdown.'

Bringing in restrictions on what kind of work tradespeople could do might see the types of jobs limited - meaning redecorating might not be allowed.

Vital work such as replacing leaking pipes, repairing radiators and boiler repairs is likely to be allowed to continue even if new restrictions are brought in. 

Mr Chamberlain added: 'There are clear reasons for a renewed lockdown, but Government should have plugged the gaps in self-employed support first.

'We urge them to look again at limited company directors, PAYE freelancers, the newly self-employed and other excluded groups.

'In the case of the newly self-employed, many will this month be filing a full year's tax return: this was the problem government originally pointed to, so it has no reason to exclude them now.'

Workers allowed to continue being in other people's homes in England under law now also include nannies, cleaners and social care workers providing support to children and families.

Government guidance has stated that tradespeople can continue carrying out repairs and maintenance, provided that they are well and have no symptoms.

They are also advised not to carry out work in an isolating household unless it is to resolve a direct risk to their safety, such as emergency plumbing or repairs. 

But guidance also states that any work by someone not living with a household should not take place in a private home or garden when it does not need to.

People can continue to move home and look around other houses during the lockdown, while removal firms and estate agents are also allowed to operate. 

Susan Michie, a member of the Scientific Advisory Group for Emergencies and director of the Centre for Behaviour Change at University College London, cited tradespeople when insisting that current measures need to be tougher.

She told BBC Newsnight last Friday: 'We have mass gatherings, in

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